‘Mapped In Silicon Valley’ helps connect startups

Mapped in Silicon Valley
Uday Mehta/Staff

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Situated in an area of the world that spawns many great ideas and businesses (and far more horrendous ones), UC Berkeley students can often have difficulty making their work stand out in a field of an equally bright colleagues. “Standing out” has been the mantra instilled in the vast majority of us for a long time — starting with (presumably) college applications and culminating … well, never. It’s understandably convoluted to do so when one doesn’t even have the slightest scintilla of sapience as to the work of the competition and their allies. Enter Cal student Adam Remba.

While working away at a summer internship in the far reaches of Tel Aviv, Israel, Remba met Ben Lang, a man who managed to consolidate more than 1,000 startups and their information in his website, which he appropriately titled “Mapped in Israel.” It grew from being merely a location tool to one that granted exposure to companies through agglomeration. As any startup would appreciate, exposure is the cardinal goal. Upon recognizing the practicality of such an endeavor in California, Remba began his personal creation, correspondingly titled “Mapped in Silicon Valley.”

Simple in its execution yet powerful in its purpose, the site offers a map of all the startup-type companies in the Silicon Valley — the vast majority of which are concentrated around Berkeley — and allows one to see basic information, such as tagline, address and website, with a single click. Also available is the option to add your own community. It is very much a community-driven website where registering your startup proves to be a symbiotic relationship. The current function that makes this tool so useful is its organization: It’s guaranteed to let you find others who may be in a similar space to you and open the opportunities for collaboration and the occasional friendly rivalry and to let others find you by virtue of the same process.

Following the mold of pretty much all Berkeley student innovators, Remba is not yet content with the product he has created. Alongside the co-founder and fellow golden bear Eric Katz, he hopes to make his website an outlet that can be used to drive traffic — similar to how his inspiration worked. “Although there are ones for specific communities like Berkeley, San Francisco and Palo Alto,” Remba remarks, “I couldn’t believe there wasn’t one for Silicon Valley.”

The duo hopes to reach a total of 500 startups added to the website by December of this year to match their tagline of helping unite Silicon Valley.

Contact Uday Mehta at [email protected]

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