Pixies frontman to release graphic novel involving porn

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Aurelien Guichard / Creative Commons/File

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The worlds of comics and rock music have coincided many times in the past. Gene Simmons, Claudio Sanchez of Coheed and Cambria, Alice Cooper and My Chemical Romance’s Gerard Way have either written comics or commissioned writers to produce a work based on their music, and Wavves has a comic out. An upcoming addition to this collection of work is Pixies frontman Black Francis’ “The Good Inn,” due next year.

“The Good Inn,” starring a protagonist called Soldier Boy (sadly, we will not see this hero “superman that hoe”), is co-written by Pixies biographer Josh Frank and drawn by surrealist artist Steven Appelby. The book follows Soldier Boy as he navigates “past homicidal gypsies, combative soldiers and porn-peddling peasants, taking refuge in a secluded inn, where he finds himself center stage in the making of the world’s first narrative pornographic film.”

Francis (real name Charles Thompson), whose groundbreaking music with the Pixies is itself a romp through sci-fi and all things weird and off-kilter, seems like the kind of figure to write a story that is heady and cerebral but at the same time centered on a quest to make the porn film.

Personal feelings about Francis’ terrible treatment of original bassist Kim Deal and firing of touring bassist Kim Shattuck aside, the book sounds like an interesting visual journey, sort of like a Chuck Palahniuk story  only if this were a Palahniuk work, it would more than likely be a lot more depraved.

The melding of comics and music isn’t a recent phenomenon, nor is it exclusive between comics and rock — popular singers starring in comics date back to the 50s, when singer Pat Boone appeared in an issue of “Superman’s Girlfriend, Lois Lane,” and The Beatles made some appearances in comics as well. The trend even extends to rap: Legendary Wu-Tang member Ghostface Killah released a miniseries earlier this year based on his album “Twelve Reasons to Die.”

Is there some inherent relationship between comics and music that makes so many musicians drop their mikes or guitars and rush to a computer to belt out a miniseries? Perhaps as a musician focused on rhythm and lyrics and flow, writing a comic — in which words and pictures must flow seamlessly — might come easily. Maybe it’s for the whimsy of writing a comic centered on the creation of narrative porn, whatever a narrative porn is.

Nevertheless, “The Good Inn,” meant to be “a fantastical piece of illustrated fiction based on a yet-to-be-written soundtrack to a movie that doesn’t yet exist,” (Black Francis, where is your mind? Seriously, this makes no sense.) may please Pixies fans and comics readers alike, probably as much as the Pixies’ new single has.

Youssef Shokry covers literature. Contact him at [email protected]