Day of Action ends in violence, two arrests

Calm protest punctuated by violent episodes

A police officer apprehends a demonstrator in Tolman Hall, where the Day of Action protesters occupied a room. The protest was propelled by persisting state budget cuts to the UC and accompanying tuition increases.
Eugene W. Lau/Staff
A police officer apprehends a demonstrator in Tolman Hall, where the Day of Action protesters occupied a room. The protest was propelled by persisting state budget cuts to the UC and accompanying tuition increases.

Tensions between police officers and demonstrators fluctuated throughout the course of a campus protest Thursday, culminating in a violent scuffle when one man was carried from Tolman Hall by his arms and legs.

At about 9 p.m., after over seven hours of protest inside the building, protesters were chanting in the lobby of Tolman and police officers began to move towards the doors to prevent a small crowd of demonstrators outside from entering the building.

(Watch a five-video series of UC Berkeley’s day of action)

Protesters then began running toward the west doors and an altercation with officers ensued. One man was carried away and arrested after being forced to the ground by police officers.

During the altercation, protesters became riled and threw objects at police, resulting in a cracked window.

The demonstrators left the building around 9:10 p.m.

Propelled by persisting state budget cuts to the University of California and accompanying tuition increases, a group of around 150 left a noontime rally in Sproul Plaza and marched through campus. Led by a small contingent of about 20 bandana-clad protesters carrying makeshift shields adorned with artwork from famous works of literature, the group eventually reached Tolman Hall around 1:20 p.m and stayed for over seven hours.

A crush of around 70 protesters rushed the western doorway of the building, urging the crowd to follow them.

Police and protesters scuffled as officers tried to pull several protesters away from the doors.

In the melee, at least one protester was pepper-sprayed by two police officers, said UCPD spokesperson Lt. Marc DeCoulode.

Protesters and police clash in front of Tolman Hall. - Anna Vinget/Senior Staff

Once inside, protesters continued to rally, their clamoring cries of “They say cut back, we say fight back” and other chants reverberating down the halls. After marching the length of the second floor hallway, demonstrators eventually gathered in room 2308.

In the classroom, the tenor of the demonstration cooled to a largely calm discussion — save a few tense reactions to the presence of police officers and local television media — in which the demonstrators introduced themselves to one another and shared thoughts about the condition of the university and the state.

“My dad is a gardener, my mom is a maid — I come from immigrant families, and how the hell am I supposed to afford this education?” asked freshman Stephanie Benitez.

Should the UC Board of Regents approve a multi-year plan that could send tuition and fees skyrocketing to over $22,000 by 2015, Benitez said she would no longer be able to afford her enrollment.

After discussing mounting student debt, the conversation shifted to building momentum for a planned walkout in early November.

Several protesters stressed the need for a thorough organizing effort in order to get large numbers of students to turn out. The walkout is being organized for Nov. 9 and 10 by United Auto Workers Local 2865, a union representing UC graduate students, readers and tutors.

Campus spokesperson Janet Gilmore said the campus agreed with the motivations behind the demonstration.

“We share the students’ frustrations over the state’s disinvestment in higher education, and we support their right to protest,” she said.

One protester, Shane Boyle, said the group chose to “reclaim the space” at Tolman Hall because the campus closed the building’s 13 regular classrooms starting this semester.

Tolman — which houses the campus’s Graduate School of Education — was deemed seismically “poor” in a 1997 study of campus buildings. A lack of state funding to replace the building prompted the closure, though staff and faculty remain in the building.

A protester is carried away by police after being arrested inside Tolman Hall - Kevin Foote/ staff

After the demonstrators’ discussion ended around 4:15 p.m., they remained in room 2308 until making their way down the hall to room 2320 at about 5 p.m. in order to view a film about the Black Panthers.

The demonstrators regrouped in 2308 and began another meeting at about 7 p.m. One man was arrested around 8 p.m. because he grabbed a magazine clip from an officer’s belt earlier that day, DeColoude said.

Alisha Azevedo, Jaehak Yu and Aadia Samad of The Daily Californian contributed to this report.

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  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_WRACM77JT2RXUR3LMGDPPUGUYY Tony M

    Notice in these news pics how the males who are arrested are always grimacing filthy dirtbags. No wonder they suffer from “income inequality” – who in their right mind would employ them in any position of substance to represent their organization?

  • ano

    September 22nd Day of Action + Crazy Police Brutality @ UC Berkeley (HD):
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uzlq7S-MEOE

    • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_WRACM77JT2RXUR3LMGDPPUGUYY Tony M

      You have no idea what police brutality is, you ignorant child.

      • ano

        What is police brutality then?

        • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_WRACM77JT2RXUR3LMGDPPUGUYY Tony M

          An example of REAL “police brutality” would be a physical response to a PEACEFUL, lawful protests, for example, if these were just people walking up and down the sidewalk with picket signs. Sorry, but trespassing, disobeying lawful police orders, and throwing stuff at cops is NOT a peaceful protest. If you go looking for a fight, you have no right to whine and cry if you get one…

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_WRACM77JT2RXUR3LMGDPPUGUYY Tony M

    [I have a college education from a top school, graduated cum laude, and I
    am working 50 hours a week making $16,000/year after taxes and am
    $25,000 in debt from school.]

    You sure didn’t do your research before you chose your particular course
    of study, did you? Instead of taking some fluff major so I could get
    easy grades, I looked at what I was good at, what interested me, and
    what type of demand there would be in the marketplace. That’s what
    sensible people should do before they invest their effort in college.

    [My expectation is that when there are enough resources to go around to
    ensure that everyone is doing ok (think about the billions of dollars
    corporations are just sitting on, the billions of dollars of income
    earned by just a few hundred people), we should fight for a reallocation
    to make that vision a reality.]

    More like your expectations are that wealth should be distributed to
    compensate for your piss-poor life planning and lack of common sense. You really think that some degree program in Protest Studies had the same value as one in the hard sciences or engineering?  Sorry to burst your bubble, but all majors are NOT created equal.

    • bud dry

      Actually, unless the job you’re applying for is a research position or involves knowledge of math/statistics, employers don’t really give a shit about your major.  They give a shit about your verbal and written communication skills, your ability to think creatively, and your ability to manage your time well.  While there are more employed engineers and hard scientists, they have not escaped unemployment as firms reduce the amount they spend on R+D, since the future of the economy is looking so unstable. 

      I have a social science degree with a minor in statistics.  I received A’s in all of the courses in my major, as well as a few outside my major, including calculus, linear algebra, and pre-med level biology (my GPA was lowered considerably by my freshman year, which I found to be a tough transition).  I was hired out of college for a position that paid $40,000/year, worked there 2 years, and was laid off 6 months ago and have since been unable to find full-time work. 

      For those whose parents have little money, who went to gang-infested schools, who had to take care of their siblings while their parents worked 70 hours/week at minimum wage, who are sick, who have poor mental health, whose crimes from youth kill their life chances, who were never encouraged by teachers, who have few visions of what college is like, who came to college with the intellect to succeed but not the skills from high school, who had to use some of their student loans to support their families, who couldn’t major in the hard sciences because their school didn’t offer advanced math classes and they couldn’t afford an extra semester or two to make up the coursework, who suffer from stereotype threat that hampers their grades, who do not receive the attention of faculty because they do not fit the middle class white stereotype of a “serious” student — for those who, for all these reasons, are struggling to make ends meet financially for reasons not of their own choosing (you may find this hard to believe, but the “choices” that people make are limited to what people think is possible, and not every environment provides people with knowledge about how to get into college, the relationship between major and the labor market, and that these are things you should be thinking about; let’s see you try to concentrate in school and pay attention when most of your day is spent trying to avoid getting the shit kicked out of you for not joining a gang), I believe there should be some basic level of tax-based financial support for people who find themselves in these situations.

      • bud dry

        (and A’s in all the courses in statistics as well)

      • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_WRACM77JT2RXUR3LMGDPPUGUYY Tony M

        [Actually, unless the job you’re applying for is a research position or involves knowledge of math/statistics, employers don’t really give a
        shit about your major. ]

        Oh, really? Maybe in the low-end job that you’re working at, but try to get an engineering job at Intel or IBM with a PhD in “protest studies” and watch them laugh your sorry ass out the door. You really don’t have a clue, which is why by your own admission you’re holding down a job that pays about $10/hour. Oh well, I guess your communication skills come in handy when you need to ask your customer important questions, such as “would you like fries with that?”

        • bud dry

          Right, that’s what I just said.  Unless you are doing a job which requires knowledge of math/statistics/programming, employers don’t give a shit about your major.  There are plenty of jobs that pay well — not spectacularly well — but well enough, in the $30-50,000 range right out of undergrad.  Many are at non-profits, research firms, public policy institutions, marketing firms, etc.  Many of those who are making big bucks at investment banks out of college have degrees in social science and the humanities. 

          My boss at my last job had a bachelor’s in international relations and was making $280,000/year (obviously not right out of college).  Another colleague with a masters in public policy, who directed the research branch of the organization, made a little over $100,000. 

          Also, I got laid off from my job because my position was funded by a grant from a private foundation, and the foundation could not afford to renew the grant.  Your response is to mock me. 

          You seem to have no sympathy for people who lose their jobs, as though I lost it because I wasn’t working hard enough. 

          Despite that, I have sympathy for you.  Seeing how often you resort to personal insults, seeing that it is never enough for you to make and point and just engage in the conversation, you’re obviously not a very happy human.  I’ve done some of the same (“your 40 year old ass” — that was totally unnecessary), and I apologize for that.

          I hope you can find a bit more self-love at some point so you spend less time treating people like shit on internet forums, and more time taking an interest in your own life.  Peace out.

          • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_WRACM77JT2RXUR3LMGDPPUGUYY Tony M

            [Right, that’s what I just said.  Unless you are doing a job which requires knowledge of math/statistics/programming, employers don’t give a shit about your major.]

            Well true, it doesn’t take an understanding of diff eq to quantum mechanics to stuff fries in a bag, does it?

            [Also, I got laid off from my job because my position was funded by a grant from a private foundation, and the foundation could not afford to renew the grant. ]

            I work in the private sector. I make sure I’m gainfully employed by making sure our company develops and delivers products that people will voluntarily pay for.  That’s how it rolls for most people in this country. You should try it some time.

            [Your response is to mock me. ]

            I don’t mock you for being unemployed. I mock you for thinking anyone’s impressed because you’re a PhD in freaking “Protest Studies”, and being so clueless as to wonder why there aren’t any employers who are in awe of yourself as you apparently are.  Personally, I would be EMBARRASSED to admit to anyone that I actually pissed away an opportunity to attend a UC school my majoring in nonsensical crap like that, but then again, that’s just me… :O)

  • Anonymous

    Go Bears!

  • Somebody

    Here’s a thought.  March down Telegraph to the UC President’s office in downtown Oakland and protest there.  How can you expect the oligarchs in their ivory tower to notice anything?  Once they go to work everyday seeing broken windows and trashed offices, they might realize you guys mean business.  Protesting at Cal has become a cliche, no one cares anymore.  Let people who paid a lot for their classes learn something, and the banging of pots and pans go to the ears of administration.  
    Everybody knows the reason why there are more female college students today is because sex work pays so well.  ($1000/week on average.  Stripping is about the same. webcam shows, etc.)  So well, Craigslist had to shut down the escort links at the request of Attorney Generals.  Backpage is next.   The UC Regents are pimps willing to whore out someone’s daughters at a drop of the hat.  They force upon women to make choices at a young age that they should not have to make: drop out of college or open wide.  
    Male students working in retail or other minimum wage jobs to save for college is a joke.  Look, if you’re smart enough to be at Cal, you know the education costs are outpacing your paycheck so why bother to work?  Not working?, why bother to even look?  Let the self-centered, self-serving hippie baby boomers scramble for their retirement.  Why pay taxes that’s going to Social Security and Medicare and no financial aid to you! -the taxpayer?   You’re paying into a government sanctioned Ponzi fund that you’ll never be a recipient of.  You can’t possibly believe that working for nickels and dimes is going to pay for college.  This is America’s quiet scandal.  
    This country is long overdue for education reform.  College must be free!  It is a human right.  You take away our lands and give them to the banks so we can no longer hunt and gather freely, we have to play by your game of jumping through hoops at college and at work to survive.  You can get a rate contract with gyms, cars, mobile phones, insurance, rent, anything except college.  One day it’s this cost, then overnight it’s this cost.  American students and parents heartache and heart attack each year as voted by UC Regents to raise the tuition.  How is a student supposed to concentrate with studies and come up with money for the new costs?  The UC is becoming a country club, as higher education reaches full circle, and once again becomes a hobby of the rich.  Democracy is killed off by capitalism and nepotism.  How else do you explain the rich get mega rich?  What middle-class?  
    A college senior can graduate with a tuition higher than when it was at freshman level, only four years!  How is anyone suppose to budget around this?  This is telling prospective students to bend over and take it.  Why isn’t government protecting students so a freshman can expect to pay the same tuition rate through graduation.  It’s obvious that the skyrocketing costs of higher education has more to do with padding the funds of pensioners and little to do with operating costs since many were cut anyway.  It’s ridiculous that the people who should have saved for retirement wisely are now depending on the student population with no degree, no jobs, no money.   If people had money to pay for college tuition now, they wouldn’t bother with college in the first place.  Students spend more annually in college that what they will make in their first years of income, that is if someone is still hiring!  Meanwhile, the loans pile up.  
    The University of China, excuse me- I meant to say the University of California is depending on out of state students to fix their financial woes leaving community college students by the wayside.  Seats that are taken from Americans and given to the highest bidder.  Bad enough they already have our jobs.  What should be pointed out to the administration, is that students that are neglected here are more likely to throw very large stones, something that cannot be done across the world…hint hint wink wink.  The UC Regents are sending a negative message to today’s youth, even if you work hard in a community college for years it doesn’t mean anything to them.  But they insist on taking your taxes.  That is taxation without representation.  It’s time to make higher education the utmost priority in California again.  We were great, and we can be great once again.  We just need to rattle the cage harder.  Don’t let the gates of college close on future and current students because some rent a cop is holding a pepper spray.  This is Bear territory Bitches!

  • Guest

    “Reclaim the space” at Tolman? As if the decision to cancel classes there was to punish the students somehow, rather than keep them safe? The university wasn’t trying to diminish students’ education by closing those classrooms. They were trying the best that they could to ensure that those students are alive to get an education (though, granted, the professors will be dead) in the face of no money to replace the building.

  • Anonymous

    One protester, Shane Boyle, said the group chose to “reclaim the space”
    at Tolman Hall because the campus closed the building’s 13 regular
    classrooms starting this semester.

    Smart people.  They chose to occupy an unsafe building.

    • bud dry

      Yes, the horror!  The protest organizers and participants were actually willing to risk a measure of safety so as not to disrupt classes with the protest.  Can you imagine people actually putting themselves in danger to support a cause they believe in?   Craziness!

  • Anonymous

    FACULTY and CHANCELLOR wage concessions are answer to annual tuition increases. Focus on Cal  Chancellor Birgeneau and Cal Academic Senate and Academic Council.

    Like so many Alumni,
    Corporate Donors, Legislators, and Californians I am deeply disappointed by the
    pervasive failures of UC senior management and Regents.

    Californians are
    reeling from 19% unemployment (includes those working part time, and those no
    longer searching), mortgage defaults, loss of unemployment benefits. And those
    who still have jobs are working longer for less. Chancellor/Faculty
    wages must reflect California’s
    ability to pay, not what others are paid.

    However we also
    understand that there needs to be reasonable limits that reflect economic
    realities. UC Berkeley (Cal)
    planned pay raises for generously paid Faculty is arrogance.

    UC Berkeley (ranked #
    70 Forbes) tuition increases exceed national average rate of increase.
    Chancellor Birgeneau’s leadership molds Cal
    into the most expensive public university in the USA.

    Can we do better with a spirit of shared sacrifices by UC Faculty, Provosts, and Chancellors?

    (17,000 earn more than $100,000)

    No furloughs.

    18 percent decrease
    UCOP salaries, $50 million budget cut.

    18 percent prune chancellors’ salaries.

    15 percent trim tenured faculty salaries,
    increase teaching.

    10 percent non-tenured faculty pay decrease,
    increase research, teaching.

    100% elimination
    of Academic Senate, Academic Council budgets.

     

    There is no
    question the necessary realignments with economic reality are painful.

     

    UC Board of Regents Chair Sherry
    Lansing can bridge the public trust gap with reassurances salaries reflect
    depressed California
    wages. With UC’s shared financial sacrifices, the sky above UC will not fall.

    Yours is the
    opinion that can make the difference, email UC Board of Regents   [email protected]

  • Student

    Have I missed something, like financial aid being completely eliminated?

    • bud dry

      Have you missed something like the recession making it increasingly difficult to pay off debt?

  • Guest

    These people aren’t “student protestors”.  They are violent anarchists, with no connection to UC, who showed up here intending to start a violent confrontation (which they did).

    If you throw chunks of concrete at police, they should be authorized to use live ammunition to eliminate the threat to their life.
     

    • 4564

      Do you know all of them? Did you go up to them and ask them if they were all anarchists? If they attended UCB? Obviously not.

      • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_WRACM77JT2RXUR3LMGDPPUGUYY Tony M

        [Do you know all of them? Did you go up to them and ask them if they were all anarchists? If they attended UCB? Obviously not.]

        Those of us who went to call know damn well that there is a cadre of non-student, semi-professional activist/agitator types who are usually involved in these types of violent confrontations. Real Cal students, at least those majoring in academically and intellectually demanding courses of studies (which of course does not include stuff such as Peace and Conflict Studies, various racial/ethnic grievance/victim studies programs and the like) don’t have the time to invest in this crap, nor are they willing to risk expulsion or a criminal record that would seriously hinder their future career opportunities. In other words, the instigators aren’t real students, just various and sundry low-lifes looking to stir up shit…

        • bud dry

          A couple here and there use the protests as ways to cause trouble rather than wage real political fights. But this is about 1% of them.  You haven’t gone to Cal in almost 20 years.  While the  concepts of sacrifice and integrity may not be familiar to you, there actually are a considerable number of students willing to miss class and get arrested to support their belief that affordable, quality education should be a priority of the state.

          • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_WRACM77JT2RXUR3LMGDPPUGUYY Tony M

            And getting arrested accomplishes what, other than satisfying some emotional urge to “do something”? 

            What you can’t seem to get through that thick skull of yours is that the very people who have the power to solve the problem – i.e. the taxpayers who actually pay the bills and subsidize your education – aren’t going to suddenly feel pangs of guilt when they hear that some unwashed child shouting obscenities and breaking the law in the name of “protest”  isn’t getting a 100% free ride through college.

            You probably haven’t given this much thought, most likely because you have never had any real responsibilities to others (holding down a full-time job, supporting a family), but in case you haven’t heard, there are a lot of people out there – many who have NOT had the same PRIVILEGE (yes, it’s a privilege, not a right) of going to ANY college, much less Cal – who are dealing with tough times right now. 12% of adults are unemployed in this state, a whole lot more are underemployed, people are losing their homes, and not sure how they are going to support their families. They pay some of the highest state tax rates in the country, see politicians and bureaucrats piss away money on failed government projects while they are maxing out credit cards to feed and clothe their families, and what comes along on TV but a bunch of college students throwing tantrums and fighting with the cops? And for what reason? To demand that the already strapped taxpayers shell even MORE money into a bloated educational bureaucracy that can’t manage its own finances?

            Sorry, but you and your ilk are quickly losing sympathy among the vast majority of working people in this country, whether they are Republicans, Democrats, black, white, hispanic, or otherwise. Get a clue.

          • bud dry

            The goal is not to get arrested.  But it is often a product of protest. 

            Some are demanding that education should be free.  But most are demanding just a stop to the fee increases.  It would cost the median taxpayer $32/year more in taxes to make UC solvent for the indefinite future.  I think most taxpayers would be willing to pay that to ensure that their children are able to receive an education that does not put them in debt for the rest of their lives.

            Much of the reason why our state is in the shitter is because of massive disinvestment in public education.  We just aren’t producing as many skilled workers as we used to.

            College only seems like a privilege because it is now so goddam expensive.  It has *become* a privilege, rather than a right.  Would you consider elementary education a privilege?  Should people pay their way through elementary school?  If, 50 years from now, people were paying $5,000/year for elementary school, and people were demanding that learning to read and acquire basic math skills was a right, not a privilege, would you side with them?  Because in California, public education used to be a right.  The Master Plan said that we believe that a college education, where one learns to be an engaged citizen, acquire the skills demanded of the labor market, and acquire an understanding of the life circumstances of a wide cross-section of the population, should be a right — because it is for the benefit of the general welfare.

            There is no such thing is a de facto distinction between a right and a privilege.  What was once a privilege can be dismantled and institutionalized as a right.  What was once a right can be dismantled and access restricted.

          • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_WRACM77JT2RXUR3LMGDPPUGUYY Tony M

            [There is no such thing is a de facto distinction between a right and a
            privilege.  What was once a privilege can be dismantled and
            institutionalized as a right.  What was once a right can be dismantled
            and access restricted. ]

            You have a very poor understanding of a lot of things. What did you say you were majoring in again?

          • bud dry

            Thank you for this most recent contribution to this conversation.  I now have a much better understanding of how very wrong I am.

  • Cooper

    Perhaps all students ought to know that the stadium “retrofit” is costing Regents $1.185 Billion – google Barsky’s daily cal article “Financial Plan on Shaky Ground” – then ask why Intercollegiate Athletics, that bleeds money from the Berkeley campus, is such a high priority.  (note: using daily cal search will not locate this article, but google search will)

    • RicardoLies

      We like athletes and games.  We hate rock throwing and torch tossing protesters who have a huge sense of entitlement.  Athletes work hard for what they get — protesters just say gimme gimme gimme

      • Guest

        Perhaps you need a study in history of social movement. Everything goes back to protesting, including the freedom you are getting right now as the result of American independence as well as labor rights. Do not attempt to make generalization that wipe out everything that people in the American history fought for.

        • Anonymous

          University
          of California Berkeley Chancellor Robert J Birgeneau
          ($500,000 salary), displaces qualified for public university education at Cal.
          Californians with $50,600 FOREIGN students.

           

          Ranked # 70 by Forbes, the University of California
          Berkeley is not increasing enrollment.  $50,600 FOREIGN students are accepted by
          Birgeneau at the expense of qualified instate students.

           

          Your opinions make a difference; email UC Board of
          Regents   [email protected]

        • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_WRACM77JT2RXUR3LMGDPPUGUYY Tony M

          [Perhaps you need a study in history of social movement.]

          There’s a big difference between peaceful protests a la Gandhi or MLK, and “direct action” which bears more resemblance to the thuggery of various Nazi and Bolshevik splinter groups a la Weimar-era Germany. Get a clue…

          • You’reignorant

            This country exists because of direct action. History goes back further than the 1930s.

            And MLK was killed because he was getting deeper and deeper into direct action, into radicalism. Look at how his attitude changed after getting attacked by a white mob during Operation Breadbasket in Chicago trying to de-segregate whites-only neighborhoods.

          • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_WRACM77JT2RXUR3LMGDPPUGUYY Tony M

            [And MLK was killed because he was getting deeper and deeper into direct action, into radicalism.]

            No, he was killed by a lone loser looking for fame and attention, the usual motivation for assassinations. Really dude, you need to develop additional reference sources other than the plot lines for Oliver Stone movies…

          • bud dry

            Ah, yes, Tony, my doctoral level class on the history of social movements just completed its week on “losers and assassins.”  Very interesting stuff, thanks for your contribution to this discussion.

          • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_WRACM77JT2RXUR3LMGDPPUGUYY Tony M

            [Ah, yes, Tony, my doctoral level class on the history of social movements]

            Thanks for confirming what I thought. You’re not pursuing any course of study requiring academic or intellectual rigor. You’re engaged in some crap PC multi-culti crap that will most likely leave you unemployable in the private sector when all is said and done…

          • bud dry

            Putting aside for a moment the question of whether social science involves rigor, my point is just that if you are actually well-read in the history of social movements, your theory of lunatics killing important people has absolutely no basis in fact.  Yes, there have been lunatics.  But they are in the minority.

          • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_WRACM77JT2RXUR3LMGDPPUGUYY Tony M

            [Putting aside for a moment the question of whether social science involves rigor]

            LOL. You’re funny. Not particularly bright, but funny.

          • bud dry

            Yes, students marching from a campus plaza to an empty, off-limits, building is much more like slaughtering innocent people than it is black people sitting down at a restaurant that doesn’t welcome them. 

          • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_WRACM77JT2RXUR3LMGDPPUGUYY Tony M

            You left out the part about fighting with the cops. How convenient…

          • bud dry

            First of all, the police often instigate the violence.  Not always.  Sometimes protesters, having just seen their friends and lovers have the shit beaten out of them, will respond in kind.  But your analogy with Nazis is just ludicrous and amazingly offensive. 

          • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_WRACM77JT2RXUR3LMGDPPUGUYY Tony M

            [First of all, the police often instigate the violence.  Not always. 
            Sometimes protesters, having just seen their friends and lovers have the
            shit beaten out of them, will respond in kind. ]

            Cry me a river, junior. You join some activity knowing damn well that certain people in that group are looking for a fight, then you whine like a baby when the shit hits the fan. You’re not an especially bright one, are you?

    • Protesterssuck

      Umm… no. Most of the funding that went to the renovation of Memorial Stadium was raised by private donations and boosters.  Get your facts straight. Barsky’s facts are totally off.

  • Jamie

    I wonder why this article doesn’t address the rally, the speakers, or the march that followed. There are people behind this movement fighting in different ways than occupying buildings and confronting the police. It’s important to highlight the nonviolent methods being used to reach out to a broader community and not isolate them. It puzzles me why the Daily Cal nor the ASUC wants to fight for a Public Education with us, and instead casts us unrealistic activist outcasts. I encourage everybody to evaluate how they would like to organize, and take action in the way they feel may make a difference, because without unity, we are completely lost.

    • Guest

       I think it says something that there were less than 200 protesters at a school of over 30,000 students. These protests are obviously NOT reaching a broader community, and they haven’t been in a while, and I think that is a huge problem that needs to be addressed in the coming months 

  • Joe N

    I’ll be going soo off topic..

    “My dad is a gardener, my mom is a maid — I come from immigrant families, and how the hell am I supposed to afford this education?” asked freshman Stephanie Benitez. 
    Hooters?

    Seriously, all high school seniors should learn from this and know what they are getting into.  If you come from a low-income family, You should be realistic, not idealistic.  Know your limits, know where you want to be, and know how to get there.

    This is very generalized but applies to most cases:

    Ideally, you’d know at least 3 majors you’d like to study. Know what the expecting salary for a person with that major should expect upon graduation.  Know what additional certifications/studies are needed upon graduation for employment. Find colleges/universities that match your interests within a comfortable tuition/fee range.  Look up their curriculum and minimum qualifications, specifically transferable credits. Find a local community college (AND LIVE AT HOME) to take the pre-requisite courses, make sure your ideal university/college accepts those courses. Find part time jobs/summer jobs to increase savings.  Find volunteer positions within your field to pad your resume. Eventually, transfer when you have a bit saved and can afford living on your own.

    Extra tips: 1) Maximize grant/scholarship options. Merit-based, local, state, and federal grants /scholarships, charity-sponsored grants, church sponsored scholarships, etc.  Do your own research, don’t expect guidance counselors to hand you everything. 2)You do not have to go to college immediately upon graduating high school.  Take some time to work, take a trip, learn more about yourself.  Read, explore, work.  It’ll help you focus on what you really want from life.  3) Seriously consider a local community college and commuting from home.   The first 2 years at a university, you could spend 40k for an education you would have spent 10k on and lived at home, saving more money.
    4) Be ready for challenges and issues.  Anticipate them and be flexible.  With Stephanie and her tuition hike,  If that severely impacts how she expects to pay for her education, the smart thing would be to tap into additional resources (grants/scholarships) or worst case, withdraw from that school and find one more affordable.  

    • Guest

      Correctomundo!   Stephanie – If you can’t afford the Cadillac you just have to drive the Ford.

      • Guest

        Learning about yourself and the world around you should be a lifetime pursuit. Are young people today just pursuing education for the sake of becoming a machine chasing after money?

        • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_WRACM77JT2RXUR3LMGDPPUGUYY Tony M

          [Learning about yourself and the world around you should be a lifetime pursuit. Are young people today just pursuing education for the sake of becoming a machine chasing after money?

          Why do you equate the desire to acquire an education that provides marketable skills and knowledge as somehow being a “machine chasing after money”? It’s quite clear that a certain group of individuals views education more as a means to indoctrinate others or push a social/political agenda. Sorry, but all the activism, slogans, and quaint political theories don’t put food on the table or pay the rent. If a young person is going to invest in a college education so they can stand on their own two feet someday, it makes sense to have an idea of the cost/benefit tradeoff when deciding what major to pursue, and what college to attend. That certainly was part of my decision process when I decided to study chemistry and chemical engineering at Cal. Just out of curiosity, how did YOU decide to invest your academic efforts? Unless you plan on spending the rest of your life living with Mommy and Daddy, I would certainly hope you gave that some thought as well…

          • bud dry

            “Sorry, but all the activism, slogans, and quaint political theories don’t put food on the table or pay the rent.”

            They do if they help the movement to keep public education affordable. 

          • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_WRACM77JT2RXUR3LMGDPPUGUYY Tony M

            [They do if they help the movement to keep public education affordable.]

            They do nothing of the kind, just a bunch of screaming and tantrum throwing by a bunch of attention-starved narcissists… The people who work in the private sector, pay taxes, and carry the vast share of the economic burden in this country are the people who make education “affordable” through their tax payments, not the hippie holders and unwashed professional agitators looking for media attention however they can get it.

          • bud dry

            If this movement results in more tax revenue being allocated to public education, hence making the university less dependent on student fees, then public education will become more affordable with no additional cost to taxpayers. 

          • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_WRACM77JT2RXUR3LMGDPPUGUYY Tony M

            ???

          • bud dry

            You say that protesters will not make public education more affordable because it is taxpayers who make it more affordable. 

            First, these students are taxpayers.  Many of them work full time to pay for college.

            Secondly, they will be taxpayers once and if they graduate (if increasing fees don’t force them out). 

            But my original point was that if protest results in tax revenue being redirected from things like corporate welfare and the prison system, then the State will be able to provide a larger subsidy for higher education, hence a reduction in fees.  That’s the whole reason why fees are going up. 

    • Inezedmart

      I like this.  Keep the poor people in the ghetto.  Make sure they know their place.  Great advice.

      • Guest

        I think  what she is trying to do is to share tips for people to reach their dreams. I do not know why you turned that into this inappropriate and insulting statement. Clearly you lack the neccessary knowledge and compassion to understand how difficult someone’s life can be.

        • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_WRACM77JT2RXUR3LMGDPPUGUYY Tony M

          [I think  what she is trying to do is to share tips for people to reach their dreams. I do not know why you turned that into this inappropriate and insulting statement. Clearly you lack the neccessary knowledge and compassion to understand how difficult someone’s life can be.]

          Your points are well taken, but keep in mind that you’re dealing with someone who is more interested in peddling an agenda than offering practical advice, which involved dealing with and accepting reality.

      • UC Grad

         There are a many and varied scholarship opportunities for students based on their interests, and importantly based upon making a case to a granting group that you are interested and would give back to the community should you receive a scholarship or stipend.

        I went to community college for two years and lived at home. Did I like it?  Not really but I did it because it was the least expensive way to do undergrad course work. Then I transferred to UCD fro the remaining two year.   After that I went to a State University for my Masters. All of it was much less expensive that attending UC for six straight years. 

      • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_WRACM77JT2RXUR3LMGDPPUGUYY Tony M

        [Keep the poor people in the ghetto.  Make sure they know their place.]

        Joe N said nothing of the kind. You obviously have your own axe to grind and aren’t open to listening to the viewpoints of others.

    • bud dry

      Of course you want to be responsible about financing your education.  But what Stephanie is saying isn’t that she decided to pursue an education she can’t afford — but rather that if fees continue to rise year after year, it will become unaffordable to her.  That’s the whole point of the protest.

  • Thedailycalishorrible

    Once again, the Daily Cal writers prove that they will repeat whatever lies the police tell them. (Just a bit of journalistic advice, when you’re relaying information told to you by a source, it’s convention to attribute it to that source, rather than write it as established fact). The police weren’t trying to keep people from getting *in* to the building. They were trying to keep people from getting out — that is, they were attempting to close the doors without issuing a dispersal order and giving people a chance to get out. Typical, but nonetheless despicable. The altercation started when people rushed to the doors to get out. . .

    • oskirules

      At this point, I believe the Daily Cal’s version of events rather than thedailycalishorrible’s version.

      • Thedailycalishorrible

        well, here’s an account by the participants themselves. you’re free to believe what you want. we’re also free to think you an idiot and a dupe: http://www.facebook.com/photo.php?v=10150281761446706

        • RicardoLies

          Ricardo CONVENIENTLY doesn’t show the violence of the protesters throwing rocks.

        • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_WRACM77JT2RXUR3LMGDPPUGUYY Tony M

          Ooh, Facebook. Now THAT’s a credible source…

          • bud dry

            So if the same people said exactly the same thing in your living room, then you’d believe them?  Is your 40 year old ass a bit behind the times?

          • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_WRACM77JT2RXUR3LMGDPPUGUYY Tony M

            My “40 year old ass” is out working and trying to make a living in tough times. By no means am I wealthy, but I pay more in taxes in any given year than you have probably ever earned. I AM with the times – the time of the Great Obama Recession, working 50-60 hours a week, taking care of businesses, and like most working people in this country, losing patience with the professional whiners and malcontents.

            Listen, I know going to school can be a financial burden – I lived off of $0.99 cheeseburgers, ramen and rice while cribbing in a ratty apartment in Oaktown – and it took about 10 years after graduation for me to pay off my college debts. OTOH, you’re (hopefully) getting a benefit that will pay off later in life. You’re expecting everyone else to pay everything, and assume no burden on your part?

            Reality doesn’t always jibe with one’s Utopian expectations on how the world should run in your mind.  That’s life. Man up, and learn to live with it…

          • bud dry

            I have a college education from a top school, graduated cum laude, and I am working 50 hours a week making $16,000/year after taxes and am $25,000 in debt from school. I am single, it’s enough to get by.  But barely. I think I’ll be ok in the future.  But don’t talk to me like I don’t know what the fuck I’m talking about.

            I don’t have utopian expectations.  But if everyone sat on their ass saying that reality is reality, women wouldn’t have the right to vote or own property, blacks would be slaves, workers would have no right to decent working conditions. 

            My expectation is that when there are enough resources to go around to ensure that everyone is doing ok (think about the billions of dollars corporations are just sitting on, the billions of dollars of income earned by just a few hundred people), we should fight for a reallocation to make that vision a reality.