Occupy Berkeley protest smaller than Occupy Oakland

Occupy San Francisco protesters stand near signs and supplies outside the San Francisco Federal Reserve, on Market Street.
Anna Vinget/Senior Staff
Occupy San Francisco protesters stand near signs and supplies outside the San Francisco Federal Reserve, on Market Street.

Although it drew hundreds to its rally and march Saturday, the Occupy Berkeley protest remains smaller than neighboring Occupy Oakland.

The protest, made up of a motley collection of a few tables and signs in the small courtyard outside the Bank of America on Shattuck Avenue, is in the second week of its existence. The movement began Oct. 8, a week earlier than planned, and at its most populous has seen anywhere from 60 to 80 people in attendance, particularly at its general assembly meetings every evening at 6 p.m., according to protesters. Although protesters began simultaneously occupying Martin Luther King Jr. Civic Center Park Saturday, only a handful have slept there every night.

The Berkeley movement is in stark contrast with the broad expanse of tents, multitudes of tables and plethora of signs that can be found covering the Frank Ogawa Plaza — which the protesters are calling the Oscar Grant Plaza — in Oakland.

The encampment, called the Oakland Commune, is one of two sites taken over by the Occupy Oakland movement, the other located in Snow Park. The Commune, which is made up of around 100 tents, has been in place since Oct. 10, according to the movement’s website.

The site has a considerable amount of infrastructure — committees in charge of various sectors including security, child care, sanitation, first aid and food have been set up, each with a corresponding tent, according to the website.

Both movements come as part of the Occupy movements that are sweeping the world, sparked by Occupy Wall Street, the Wall Street demonstration that began last month and remains ongoing.

Occupy Oakland has planned several upcoming events, including its first mass rally and march set for Nov. 11 and 12, respectively.

“We live in a world where unemployment and staggering levels of debt are the new normal, where poverty and homelessness are met by police violence and incarceration,” the protesters said on the Oakland protest’s website. “The entire global economy is broken, and politicians in the US and elsewhere remain powerless to do anything about it. It’s time to take power into our own hands, to occupy the spaces from which we have been excluded and reclaim everything that has been stolen from us.”

Despite the larger size and greater infrastructure of the Oakland Commune over its counterpart in Berkeley, protesters in Berkeley have chosen to stay, citing various reasons like family, jobs and ties to the city.

Occupiers in Oakland stand in solidarity with Berkeley and the worldwide Occupy movement, according to the movement’s website.

While Occupy Berkeley is still nascent, it too held a rally and march on Oct. 15 as part of an “International Day of Action.

Demonstrations have taken place in solidarity with Occupy Wall Street in cities both in and outside of the United States, including Iowa City, Seattle, London, Berlin and Johannesburg.

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  • Abc

    A waste of time, as you won’t find any of the 1% in Berkeley, they all moved away to clean cities.

    • Anonymous

      Berkeley should consider itself lucky in that case.

  • Grownup

    Who are the off spring of the 1%  that can afford to attend college? 

    It is certainly not those who are peacefully trying to change the status quo.

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_WRACM77JT2RXUR3LMGDPPUGUYY Tony M

    [“We live in a world where unemployment and staggering levels of debt are the new normal"]

    Yet most of these protesters voted for the man in the White House whose economic policies play a large role in this debacle, and even after all of this a recent survey of the Occupy Whatever folks indicates that nearly half of them still plan on voting for his re-election in 2012. Clearly not the sharpest tools in the shed…

    • Anonymous

      You’ve got one sharp tool, and that’s it – you’re nasty tongue.

      • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_WRACM77JT2RXUR3LMGDPPUGUYY Tony M

        What of have I said above that is factually incorrect?

  • Guest

    This glorified hobo camp is yet another reason not to visit downtown Berkeley.

    • Anonymous

      I’m sure they’ll be disappointed that someone as caring and community minded as you won’t be there.   By the way, stay out of Oregon too you loser.

      • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_WRACM77JT2RXUR3LMGDPPUGUYY Tony M

        “Caring” and “community minded” must be the new buzzwords for defending the unemployable and unwashed…

        • Anonymous

          You are a sociopath. That is also factually true. People who don’t understand and acknowledge their connectedness with others are sociopaths. Don’t feel bad, you have lots of company! Just stay out of my universe because you will be seen and exposed as the sociopath you are.

          Love you!! xoxo

          • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_WRACM77JT2RXUR3LMGDPPUGUYY Tony M

            [You are a sociopath.}

            Why, because I dare disagree with your patent silliness?

          • Anonymous

            I am dead serious here. What is going to protect you from your own legitimate fears about life? Get a clue or your ignorance is going to be your undoing. These times call for being able to grasp complex theories of economics and socialization in the context of politics and cultures, and the consequences thereof at current. Start educating yourself. Do you enjoy art?

            I was never a REAL hippie because the “free love” part of it did not work for me. That period was much much more than getting high and having sex. Listen to the music, the protest music in ALL genres, except country music and that has always been God and USA, except in the early years 1930s 40s 50s.

            It just occurred to me that if you are a sociopath these two paragraphs will fall on dead ears. Oh well, can’t blame me for trying!

          • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_WRACM77JT2RXUR3LMGDPPUGUYY Tony M

            [I am dead serious here. What is going to protect you from your own
            legitimate fears about life? Get a clue or your ignorance is going to
            be your undoing. These times call for being able to grasp complex
            theories of economics and socialization in the context of politics and
            cultures, and the consequences thereof at current.]

            Sounds like you’re used to stringing together words without any thought of context or expressing a coherent idea. Thanks for making it clear that in all likelihood you’re some hippie holdover who can’t cut it in the real world…

  • http://www.facebook.com/people/Ahim-Anyd/100002645118503 Ahim Anyd

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    Pentagon’s Secret

  • Econ Law Bonanza

    Bill Black, law and econ prof., former SEC regulator during S&L scandal, ie during the Reagan administration, on why OWS is not a matter of Red v Blue:
    http://neweconomicperspectives.blogspot.com/2011/10/prof-bill-black-and-ows-this-is-not-red.html
    Black argues that we need, “fire Geithner, fire Holder, and demand
    Bernanke’s resignation, and … replace them with people who will
    actually enforce the laws for the 99[%].”
    Calling on CA AG Harris to prosecute bankers for fraud.
    http://neweconomicperspectives.blogspot.com/2011/10/open-letter-to-california-attorney.html

    Yves Smith (author of “Econned”, worked at Goldman Sachs, McKinsey, Sumimoto.)
    Latest from the “Bank of America Death Watch”:
    http://www.nakedcapitalism.com/2011/10/bank-of-america-deathwatch-moves-risky-derivatives-from-holding-company-to-taxpayer-backstopped-depositors.html
    topic set to “destruction of the middle class”:
    http://www.nakedcapitalism.com/category/the-destruction-of-the-middle-class

    Adam Levitin, law prof. at Georgetown:
    “this was done to maximize profits and to enable a housing bubble that
    was hugely profitable to a limited number of financial institutions and
    with extraordinary collateral damage” and
    “those who broke the economy should pay to fix it. And someone needs to go to jail.”
    http://www.creditslips.org/creditslips/2011/10/the-sweep-it-under-the-rug-housing-plan.html

    http://www.washingtonsblog.com
    Anon, it’s beyond left v right, calls for OWS & TP to unite (that’s over the top even for me).
    http://www.washingtonsblog.com/2011/10/if-the-occupy-movement-and-tea-party-join-together-we-can-end-the-malignant-partnership-between-big-government-and-big-corporations-which-is-destroying-america.html

    if you can stand long and involved articles on economics (no math though):
    http://www.creditwritedowns.com/

    • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_WRACM77JT2RXUR3LMGDPPUGUYY Tony M

      [Adam Levitin, law prof. at Georgetown: "this was done to maximize profits and to enable a housing bubble that was hugely profitable to a limited number of financial institutions and with extraordinary collateral damage" and "those who broke the economy should pay to fix it. And someone needs to go to jail."]

      How about Barney Frank and Chris Dodd, who pushed for loans to people who wouldn’t be able to pay them back if interest rates rose or the economy went south? Why aren’t you people protesting their contribution to this mess? Oh, never mind, the Occupy Whatever protesters aren’t interested in facts if they interfere with their anti-capitalism hard left political agenda.

    • Anonymous

      excellent reference links – many thanks!