Black Student Union members block Sather Gate on Saturday morning

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Rachael Garner/Staff

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Members of the campus’s Black Student Union blocked Sather Gate on Saturday morning, redirecting Cal Day attendees around both sides of the gate as members protested the current campus climate for black students at UC Berkeley.

After assembling in front of Sproul Hall holding Black Lives Matter signs and speaking into megaphones, the students marched to Sather Gate about 11:30 a.m. For more than an hour, they remained lined up in front of the gate, tying rope across it. By about 1 p.m., they reopened the gate.

“This inconvenience is nothing compared to the inconvenience that black students feel on this campus,” said Myles Santifer, chair of the BSU and a UC Berkeley junior.

Meanwhile, hundreds of people streamed through campus for Cal Day, an annual event held to showcase the campus, particularly to prospective students and parents. Although a few people attempted to push through the gate — one man tripped as he tried to struggle through — most people walked around it.

The protesters allowed people with disabilities and families with young children through. Campus staff members also put up signs in front of the gate with instructions on how to circumvent the gate.

“Peaceful protest, peaceful protest,” the protesters chanted.

In addition to protesting in solidarity with the Black Lives Matter movement, which emerged after police killings of unarmed black men in various places across the country, the students spoke of 10 demands made by the BSU to Chancellor Nicholas Dirks. Released last month, the demands include proposals to hire two full-time black admissions staff members and to rename Barrows Hall to honor Assata Shakur, an activist who has been dubbed a terrorist by the FBI.

Dirks has met with BSU members and responded to the demands in a letter, in which he described ongoing efforts to meet black students’ needs, such as hiring a student-athlete development adviser to work with black athletes. He also emphasized a campus initiative being developed to make broad changes to the campus climate and the numbers of black students and faculty on campus.

BSU members, however, have criticized the Dirks’ response to their demands, which Santifer described as dismissive, and have urged for more immediate action.

Melissa Wen is the executive news editor. Contact her at [email protected] and follow her on Twitter @melissalwen.

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  • concerned Black student

    John, if you can identify these privileges that Black students have it would be great. Many of them have personally experienced racial profiling, police misconduct, and harassment. If being followed everywhere is a privilege, then I’m sure we don’t want those types of privileges.

    • Wazoo2u2

      Let’s see cBs-
      1. likely attending Berkeley for free or very little using special Black/minority only scholarships
      2. likely attending Berkeley while not having anything close to the academic skill set or drive necessary to attend if not Black
      3. likely taking idiot classes/majors like Ethnic Studies, Sociology, etc. rather than Engineering/Math, etc.
      4. likely a ‘student athlete’ taking a watered down schedule of courses from #3
      5. using the vast powers of the race card whenever a challenge like having to take a serious course, occurs.
      6. using the race card in all discussions to silence or demean anyone who disagrees with your endless sense of grievance.
      Is that helpful?

    • John

      You named one of them: they are _students_ at Berkeley! That itself is a form of privilege which so many people don’t have, and it requires and implies further privilege, both in order to get there, and as a result of being there.

      As far as police misconduct and harassment, yeah, duh. That is far worse for black people in the USA.

      But for these particular activists, that’s just a justification for their hostile, self righteous, anti-social behavior.

      • blackalaureate

        john, you’re comparing apples and oranges.

        what is at question is the quality of life for black berkeley students as compared with non-black berkeley students.

        you are concerned with comparing these black berkeley students to non-berkeley students…that’s not at all a part of this topic.

        your argument presumes that black people who aren’t socio-economically disadvantaged aren’t discriminated against.

        chris rock is a black individual who is educated, rich, has not committed a crime, and lives in a great neighborhood…yet he is discriminated against because of his race. he is more privileged than any of those berkeley students. he is more privileged than anyone commenting in this forum, yet he still gets harassed by the cops because he is black.

        • TheOne BillyGunn

          I think a lot of this is simply going on in your head. The White-boogie-man is everywhere, judging you. That’s what intake from your post. You sound like a couple of other young men who struggled with that same boogie man. Telling me how they felt that everybody was judging them because of the color of their skin. I don’t deny that they, and yourself, feel and think this way. But it doesn’t make it an objective truth. You’re having a subjective experience. One of those poor guys actually left to attend a junior college back home where he felt safe. All because he couldn’t get past the color of his skin. What did the other guy do? He self-segregated. He didn’t even try to mix with the rest of us anymore. And when I did see him around with his buddies from the African-American theme dorms it was not a great experience. I don’t know why you have to put black before laureate. Is it because you can’t get past the color of your skin? Everyone gets objectified. It’s a feeling we go through constantly during the day. It may or may not be because of your skin color. Let it go.

          • blackalaureate

            my post to john regarding these berkeley students and chris rock aren’t MY subjective experiences. i’ve said NOTHING about my own life here. i described the experiences of the people being discussed in this article (according to them). i also included the experience of chris rock, a so called “privileged” black person.

            chris rock has privilege.

            chris rock is black.

            chris rock still experiences racial discrimination. he has logged it and photographed it.

            is it all in chris rock’s head too? do his photographs of being pulled over lie?

            hmm..inquiring minds…

          • TheOne BillyGunn

            Sometimes, yes, I do believe the racial thing is real. But I don’t believe the racial thing happens all the time as you may perceive it. That every black person is feeling exactly what you feel I think that’s paranoid delusions. If you self-segregate, like way too many of the students on campus do when they join student groups along ethnic lines, you’re contributing to the problem. My theory is that they join these groups because of an inferiority-complex. They only seem comfortable around their “own” kind. I really do think it’s in your head most of the time.

          • blackalaureate

            it isn’t up to you to believe or disbelieve. you don’t hold the measuring stick of racism as a white person.

            obviously – if you personally do not experience this type of discrimination, you’re not expert to even judge it or talk about it.

          • TheOne BillyGunn

            I view what happened to Chris Rock happens to outstanding citizens of all cultures. I’ve had many a Black, Latino, and Asian officer give me crap because they could. I didn’t immediately jump to the conclusion that it was racially motivated. Chris Rock suffered an inconvenience. Oh my god! Call the media because this is blatant racism. Clearly it’s not. It’s almost like Jews claiming anti-semitism when discussing Israel in a negative light. You are guilty of doing the same.

            So what makes you an expert on racism? Your skin color? Thats rich.

          • blackalaureate

            do you have photographic evidence of cops pulling you over, and do you have records of it happening nearly once a week in a month’s time period like chris rock does?

          • TheOne BillyGunn

            When I lived in the inner-city I was harassed by the police quite often. They were always trying to take our bicycles claiming that we had stolen them, making me put my hands on the hot hood of the car and telling me to keep them there when knowing how hot the metal was. Getting smacked every once in a while because I didn’t react to the officers commands as quickly as he would have wanted. No, these things don’t make me an expert but it does give me experience on the subject. What makes you the expert?

          • blackalaureate

            do you or do you not have the evidence/experiences as i described, regarding chris rock?

            let’s be objective, not subjective.

          • TheOne BillyGunn

            This entire discusion is a subjective enterprise.

          • blackalaureate

            all human experience is subjective, hence, my mockery of your admonition.

          • TheOne BillyGunn

            Well, your mocking skills are sub-par at best.

          • blackalaureate

            apparently it worked, because you just articulated it in the previous post.

          • TheOne BillyGunn

            Yes, it worked terribly.

          • blackalaureate

            you’re still upset by it, so it’s a score as far as i see.

          • TheOne BillyGunn

            If that’s your game, “scoring” points then you’ve already lost. You haven’t changed any minds regarding the high-crime rate amongst blacks or their paranoid delusions regarding the color of their skin. But you scored a point! Not really, I’m not even upset, bro.

          • blackalaureate

            it’s actually just a colloquialism. not that serious.

          • TheOne BillyGunn

            it’s serious enough that you keep coming back here to post even though most posters here do not even take you seriously.

          • blackalaureate

            “it’s not that serious” is a phrase some black people say. it means “not a biggie.” it doesn’t literally mean “serious.”

            hope that helps.

          • TheOne BillyGunn

            I see. I thought it was one of those black people things like saying “ax” instead of “ask”. Thanks for clearing that up.

          • blackalaureate

            no, that’s something completely different. the original pronunciation of words like “ask” from old english was actually reversed and pronounced as “aks.” there are other phonemes from the language that have morphed over time and shifts in language communities.

            pronunciations and phrases aren’t the same thing, in linguistics.

            but that’s good that you’re wondering about it.

          • TheOne BillyGunn

            I’m also wondering about the use of the term “valemtime” instead of “valentine”. Could you elaborate please.

          • blackalaureate

            it was already explained in the previous post. just read it again and you’ll get it.

          • TheOne BillyGunn

            No no, clearly you are much more intelligent than I am and I would be served best by your tutelage.

          • blackalaureate

            you’ve already been served, is the rub.

          • TheOne BillyGunn

            So are you using “served” like black people use it or what it actually means in the dictionary?

          • blackalaureate

            inquiring minds, as i said earlier.

          • blackalaureate

            by the way, chris rock doesn’t live in “the inner city,” and he doesn’t commit petty crimes.

            yet STILL he was profiled more than once in a very short time period. he has it documented.

            can you show the same evidence, as a white man?

          • TheOne BillyGunn

            So do you want the rest of us to disregard the high-levels of crime and violence perpetrated by a disproportionate amount of black people? I’m sorry but that is what high-crime rates associated with any ethnic group will do. Chris Rock just so happens to belong to that ethnic group. We do it the Muslims as well. We have that unfortunate stereotype that they somehow are associated with terrorism some way. It’s the same with Black people. But that’s not societies fault, it’s the communities fault.

          • blackalaureate

            i don’t know who you refer to when you speak of “us” and “we.”

            my original posting about this topic was to john (it wasn’t to you, by the way) and it addressed racial discrimination against those who are wealthy and/or educated.

            you responded without really reading the replies around that topic.

          • TheOne BillyGunn

            “Us” and “we” should be interpreted as society at large. unfortunately you are one of those people I refer to as “they” or “those people” because of your paranoid delusions.

          • blackalaureate

            there are only two people in the current conversation, so it’s a bit silly for you to ask me what i am expecting “society” to think, feel, or believe. i am communicating with YOU, not “society.”

            if there is documentation and hard evidence of a phenomenon, i wouldn’t call that paranoia. chris rock has been pretty clear about proving what has happened to him.

          • blackalaureate

            i’ll ask you again: was it in chris rock’s head when he shared photos of himself being profiled by the police?

            was he making that up?

            does he have an inferiority complex, despite all of his rich man privileges?

          • TheOne BillyGunn

            I don’t know, maybe?but it does seem that you do have a complex to speak of. It’s a prison you’ve made for yourself and eventually you will pass it on/ infect your children with it. For shame.

          • blackalaureate

            oh, now you’re not so sure that chris rock is making it up, and that he’s paranoid like the other black people you knew in college.

            you don’t seem so sure of yourself now.

            interesting.

          • TheOne BillyGunn

            i love the amateurish level of argumentation you present. I can do this all day and not come off as some paranoid unlike yourself. You dismiss what you don’t want to deal with, we all see it in your posts.

          • peepsqueek

            We live in a Country today where most people are of mixed race, mixed cultural heritage, and mixed religious ideologies, as am I, as is our President, the son of a African tribesman, the son of a mixed marriage with no social status, whose father and step father were both Muslim. He is the first President in over fifty years to win the popular vote by over 51%, twice. He rightfully said: “My story could only happen in America”

          • blackalaureate

            which has nothing to do with this thread.

          • peepsqueek

            That is because you do not have a balanced scale in your head.

          • blackalaureate

            a “balanced scale.” ok.

          • TheOne BillyGunn

            Yes it does. It proves that there are no limits to what you can achieve as a black man in America.

          • blackalaureate

            no one claimed that there are limits.

            you should probably read the article first…

          • TheOne BillyGunn

            I did. It was stupid and narrow minded. So now the sphere of discussion has been widened in order to try and make sense of the claims of the article.

          • blackalaureate

            again, no one claimed that there are limits. neither your post nor the other white person’s post has anything to do with the discussion.

            you don’t even know why they held a demo.

          • TheOne BillyGunn

            Wasn’t in support of BLM and also to make demands to change blah blah blah blah blah because some black kids feel blah blah blah blah, blah?

          • blackalaureate

            instead of asking me, you should probably read and find out.

          • TheOne BillyGunn

            So getting tutors for the dumb jocks is going to drastically alter the lives of those terrible students? What will naming a building after someone really do for these same students? Blacks are the most hostile group on campus. Why not write that in the article as well if we are supposedly addressing realities on campus.

          • blackalaureate

            you have access to the internet and you have a computer. all you need to do is train your eyes on the screen and click the hyperlinks.

          • TheOne BillyGunn

            Exactly! But things are so terrible for blacks.

          • blackalaureate

            ad hominems will not sidetrack this conversation. i’m speaking objectively of chris rock’s experiences and the berkeley students’ experiences.

            there is no need for you to attack me and make it personal.

          • peepsqueek

            It is only because you are black (sarcasm intended)

          • blackalaureate

            hey, maybe it is. only he knows for himself.

          • TheOne BillyGunn

            There is nothing personal about it. I recall you “yawning” at some of the remarks posted and in others simply ignoring what you don’t want to hear or believe. That’s not conduct worthy of an academic. Amateurish at best.

          • blackalaureate

            anyway, i have no interest in ad-homs.

            as stated earlier, black people who are “privileged” still experience racial discrimination. that was the original point of the whole thread, which you seem to have missed.

          • TheOne BillyGunn

            Everyone experiences racial discrimination. Asian, Hispanic, White, and even Black people–yes, Black people–also dish it out. You just can’t do anything without forgetting that you’re black and that is your problem.

          • blackalaureate

            the discussion wasn’t about “everyone,” it was about people of privilege who are black.

          • TheOne BillyGunn

            So it’s exclusively a black thing, racism. I wasn’t aware of that. Well excuse me my good man. Let me just throw logic and reason out the window when discussing the black community.

          • blackalaureate

            no, the original poster (john) mentioned privilege in his posting, regarding these black students.

            i’m being pedantic so that you can understand what the actual topic of this particular thread is.

          • TheOne BillyGunn

            The reasons have been given for the profiling of blacks: excessively high violence and crime levels. That you not want to accept that reality for why even rich blacks suffer is your problem.

          • blackalaureate

            there is no high violence or crime on the berkeley campus, to my knowledge.

          • TheOne BillyGunn

            Exactly my point. So why the need for the angry protests at Sather Gate and a list of demands?

          • blackalaureate

            your point was disproven. there is no need to reference “high violence and crime” when speaking of these black students, since they aren’t violent or criminal.

          • TheOne BillyGunn

            It was most certainly not disproven. You just can’t ignore the data compiled year after year. Unfortunately perception is reality. But in this case the perception is backed up by statistics.

          • blackalaureate

            i repeat – these black students aren’t violent, nor is the berkeley campus violent, therefore there is no need to bring up violence in the discussion. the sather gate conflict isn’t even about violence at all (which you failed to read earlier).

          • TheOne BillyGunn

            Did they put their hands on that guy trying to cross through the gate? I believe the answer is yes. That’s assault. That is criminal and violent.

          • blackalaureate

            lol, okay.

          • TheOne BillyGunn

            I’m LOL at your life.

          • blackalaureate

            okay….?

          • blackalaureate

            “So why the need for the angry protests at Sather Gate and a list of demands?”

            try clicking the links in the article and find out.

            read about the issues first.

            i think it’s pretty laughable how you enter these discussion threads completely uninformed.

          • TheOne BillyGunn

            Nope, you’re moving the goal post. Nothing is happening to the black community on campus. You posted that much yourself.

          • blackalaureate

            i did not post the words “nothing is happening to the black community on campus.”

            i said “there is no high violence or crime on the berkeley campus, to my knowledge.” verbatim.

            if you read the accompanying articles and this piece, the students are talking about other issues that affect them, not “high crime and violence” per se. that was YOUR assumption. it’s not what the whole news item is even about.

            lol, you don’t even know why you’re commenting on this thread. you haven’t read about WHY they staged this demo.

          • TheOne BillyGunn

            They are demanding a change to the campus climate because they feel a certain way.

          • TheOne BillyGunn

            You mean their “feelings”.

          • TheOne BillyGunn

            People are wary of pit bulls because of the reputation for violence they are given. The same goes for black people, unfortunately.

          • blackalaureate

            pits are awesome. i’ve known some super sweet ones in my time.

          • TheOne BillyGunn

            I have a pit myself. And great neighbors too. But I don’t call them black because they’re just people to me. Funny how they never mention their skin color.

          • blackalaureate

            you “have” neighbors. that’s wonderful.

  • SpookyGhostWatchingU

    I really need to find out how to join this white privilege club. As a white man, my membership card must have been lost in the mail. I’ve had to take out loans for school, car, and house. I also have to work my butt off to provide for my family and pay off said loans.

    But according to some people on here, I didn’t need to take out those loans. I could have just said that I’m part of the white privilege club and received everything I wanted for free.

    Who knew?

    • John

      Its pretty obvious that white privilege, as a concept, is too often little more than weapon to be used by anti white bigots. This comment section illustrates that.

  • blackalaureate

    no. protests don’t have to look like any particular thing. whatever gets the message across is what works, whether you like it or not.

    • Nunya Beeswax

      The problem, as I see it, is that the message gets eclipsed when you use a tactic like blocking thoroughfares. It’s even worse when you violently resist people who attempt to assert their right to move through the gate. Do you think a single one of those people is going to be sympathetic to your cause? Is it really about getting the message across, or is it about stroking your self-righteous anger?

      • blackalaureate

        that’s your personal opinion, and that’s fine for you to hold it.

        there are lots of different thinkers in the world.

      • blackalaureate

        what is the proper method of protest that gets results as they “should” be obtained, in your view? give a historical example of a form of protest that a majority of people said, “yep, this is the right way to protest. i give it a thumbs up.”

        you can’t do it. even the exalted MLK was harshly criticized for his peaceful protest methods.

        the point is not to satisfy the non-protestor, and to make the non-protestor comfortable.

        to my knowledge, there is not one method that non-protestors unanimously approve. people complain about EVERY form of protest, because change is hard for humans.

  • “Peaceful protest” while crowding, grabbing, and shoving people trying to go about their business.

  • John

    No, but thanks for trying to misrepresent the issues here.

    First, one can be angry about both. Many of us _are_ more angry about injustices to black people and police brutality than we are about this protest. Some of us are even angry about this protest _because_ we are angry about injustices to black people. Idiots have seized control of the ‘black lives matter’ meme and they are running it into the ground.

    And when people have such a poisonous ideology that they think this kind of behavior – shoving a student for being white and for trying to walk directly to class – that is its own problem. We don’t need to compare it to injustices to black people – one doesn’t excuse the other. Both are wrong. In fact, in THIS very situation, we see a demonstration of the ideological framework which SUPPORTS injustices towards black people, being reinforced by the supposedly anti-racist demonstrators.

    People should be angry about the conduct of these protesters.

  • John

    Oh, I see! Doing multiple wrong things can cancel each other out! Cool. By that logic, police should be free to murder people who engage in violent crimes like strong arming a convenience store. Wait a second…..!!

    The unnecessary violence and racist violence of the police in no way excuses these students horrible behavior. The fact that some people think that it does is exactly the problem here.

  • Neighbor

    These declines are good news (although rates for hispanic and black girls are still twice as high as whites) as it has always been my opinion that it is not as much single mothers but very young, immature parents that can lead to a problematic lack of support for kids as they are growing up. Again it is frustrating that the white majority is treated as monolithic in these statistics, as I know this has also been a big problem in poor white communities and I have seen the results. Someone in their mid-twenties or older will be much better equipped to respond appropriately to a child’s needs, will have time to finish school and find work, will be less impatient and resentful at building a life around others needs, etc.

  • Neighbor

    Wow so every time a person passes under the gate a black person dies? yes then he certainly is selfish.

    And his personal life and his wife’s illness and difficulty walking on that occasion should be less of a priority to him than your protest, that you decided to have on that particular day. Otherwise he doesn’t care about your cause at all, eh?

    • John

      Please, do take a good long look at how these so called ‘anti racists’ rationalize this horrible behavior. There is no getting through to them, they are ideologues who have built up an orwellian wall of double-speak and rationalizations.

  • Jason

    This isn’t protesting it is terrorism.

  • jeff

    Here we go again..The blacks taking another stupid position to reinforce their thug mentality..They continue to act in a manner that does nothing but widen the racial divide…Time to stop the “you owe me” and “it ain’t my fault” attitude and start acting like reasonable human beings…Perhaps that is expecting more than they’re capable of doing..

  • oliverclark

    I’m not sure why blocking the way to class would somehow raise sympathy. Yeah, black people still face racism. Doesn’t justify the stupidity of this protest.

  • TheOne BillyGunn

    I’ll gladly own up to my mistakes and this time will be no different. I spoke in error.

    • Angela Shortt

      I most definitely respect that, and I will do the same.

  • Mortimer Post

    Goddamned shvartzebastards!

  • Pat Hunter

    As a former Berkeley undergraduate student I can assure the non-Berkeley public that Black students (or any person of color, including myself) are treated with the utmost respect in the classroom, on the field, in the lab, at the grocery store, restaurant, anywhere. Student protesters wrongly accused Birgeneau of tuition hikes when they should have been blaming Sacramento and the state legislature for misdirection of educational funds. They got him ousted from office. Don’t get the wrong guy again! Dirks has already raised extraordinary funds for the university. He has improved the administration’s culture and has effectively created an inclusive community for underrepresented minorities and other disadvantaged groups.

    It baffles me that protesters propose ludicrous demands. Rename Barrows Hall? Seriously? How are you going to establish credibility and actually convince people there is an actual problem with racial discrimination in Berkeley like that? Good luck.

    • John

      > Black students (or any person of color, including myself) are treated
      with the utmost respect in the classroom, on the field, in the lab, at
      the grocery store, restaurant, anywhere.

      Wait…that doesn’t fit my biased, politically motivated worldview; so I will ignore your testimony and manufacture my own evidence. Oh, do I love feeling self righteous.

      > How are you going to establish credibility and actually convince people
      there is an actual problem with racial discrimination in Berkeley like
      that?

      Well said. The communities in which these folks have power have a completely different standard for ‘credibility’. It might be because they are young?

    • concerned Black student

      The campus climate survey stated the over 40% of Black students on campus have personally experienced some form of racial hostility, and over half feel uncomfortable on campus. Pat, I don’t know when you graduated, but if those are the metrics now, I’m sure they were not better when you attended Cal. Please, ask 15 of your Black friends from Cal (if you have that many) if they have ever experienced racial discrimination on campus or nearby.

  • Mark Talmont

    It has been far from a small inconvenience to the citizens of California and the Bay Area in particular to watch the integrity of just about everything the government does be degraded by the ham-fisted application of your “affirmative action” schemes. You are the ones who ought to be ashamed.

    Just one instance:
    though the official versions may be sanitized, the fact is the horrific Oakland Hills fire disaster of 1991 had everything to do with these policies. The Oakland Fire Department had been riven with litigation over race-based hiring and promotion for years, coincidentally a new “minority” fire chief had just been installed (an inexperienced 38-year-old from New Jersey) 10 days before the holocaust. That fire happened because of the idiotic decision to leave hoses in place–but NO personnel–at the site of a “hot spot” from the day before, this in the worst fire danger conditions ever. A demoralized and dissension-riddled department cost 25 people their lives.

    • Angela Shortt

      As a former Air Force brat and the daughter of Air Force loadmaster who was nearly shot in the head while flying over Vietnam, which was a war that history has proven that we should refrained from, I can assure you that there has PLENTY of demoralization and dissension and incompetence in every branch of our government, not just in Oakland. Sure, the city has its issues. But if you start with the Fire Department, you need to work your way all the way through to the Mayor’s office. There’s plenty of blame and accusations of corruption that could and should be evenly spread around.

  • Mark Talmont

    Don’t forget selection bias. The smartest Asians sprinted for the USA the instant the immigration laws changed in 1965. They were the pioneers in birthright citizenship too.

    • peepsqueek

      Today we are talking about their children. My point is that the difference is in education, family values, and cultural dynamics. It is not because they looked different and did not have command of the language that made them successful.

      We live in a Country today where most people are of mixed race, mixed cultural heritage, and mixed religious ideologies, as am I, as is our President, the son of a African tribesman, the son of a mixed marriage with no social status, whose father and step father were both Muslim. He is the first President in over fifty years to win the popular vote by over 51%, twice. He rightfully said: “My story could only happen in America”

      • Nancy Fifield

        I agree, that is why this whole racism business is starting to get old. We are ALL blended together and the majority of us are not first generation immigrants. We should have equal command of the language, especially if we went to school here. We all have the same opportunities, no matter what area we grew up in. Sorry, there are slums and there are mountains in the Appalachians and there is everything inbetween. No one forces someone to join a gang or to become a criminal. No one forces someone to sound uneducated and like a gangsta or a redneck. I grew up with 13 people in my class and surrounded by the woods. Did I have the same opportunities as the bigger schools as far as sports and clubs, etc? No, but I did for an education and I took advantage of that. Everyone has the same opportunity for an education. Life is what YOU choose it to be and the results of it are your own making. You can’t blame everyone else for how you turn out! Take responsibility for your own character and self-worth. I think that is where some of the differences and success stories between cultures come in to play. So yes, everyone is equal and only in America can people make themselves into whatever they want to be by hard work and determination!

        • peepsqueek

          I have to partially disagree, as many people are traumatized at an age, maybe they don’t get enough nutrition, or dealing with drug and alcohol effected parents. Children can be robbed of all enthusiasm for life at an early age, and the gang is the only ones that give them approval for their angry out let. Young people like this growing up in poverty have a huge burden to overcome through no fault of their own. My point is that there is a formula for success and a formula for failure, which is not 100%, but the statistics are on your side if you play by the rules. The blame game will not resolve the problem. It is not your fault or the Government’s fault, so I agree with you in the aspect that making it all race specific is self defeating. Parents, teachers, and clergy have to reinforce these messages, and not victimhood. The Government cannot fix it.

        • concerned Black student

          The flaw in your argument, is acknowledging that the concentrated poverty and anguish exists and not interrogating that deeper. Concentrated poverty and crime is a direct result of intentional discrimination and social isolation. Poor folks, more specifically poor Black folks, do not have certain resources because of a very specific design to keep these communities without the material means for upward mobility. For example, you stated that you took advantage of an education. How many of your classmates didn’t? Now, the “bigger schools” you spoke about with more resources, why is it that more of them just so happen to “take advantage of their education?” Racial and class inequality is not a mistake, and without a serious interrogation of American history, you will miss the obvious patterns. Respond to this if you would like a reading list.

  • Nunya Beeswax

    Regardless of whether the inconvenience is small or great (and, fyi, you don’t get to decide that for others), it’s an inconvenience you don’t have the right to impose. That’s the crux of the issue, and I find it very sad that it apparently eludes you completely.

  • M2000

    Are they doing a racist salute there?

  • concerned Black student

    Sir, I’m sorry for your discontent. We allowed everyone with a physical disability to pass, so if you and your wife had walking problems, we would have let her through. We are not about oppressing people. If you would have spoken to us, we would have let you pass with your wife as an escort.

    Also, I’m sure you are a red-blooded American. I wonder if anyone in the revolutionary war asked for a permit. or anyone of the jews who escaped the holocaust asked to leave. Harriet Tubman did not ask to lead enslaved Africans to freedom, and MLK JR. only used a permit once. I’m sorry, but asking for permission just is not the American way. Legal doesn’t always make right.

    Finally, why does this make you so mad? If you understand our cause, then why does this upset you so much? Is it because you had to listen to Black people? Is it because you were told “no?” Please, be as honest as possible.

    • DNAC101

      Most people didn’t listen to you. I say this as a POC and black student. Most people just walked around you. I’m sure some engaged you. But you give yourself way too much credit. And please speak in terms of you representing some black people. Because since we black people are not monolithic speaking in such terms as if we are is a problem.

      I’ve lost three extended family members to since-less violence. No one in my family makes excuses for the behaviors they or others engaged in that ended their lives.

      I’m also concerned about the black genocide happening through abortions.

      So when the Black Lives Matters movement includes abortion and black-on-black crime along with police brutality. You can can count me in. I don’t see that happening anytime soon.

      Until then, i’m working with my fellow black people who GET IT and are engaging in the kinds actions and activities that have impact on people daily lives rather than protesting to swing people’s attention who mostly don’t care.

      • Neighbor

        The black population in the US is growing. There has been an explosion of births to teenage, usually unwed mothers. There is no such thing as black genocide by abortion in the US, and black women, like all women, deserve control over their own bodies.

        • Neighbor

          Further, stats someone posted on the thread show that abortion rates are going down along with teen pregnancy rates since the 1990s. Compared to whites though, teen pregnancy rates are twice as high in blacks.

      • concerned Black student

        The Black Lives Matter movement is concerned with addressing the conditions that make abortion and “Black on Black” crime necessary. State facilitated poverty and a for profit penal system orchestrate the very problems you bring up. People have been doing that work for some time now, and if you are interested in doing that work, then I would suggest you find an organization near you and start doing it, the same way that most of the students in that picture are doing.

    • John

      > We allowed everyone with a physical disability to pass

      No, no you did not – because you are not omniscient.

    • John

      > If you understand our cause, then why does this upset you so much?

      Because most people who support actions like these are so full of themselves and their rhetoric that they are no longer capable of having a balanced perspective or a constructive conversation.

  • TheOne BillyGunn

    No mam, I intend to engage with you honestly and with no malice in my heart. The issue with BlackLivesMatter is that they seem to exclusively focus on white-on-black crime, Primarily white-officer on black-civilian violence, while claiming that all black lives matter and that simply isn’t true. The only black lives they’re worried about are the lives which can be used to stir up division between the different ethnic groups. These people don’t want solutions, they seek confrontation. They’re waiting to loot the stores. We see it regularly on the evening news. Use a name which truly represents what your objective is. In this case violence. The protest can be effective without resorting to anger and intimidation but I claim that this is the true purpose of this movement.

    The role of black-on-black crime in my argument is to demonstrate the culture of violence prevalent in the black community. It is undeniable. A culture of irresponsibility is truly what I mean. Fathers ignoring their responsibilities to their children, making of them bastards. Teenage-pregnancy is another major problem for your community. Who’s fault is that? Every other ethnicity seems to be progressing ahead of the black community. Every other ethnic group has gotten past the color of their skin except for you guys. Yes, racism is alive and well in America, especially in the black community. You know what I’m talking about. In any case, you aren’t being lynched anymore, you can find work wherever you please, nothing is in your way. stop living in the past.

    • Angela Shortt

      It’s interesting that you pull out these racial talking points without seeing that you are focusing on a segment of the Black population that has been disenfranchised in the urban centers of large cities after migrating to the major cities in the North and the West, and ignoring a large group of people like my family, who emphasized getting an education and having a career were on a daily basis. We are not the exceptions. The Black middle class increased exponentially after the Civil Rights movement, which is when I grew up, and it has only been recently that the Black middle class has experienced a reversal in numbers, along with other American families.

      Somehow, we are invisible. When Whites discover that people like my family did not live in “ghettos”, but in suburban homes just like them, they are sometimes taken aback. My family’s reality, and that of other Black people’s lives, apparently do not match their perception. People migrated from the South with two burning desires in their hearts: to get away from the domestic terrorist practices of Jim Crow, and to earn a decent living so they can lift themselves out of poverty. They DID NOT want welfare, or anything else from the government. They simply wanted to work and provide for their families. The promise of good paying jobs in the big cities of up North and out West is why so many settled there. But to their dismay, it was an unfulfilled promise. Low paying, menial labor jobs were all that they could find, and housing was unavailable everywhere except the in most run down parts of the cities, which was accomplished through red lining rental and mortgage practices. The initial generation of Southern immigrants were disillusioned, but they figured it was better than old Jim Crow. Their children didn’t have the Southern way of life as a basis of comparison, and over the years, the lack of job opportunities and other discriminatory practices led to seething resentment.

      And where there is poverty and limited upward mobility (some did prosper, just enough to make White politicians point out the “credits to their race”), there is also the opportunity to find other ways to make money, usually through illicit means. This is not limited to Black people living in the large cities of the United States; this occurs wherever people have to struggle economically. Drugs, prostitution, arms and human trafficking thrive in the countries that were once part of the USSR, and in Asia, the Middle East and Africa. The common denominator is lack of education and upward mobility. People are creative. They will develop ways of making a living, even if it involves killing their family members, friends and neighbors. Does anyone pontificate about Chinese on Chinese crime, or Russian on Russian crime? Why not? The only difference is race. The stifling poverty, lack of education, proliferation of low paying, menial jobs and social stigmatization and marginalization of all of these groups is appallingly similar, except when they migrate to the United States. Then, they can adopt the “at least we’re not like those Blacks” perspective. And while precious few of them will ever rise to the heights of the 1 percent, at least they are doing better they did in their homelands, and certainly better than “the lazy Blacks” living here in America . Again, it’s the caste system in play.

      At some point, Whites and other people who have been drinking the caste system Kool-Aid are going to have to realize that these beliefs about the people of African descent who have been living in North America for the past 500 years are human beings just like them. That’s a simple idea, yet seemingly unattainable at present. We have ambitions and hopes for the future of their families just like everyone else in this country, and there ARE enough opportunities and resources in this country to allow any able bodied (or even disabled) mentally capable person with a fulfilling occupation in which their particular skill set will be valued. I am convinced of this. It is the perception of “not enough for everyone” that perpetuates the caste system. Abre los ojos. Open your eyes,

      • TheOne BillyGunn

        I am focusing on them intentionally. These are the same people behind Blacklivesmatter and that is why the protests always turn violent. My issue is with these people and not every black person under the Sun. It sounds as if you are saying that these types of people should be allowed to react as they do because of what has happened in the past. I understand the anger and resentment which these people feel and if they want to engage society angry and violent then please do so. But don’t try and make it about black lives when it’s really about retribution.

        I’ve had the privilege of working with fine black people. I won’t say Afro-American anymore because all black people are not from Africa. The one thing that comes out of their mouths when they talk about American blacks is that they are lazy. They make sure to distinguish themselves as Jamaican, Haitian, Ecuadorean, because of the low opinion they have of American-Blacks. This is not an accurate picture, of course. I’m sure there are far more outstanding people in the black community than there are bad, and you don’t have to be middle-class to be a good person. Being part of the middle-class says nothing about the character of the person. A person is defined by his or her actions. Many people have found themselves going through hard times but we are responsible for our own actions whether good or bad. Certain crimes are inexcusable no matter the context. I’m just going to come out and say it: your caste system excuse for the ills plaguing the black community has little weight. consider the stupendous success many black people have experienced. Sports, music, and entertainment are just some of the fields where black people have basically dominated the enterprise. It seems that the sky truly is the limit for these individuals who just happen to never bring up the color of their skin as often as other less successful people and always attribute their success to dedication and hard work.

        What went on at Sather Gate was nothing to be proud of. What most people took away from that experience was not positive and therefore the message is not well received. If actual solutions are the goal, then the strategy needs to change.

        • Angela Shortt

          “I am focusing on them intentionally. These are the same people behind Blacklivesmatter and that is why the protests always turn violent. My issue is with these people and not every black person under the Sun. It sounds as if you are saying that these types of people should be allowed to react as they do because of what has happened in the past. I understand the anger and resentment which these people feel and if they want to engage society angry and violent then please do so. But don’t try and make it about black lives when it’s really about retribution.”

          I thank you for your honesty, because you have arrived at the heart of the matter, and wrote what few White people have had the fortitude to state openly. As a White person, you perceive the #BlackLivesMatter movement as “retribution”. And that’s not the perspective of MOST of the protestors, including the White, Latino, Asian and Native people who have also protested with the #BlackLivesMatter movement. It’s justice. Why do you think they chant “no justice, no peace”? They don’t mean they are going to take up arms and start a bloody insurrection! They mean they intend to march and disrupt the business as usual: Oh, too bad, so sad, but that Black boy was a criminal and deserved to die on the street without the benefit of having a right to attorney and going to jail. And this: “#BlackLivesMatter is about protecting criminals who kill other Black people and destroy neighborhoods.” That is a completely SEPARATE issue, a red herring in the discussion.

          This is about police who use unspoken but very much acted upon fear of “superhumanly strong, aggressive and lethally violent” (or worse adjectives and derogatory terms) Black people. (The quotes represent a summation of the years I’ve heard or read about what White people sincerely believe about us.) You, and many other White people love to tell Black people “to get our own houses in order”. Do you have any idea how paternalistic that reads? I know you can’t help it; you and yours are probably unaware of how this appears to Black people. And when it is pointed out, what is your reaction? “Oh, I’m just a White person, I don’t know what I’m talking about!”, or some other form of indignation. (Again, that is a summation of the comments I’ve read and statements I’ve heard over the years.)

          Truthfully, I can understand that response. No one likes to be told that they are wrong about their perspective of situations. It’s a blow to the ego. Extremely unpleasant when a person is the recipient of those observations, and I can only imagine that it is twice the insult when, as a whole, most Whites do believe that you are supposed to lead not only this country, but the world. The problem with being large and charge all the time is fear. You might not personally feel that you are that because there are plenty of people who throw the hammer down on you, bosses, bill collectors, the government officials, etc. Nevertheless, you do feel that even though you aren’t in charge of everything, there are parts of you that are superior to those criminal acting Blacks. Let’s face it, I am aware that I am only one step away from being one of “those Blacks” in your opinion because I am an educated professional who meets with your approval. I’ve passed your, “that’s a decent Black person” test. I never asked for your approval, nor do I want it. What I really want is your honesty. Are you afraid of Black people who live here in America? Why? Have you EVER bothered to ask yourself that question? I’m not picking on you specifically. I’m asking this, as a born and bred citizen of the United States of America who ancestors were brought here against their will and managed to survive all that so I can BE HERE, to examine your thoughts and emotions about this.

          You, and other White people, tell us to “clean up our neighborhoods”. In my opinion, that’s not what we need to do. We need to continue to press on for justice, and refuse to respond to violence with more violence directed toward our fellow citizens who are White. I know it probably rankles you that we are so stubbornly defiant. But that response has its origins in a deeply held “seemingly inherent sense of superiority”, as a keen observer who was neither Black or White once wrote. (His name was Shoghi Effendi, if you are interested in knowing that.) We can see this, and we often respond in ways that you don’t like. However that can change, and I’m not talking about Black people taking over the country and the world. That’s another unconscious fear, which is something all of you have to deal with. We want to live in this country and the world peaceably, and whether you believe that or not isn’t important. We want to have the ability to work when we demonstrate that we are qualified for a job, and be judged by our abilities, not any preconceptions or latent fears,. We want to be able to live to rent or buy homes without any secret back door red lining practices limiting our choices. And we want to raise our families, and know that every single school in every neighborhood has quality instruction so that our children and grandchildren will be prepared for their careers. That, in a nutshell, is what the #BlackLivesMatter is ultimately striving for. As long as we are looked upon as inhumanly strong, mentally defective and overly promiscuous sub group of humans, the fear -based justification for killing us before we have the ability guaranteed by law to retain legal counsel who will gather the facts of each case and present them fairly to a jury of our peers, will continue to a contentious issue between us.

          And, we need to deal with our own issues of anger and resentment toward all of you. For me, and more than likely for other Black people too, that is a difficult concept to process. I’m not fond of it, but I recognize the necessity of doing it. I believe that each and everyone of us has to go through the purging of these negative emotions so we will be able to see situations objectively and press on for justice from a position of peace-based calm and confidence instead of negative emotionally based reactions.

          And I’m not talking about “Tomming out”. I’m talking about focusing on facts instead resentments, calm instead of anger. For those of you who are young and Berkeley students, I know that’s hard for you to do, especially since the school has a history of being the center of protests not only for civil rights, but also women’s rights and against the Vietnam War. It’s a tradition. But that was then, and those protests helped usher some changes, but not enough. This is my opinion, nothing more: It’s time to do things differently, think and feel differently about these issues. When you young people get to that place, you’ll lead the rest of the nation, even old folks like me.

          • Neighbor

            ” as a whole, most Whites do believe that you are supposed to lead not only this country, but the world.” I don’t think most whites think that! There is a lot of mind reading going on and I think you are being selective in the things you remember. maybe you are also ‘not hearing’ responses that don’t fit your preconceptions.

            I am also tired of the inevitable speech about how if I disagree in any way (such as with the exclusive focus on racism as a driver and cause of police brutality, the drug war, the encroaching police state etc) with the views of a black person I am “uncomfortable” and not used to being uncomfortable I am “understandably upset” But I need to “look in the mirror” and “do the work” and so on – NO ONE likes being patronized, so why expect whites to accept it? This is where the suspicions of retribution come in at least for me.

          • Angela Shortt

            I’ve proven my point. Now you know how I feel, and probabl other Black people living in this country. Can we move on, now?

          • Angela Shortt

            Perfect. Now you know how I have experienced for the past 50+ years of my life. You’re right; no one likes to be patronized. You don’t, and I never have. The difference is this type of treatment has been part of my life since I walked into kindergarten as the first Black child in the school back in 1963. So, can we at least come to an agreement that being patronized sucks?

          • Neighbor

            Exactly. No sympathy because you experienced it in the past and since I am white I obviously never have (yeah right) so it’s a GOOD THING that I am “uncomfortable” because you are now doing it to me. it’s retribution. YOU just proved MY point. Of course it sucks and your belief that I only just now realized it is bizarre. Let me know when you get over the desire to see white people suffer. Maybe then we can move forward but not before.

          • Angela Shortt

            That’s your interpretation. Actually, I would have preferred that you felt a tiny bit of empathy. Not sympathy because I don’t need that. Empathy is different. When I posted that I understood how you felt, and no one likes to be patronized, that’s what I was expressing, empathy. But you assumed that I wanted you to suffer. Well, that’s a different take on the comment. Do you fear some kind of massive Black insurrection? If so, your retribution fantasies are groundless; it’s not going to happen. If that scenario were at any time possible, it would have taken place during the Civil Rights movement. And of course, it didn’t, and for very good reasons that are still relevant today. There is tremendous surplus of military grade weaponry in this country, and the thought of initiating its use and making ourselves the targets of those very real weapons of mass destruction violates the practice of common sense because the slaughter that would ensue would be cataclysmic. Not only that, the United States’ allies and enemies would unite to would denounce such an action against United States’ citizens with outcries of hypocrisy concerning civil rights violations. We the people shouldn’t want any of that. Let’s keep America beautiful.

          • Neighbor

            ” But you assumed that I wanted you to suffer.”
            because you said essentially “good-now you know how I have felt since kindergarten” as if a lower class woman from a poor immigrant family has no idea how it feels to be patronized.

            “Do you fear some kind of massive Black insurrection?”
            Good lord get a grip woman! That’s an extremely paranoid interpretation. I simply do not want to be treated disrespectfully and I will accept that treatment from no one. I refuse to make exceptions for black people.

            Submitting to disrespect and condescension is not normal or healthy behavior. Insisting that white people put up with it or be subject to more abuse “Oh so you don’t like being ‘uncomfortable’? Now you know how it feels! Why should I be sympathetic for your White Lady Tears?” and so on is unreasonable and frankly, childish.

          • Angela Shortt

            I wrote about empathy. You choose to interpret that one sentence as an attack, when it wasn’t intended to be one. However, I do understand that how you interpret my words is your business, not mine. I had no malicious intent. Yes, I am blunt. That’s me. I don’t water down anything, but that doesn’t mean I wish you to “suffer”.

            I can see your point of view. I’ve said that before. And yet, you continue to see that I am trying to get you to feel bad. The word is empathy. That was the goal. Since that didn’t work out well, let’s see if we have anything in common. You came from an immigrant family. So did I. My parents came from the Deep South, which is VERY different from the places I grew up. Sometimes my parents embarrassed me with their “southernisms”, and their different ways of doing things, like how my mother would lift up fruit in the commissary, examine it closely, smell it deeply, and if she frowned, she wouldn’t buy it. I never saw any other mother doing that, and I was mortified when she did it. But her father, my Granddaddy Buddy, followed the seasons picking fruit up and down the East coast She learned how to pick the sweetest fruit from him. Or how my father expected us to squat by the side of the road instead of driving us to the next gas station when we were on road trips.

            Like many immigrant parents, mine wanted their children to excel in school, and show no evidence of their Southern roots.. We did that. And yes, I felt very much out of place as the only Black child in most of my classes until I got to junior high school. The ONLY differences between you and I (besides race) is that my father was a noncommissioned officer in the United States Air Force until my sophomore year in high school, and we weren’t poor. Other possible differences: I was a tomboy who loved playing tackle football (especially defense) with the boys, I won every fight I ever got into (and I never fought girls). I was heavier and taller than the other kids until I reached the 6th grade. The boys seemed to begin to grow overnight by that time, which was disheartening to me. And they wouldn’t let me play football anymore, either.

            I apologize for the hyperbole; I do love to exaggerate from time to time. But the image of Nat Turner’s bloody revolt against slave owners is one of those collective unconscious pictures, even amongst people who have no idea who Nat Turner was. I’m guilty of poking on a cultural wound that has never healed, and I guess it won’t in the near future.

          • Neighbor

            Sorry I think you are back pedaling here. You are still making me out to be overly sensitive ad you are not really apologizing. You said ” Perfect. Now you know how I have experienced for the past 50+ years of my life. You’re right; no one likes to be patronized. You don’t, and I never
            have. The difference is this type of treatment has been part of my life
            since I walked into kindergarten as the first Black child in the school
            back in 1963.”
            And for the record my father worked two manual jobs so we could go to a suburban school and have a place to play outdoors. You think we fit in and that I don’t have issues? Because I was white? My hand-me-downs and rotten teeth went un-noticed? Or perhaps I do have issues, but you have more, so it’s okay to lecture me and patronize me? Sorry I am not backing down from this. People complain that lower class whites don’t want to ally with blacks because we want to be superior. Yet the truth is when we try to discuss what we have in common (A LOT) we have to deal with “you don’t know nothing about oppression” Screw that.

          • Angela Shortt

            I wrote about empathy. You choose to interpret that one sentence as an attack, when it wasn’t intended to be one. However, I do understand that how you interpret my words is your business, not mine. I had no malicious intent. Yes, I am blunt. That’s me. I don’t water down anything, but that doesn’t mean I wish you to “suffer”.

            I can see your point of view. I’ve said that before. And yet, you continue to see that I am trying to get you to feel bad. The word is empathy. That was the goal. Since that didn’t work out well, let’s see if we have anything in common. You came from an immigrant family. So did I. My parents came from the Deep South, which is VERY different from the places I grew up. Sometimes my parents embarrassed me with their “southernisms”, and their different ways of doing things, like how my mother would lift up fruit in the commissary, examine it closely, smell it deeply, and if she frowned, she wouldn’t buy it. I never saw any other mother doing that, and I was mortified when she did it. But her father, my Granddaddy Buddy, followed the seasons picking fruit up and down the East coast She learned how to pick the sweetest fruit from him. Or how my father expected us to squat by the side of the road instead of driving us to the next gas station when we were on road trips.

            Like many immigrant parents, mine wanted their children to excel in school, and show no evidence of their Southern roots.. We did that. And yes, I felt very much out of place as the only Black child in most of my classes until I got to junior high school. The ONLY differences between you and I (besides race) is that my father was a noncommissioned officer in the United States Air Force until my sophomore year in high school, and we weren’t poor. Other possible differences: I was a tomboy who loved playing tackle football (especially defense) with the boys, I won every fight I ever got into (and I never fought girls). I was heavier and taller than the other kids until I reached the 6th grade. The boys seemed to begin to grow overnight by that time, which was disheartening to me. And they wouldn’t let me play football anymore, either.

            I apologize for the hyperbole; I do love to exaggerate from time to time. But the image of Nat Turner’s bloody revolt against slave owners is one of those collective unconscious pictures, even amongst people who have no idea who Nat Turner was. I’m guilty of poking on a cultural wound that has never healed, and I guess it won’t in the near future.

          • TheOne BillyGunn

            I don’t have a “decent black person test”. I am really sorry that you still live with the trauma of growing up during a bad time in our country. But things are different now. Maybe not for you because childhood memories last a lifetime and you can’t help but hold the views which shaped much of your life. I support the NAACP. I don’t support BLM. The difference being that one group wants to advance persons of color in society while the other wants violent retribution for the most part. Upon entering any room, I don’t think of people as black, yellow, or brown. I just don’t. Ignorance is ignorance regardless of color.

      • Neighbor

        “. My family’s reality, and that of other Black people’s lives, apparently do not match their perception.”

        Don’t activists who always emphasize black poverty contribute to this?

        Also my understanding is that blacks were continually making it into the middle classes throughout the 20th century, not just after the civil rights movement. I know you specified the growth was ‘exponential’ but that encourages the stereotype that all blacks were poor and living under Jim Crow etc so yes it is often startling to see examples to the contrary.

        Your comments are very interesting you should have a blog! Or do you?

  • Angela Shortt

    It’s interesting and informative that you called the students “thugs” instead of protesters. Very enlightening that you referred to well worn trope that is used to describe Black people more and more on social media. Since when did college students become “thugs”, and do you apply the same description to White fraternity members who rape women on campus or refer to Black people as the “N” word? Please don’t be insulting and say yes, you would call them “thugs”. At least consider the many different ways your mind classifies people, and recognize how easy it is to use that noun. Your post speaks to the heart of the problem, which I’m sure in your agitated state, you cannot perceive. Just to let you know, I am disabled. I understand the difficulties of navigating Berkeley’s campus very well. I would have been in excruciating pain simply detouring around the protest, and I wouldn’t have been able to get through the creek at all. But the word “thug” wouldn’t have entered my mind to describe those young people. Instead, I would have asked the officers to let me ask one of the young people to escort me through the protest. The officers probably wouldn’t have let me, but I know one of the young people would have been more than happy to help me. Why? Because they have done so NUMEROUS times on the streets of Berkeley and Oakland, always without me asking them. They have pushed my wheelchair across the street even I told them, “oh no, baby, it’s all right; this is my exercise!” Their response was always something like, “No ma’am, I can’t do that; my mother taught me to always help people”, or “My mother (or another relative) has to use a wheelchair, too, so I’m used to doing this.” You’ve never seen young Black people act like that? Of course not. Your eyes are trained to always see “thugs”.

    • s randall

      Maybe, just maybe you are treated differently than a white woman with no obvious disability.

      I’m sure there will be more kids going to UCLA this year too.

      • Angela Shortt

        LOL! A White woman, or a woman of any race with no obvious disability wouldn’t need help crossing the street. Neither did I, really. But I appreciated the kindness and the intent. And for the record, I have seen Black young people help more than disabled Black women. Again, abre los ojos. Everyday courtesy happens all around you, and it isn’t only White people who have it. Some of us had it drilled into us by our parents, but you wouldn’t know about that, would you? You see what you have been conditioned to see. I can acknowledge the kindness of people of ALL RACES. Can you do the same?

        • Guest

          “I can acknowledge the kindness of people of ALL RACES.” You are a liar!

          • Angela Shortt

            Based on what evidence? You don’t know me.

        • s randall

          You are ignoring the context. Racial “profiling” works both ways. I can certainly acknowledge the kindness of people of ALL RACES, but I can also say that I’ve seen the opposite.

          The claim elsewhere is that people with disabilities and young children were allowed to pass. This man says otherwise. I’m sure if anyone had bothered to video the blockade, there would be evidence that says otherwise too.

          No offense, but you don’t seem that sympathetic to that man’s wife’s condition. You read past what you want see what you want to see. There’s a lot of that going around isn’t there?

          • Angela Shortt

            And did you read the part about me being disabled, and how I know how difficult it is to traverse that campus? What, I didn’t use my words the way you wanted me to? Should I have apologized for the protesters actions to demonstrate that I am worthy of your approval? What do you want me to say?

          • s randall

            I know you understand.

          • Angela Shortt

            Tell me something: if I racially profiled you, how would I or anyone other Black person do this? And how would this affect your employment, your station in life, your current living situation? I know your feelings might be hurt, and you wouldn’t like that. But how would any of those aspects of your life be damaged, assuming that I have the power to racially profile you in the first place. You see, calling someone a derogatory name is different from driving down the street after a long day at work and grocery shopping with three teenagers and a carload of groceries because the car “looked like one that was used during a violent crime.” All right, but how many people commit a crime and go grocery shopping with their kids? I suppose it’s possible, but unlikely. This happened to me years ago. And if I had said the wrong thing or moved the wrong way, my life and the lives of my children would have been altered drastically. This was made very apparent to me. As it turns out, the suspects they were looking for had already been arrested, and they were two Latino men, not a Black woman with her kids and groceries from Safeway. Perhaps it was an honest mistake. But it didn’t feel that way when I was asked to get out of the car with my hands up. It was a good thing my license, registration and insurance were all up to date.

          • s randall

            Believe it or not, everyone everyone is wary around cops. Human nature draws some people that love the power and fear that the job provides.

            So what did that woman on chemo do to you and your family that gives you to right to say it’s OK to disrespect her?

          • Angela Shortt

            Point out where I wrote about her disrespectfully. Was it this part? “Just to let you know, I am disabled. I understand the difficulties of navigating Berkeley’s campus very well. I would have been in excruciating pain simply detouring around the protest, and I wouldn’t have been able to get through the creek at all. ” That qualifies as disrespect to you? Well, too bad. You’re obviously trolling for a fight. Sorry. I’m not giving you one.

          • Nancy Fifield

            Actually, I took offense at when you said that no white woman or woman of any race with an invisible disability would need help crossing the street. That is one of the problems with invisible illnesses. Just because other people can not SEE them does NOT mean that we do not suffer, not matter what the color of our skin or our economic status is. Some days, you bet your bottom dollar I need help crossing a street but you can’t see my illnesses. People just look at me and judge incorrectly on what they believe to be true.

          • Angela Shortt

            Here’s what I wrote, which was a response to what s. randall wrote: “A White woman, or a woman of any race with no obvious disability wouldn’t need help crossing the street.” At issue is whether or not the thought the people who helped me across the street would have helped a White woman with no obvious disability. I based my response on my own experiences and of others I have observed when I am in public. If people can’t see a disability, they aren’t inclined to help someone across the street.

            I have an adult child who has epilepsy with grand mal seizures. That disability is not obvious until the seizures begin, which they do at any time and anywhere. Anyone with uncontrolled seizures suffers mightily, but to look at my child, you wouldn’t know that. He looks perfectly healthy. And he has been helped sometimes, other times he he has regained consciousness alone on the sidewalk, in pain and disoriented. That’s what I was referring to in my previous post; the fact that people who are going about their daily lives do not notice if someone has a disability that isn’t obvious. Sometimes they don’t even see me when I’m in my wheelchair. Several people have walked into me, usually because they are talking on their cell or texting.

            People will offer help if it seems that a person is in a lot of pain or having some other problems, but then again, they might figure that it’s the EMTs job to provide medical assistance. Before I became disabled, I had no idea how difficult it is to get around, especially on a busy street, and I certainly didn’t notice if someone had disabilities that weren’t obvious. I was usually busy trying to get somewhere. I think many people do the same. It wasn’t until I needed a cane for short distances and a wheelchair for distances longer than six blocks that I became aware of the various issues involved being mobility challenged. My post wasn’t intended to infer that people with invisible disabilities do not suffer. I hope I have made that clear in this post.

    • Guest

      “do you apply the same description to White fraternity members who rape women on campus” Are you referring to the Duke rape case or the UVa rape case?

      • Angela Shortt

        Both.

        • John

          So you were not actually, after all referring to the UVa rape case – you were talking about cases in which someone is actually raped.

          • Angela Shortt

            Yes.

    • Vault101

      Can’t speak for everyone, but I don’t see the word “thug” as being owned by any one race. By its very definition it is essentially anyone who is violent and involved with criminal activity. So, yes, I have used the word thug to describe white people, black people, and if a race of tyranical insect warriors arrived from outer space, I would call them thugs as well.

    • Vault101

      Can’t speak for everyone, but I don’t see the word “thug” as being owned by any one race. By its very definition it is essentially anyone who is violent and involved with criminal activity. So, yes, I have used the word thug to describe white people, black people, and if a race of tyranical insect warriors arrived from outer space, I would call them thugs as well.

    • eric

      They’re thugs because they use force to make people listen to them.

      I don’t give a crap what you’re standing up for. If you use physical force on people, you’re a thug.

  • Jamboning

    What is wrong with these so called intelligent university students? They want a hall named after a criminal, terrorist who murdered a police officer in cold blood and tried to kill a second officer. I am ashamed and disgusted to be a black man in this country. If I could change my skin color to white and be a member of a more civilized race I would do it to escape being lumped in with today’s black ideology and stereotype behavior. My race is living up to everything others believe about us being ignorant, criminals and drug addicts. We would have been better off if Lincoln had not been assassinated and sent our ancestors back to Africa like he was planning to do. All of you blacks should be ashamed of yourselves.

  • Angela Shortt

    Tyrone, what are talking about? Please explain. You went from briefly talking about being disrespected to how your family “didn’t need all that nonsense of paper work we make benjamins”. Baby, I’m not going to assume to know the meaning of your words. Please explain with some of examples so that I can be clear about what you mean. I know it’s plain to you; I’ve heard that rebuttal numerous times over the years.But I don’t reside in your mind, so help me out with your words.

  • Nutelaqua Nigresia

    Do you allow for any diversity of opinion in this publication? Or must it all be progressive, pro-black, pro-miscegenation, pro-gay, pro-abortion, pro-entitlement, and pro-criminal Communist???

    • Darius Jamil Greene

      The mods here are very left-wing and I suspect that many sympathize with the protesters despite the violence that has been perpetrated and has largely gone unpunished.
      IMHO, it’s not “Black lives matter.” It’s just “Black voices are idle chatter.” I am ashamed of the way my own race behaves, and I am just as ashamed at the way Caucasians and Asians coddle us, It’s pretty disgusting. These protesters should stop flapping their gums and get a job.

      • Ryan Burke

        These people should be ashamed of themselves. Fighting with whites and blocking gates isn’t going to get any points from me. If you want to make things better you have to work from the inside. There are many Black Colleges producing doctors, lawyers, engineers and PHD educators. To honor a murderer like Shakur demeans all of us who went to colleges like Grambling, Bethune-Cookman, Alcorn State, Prairie View A & M and others just to name a few. We worked, we studied, we went to church, we sang in the choirs and we married good women and good men and support our children through work. These rude and violent children do nothing to honor our race, and are an embarrassment to every Black person who uses hard work and determination to get ahead.
        It is sad they honor a convicted murderer and prison escapee.

        • TheOne BillyGunn

          Well said.

        • John

          You have made a number of intelligent and mature comments in this discussion.

    • John

      They are pro-bigotry, as long as the bigotry is directed towards white people.

  • Patricia Lin

    Re question about low income students at Berkeley — 40% of UCB students are Pell Grant recipients. These are only available to students of low income — ~ $30k for a family of 4. This does not include the Undocumented students on campus, many of whom are low-income. The number of Pell grant recipients is more than at the Ivy League combined and more than many colleges.

    Because if 209, the University cannot use affirmative action in admissions.

    The fact that K-12 schools serving underrepresented minorities including African Americans are under resources compared to those serving the rest of the population and also provide a weaker education means that these students are challenged in becoming strong candidates for Berkeley. Berkeley has a department, the Center for Educational Partnerships, whose aim is increase college going especially for students in underresourced areas, and a very strong program preparing community college students from such backgrounds to be competitive candidates to transfer to Berkeley. However the challenge is a big one the university cannot solve alone

    • Neighbor

      I believe the question was the race breakdown of the low income students, do you have those data? Thanks.

      Also that seem incredible that only families (of 4) making 30k or less are eligible for Pell Grants, and that 40% of students fit those criteria! 30K or 2500./mo for a family of four is extremely low income. Where geographically are those students coming from?

      • Patricia Lin

        I do not have those at hand. By definition Pell Grants are for only those who are very low income. And this is a federal grant whose income limits are not adjusted by state. The vast vast majority of Berkeley students are CA students. There is a huge emphasis on ensuring this though Economic pressures — ie the reduction of state contribution to the Unvrrsity budget from more than 80% to less than 10% in the last 20 years — had less to allowing more out of state students — who are charged a higher fee, to be admitted

  • Dana

    Wow you leave for an hour and more vibrant diversity shows up

  • Tyrone Lewis

    We don’t have no problems like this in Chi-town

  • Gene Nelson

    You asked protesters to please read it when you are just ended up calling them morons and thugs? Yeah, you know how to get people to listen to your points. And your racism is not veiled at all — I notice you do love saying that word “thug”, don’t you? It’s just code for your stereotype of black people. Hopefully your son will become enlightened while he attends Berkeley and not grow up to be like you.

    • dirtybastard65

      He is calling them thugs because that’s what jbuns are…thugs, criminals and druggies.

    • Vault101

      Nice try, but the word thug actually has nothing to do with race and originates from a notoriously depraved band of criminals dating back some 800 years ago, known at the Thuggees. Troll harder.

    • eric

      This isn’t enlightened. This is arrogance mixed with righteous indignation.

      A thug is a violent person. A person who physically repels people trying to go about their lives and get an education is violence, whether you agree with a message or not.

      Freedom of speech is fine. Forcing your speech on people by using force is not free speech. It’s thuggish.

      I find your ignorance almost funny though, because the people saying thug is the new N word say so for people like Mike Brown who perfectly fit the definition of thug.

      Here’s a name for people like you. Idiot.

  • SlumberingPierrot

    In any _meaningful_ capacity. You know last year I had one of your members tell me I’m Asian, and thus too white-passing and too privileged to be PoC and to be involved in activism?

  • Neighbor

    Are you serious? They sent people through Strawberry Creek, which is protected, and the subject of much restoration work on campus?? On the busiest day of the year with 1000s of people pouring in? How did they ever get a permit for that? I had assumed people were simply funneled through the smaller side gates. There were many young black students and children there with their families, yes a warm welcome to them might have been smarter as well.

    • Tyrone Lewis

      I don’t see how this helps me

    • concerned Black student

      The majority of people who were able bodied used the stairs by Anthony hall. Families with young children were allowed to pass, and most of the Black families/students stood in solidarity with us. They understand what it feels like to be ignored.

  • massawhite

    The only thing we should see her name on is a warrant for her execution in the cowardly murder of one police officer and the attempted murder of another police officer. I’ll volunteer to flip the switch on Old Sparky.

  • dirtybastard65

    If UC Berkeley ever names a hall after Ass-shat Shakura, a convicted cop killer , that’s right folks, the murderer of a police officer, then they should also name a hall in all fairness to the memory of the great Nathan Bedford Forrest,a Lieutenant General in the Confederate Army during the American Civil War.He was one of the few officers in either army to enlist as a private and be promoted to General Officer and division commander during the war and co-created one of the greatest groups to benefit mankind.

  • Ryan Burke

    This recognizing a convicted murderer does not honor our race.

    • DNAC101

      Amen brotha!

  • TheOne BillyGunn

    Such as black-on-black crimes? Get your house in order first, then maybe we will starti taking Blacklivesmatter seriously.

    • Ryan Burke

      Our neighborhoods are over run by drug dealers and men who make children and then won’t work to support them.

      • TheOne BillyGunn

        You have a firm grasp of some of the issues within the black-community. It is people such as yourself that can make a difference because of the willingness to discuss these problems which movements like Blacklivesmatter do not. The rap music sends a terrible message to the youth as well. It’s a very difficult situation.

        • blackalaureate

          what about white on white crime? are you getting that part of your house in order, billy gunn?

          • Neighbor

            That wouldn’t help black people so why do you ask? The point about black on black crime is that the rates are so incredibly high, much higher than in any other community. That’s why people bring it up, so your retort makes no sense.

          • blackalaureate

            looking at “black on black crime” does nothing to stop police brutality against black people either. that’s why i brought up “white on white crime” because it is equally irrelevant in the conversation.

            high blood pressure and diabetes are also great concerns in the black community. i guess we should start talking about that in this conversation too, right? (answer is no…it’s not relevant).

          • Neighbor

            ” why are YOU asking, if it doesn’t help you?”

            the focus of the discussion is helping black people.

            “looking at “black on black crime” does nothing to stop police brutality against black people either.”

            You sound very sure of that – do you have actual evidence for this statement?

          • blackalaureate

            “You sound very sure of that – do you have actual evidence for this statement?”

            sure. just look at the comment thread. that’s my evidence.

          • Neighbor

            That is non-sensical. A comment thread on the internet is your evidence?

          • blackalaureate

            yes, a comment thread is my evidence in response to your question.

            if you think that’s nonsensical, all the better.

          • blackalaureate

            “the focus of the discussion is helping black people.”

            is it? i don’t see where it is stated that the focus is “helping” black people.

            i see that the topic of discussion regards the reasons why students formed a blockade at us berkeley. i don’t sense any paternalistic tones about “helping” black folks.

          • Neighbor

            hahahaha okay.

            THIS is why all the change has to come from within the black community. I will let black people solve the problem on their own since I don’t want to be accused of paternalism;)

          • blackalaureate

            you post presumes that you know what the problem is. “black on black crime” isn’t what is being discussed.

          • Neighbor

            You are making less and less sense. I never said that I was an authority you are pretty paranoid or something and keep twisting things around. It is a waste of time trying to communicate with some people when they have blinders on and an obvious agenda. Goodbye.

          • blackalaureate

            i didn’t invite you to have a conversation with me. you jumped on to the threads i was in like a lyme tick, and now you’re upset that you aren’t getting the responses you’d like to hear. oh well. no skin off my nose.

          • TheOne BillyGunn

            We can’t help you if it is ingrained in your culture. The violence towards men and women is evident in your rap music. It’s all about money, ho’s, and murder. Stop kidding yourself and take a good look at your people.

          • John

            Wow, man. I find your use of “your” culture, and “your” music to be illogical, non-constructive, othering, and offensive.

            Other than that, you are making good points about the relationship between culture and behavior.

          • blackalaureate

            are you speaking to me personally?

            i’m curious – how would you know *what* my culture is? i’m pretty sure we’ve never met.

          • John

            @theonebillygunn:disqus Ugg! Can you please stop saying “your culture” as @blackalaureate:disqus was a product of a single, monolithic ‘black culture’ ?

            He is not responsible for the actions of other black people. And this line of separation you draw is artificial, and not constructive.

            Edit: haha, I didn’t realize I was responding to the same comment I responded to 7 hours ago. Regardless, it still bothers me.

          • TheOne BillyGunn

            Now you’re just being stupid and trying too hard at being sarcastic. The approach taken by most of these types of movements (Dreamers, Jews/Muslims, homosexuals, blacks) is downright childish: “Accommodate us in everything or we won’t help with anything” you really aren’t trying to find middle ground. Why did I point to the black-in-black crime? Because it is a much, much, bigger problem than white-on-black crime. If black lives matter wouldn’t you work in your community to stop it? Mexican gangs called a truce between Mexican gangs and their communities are becoming much safer. Why can’t the black community do this as well? The black community is in trouble because of its’ own members and not anything else.

          • Mark Talmont

            Where was this Mexican truce? It’s a Norteno-Sureno gang war in the San Joaquin valley. Those counties keep setting new homicide records every year, the profile of a homicide case there is now one where victim and perpetrator are both Mexican teens.

          • TheOne BillyGunn

            Los Angeles. The Mexican Mafia gave the order: no drive-by shootings and no more violence against other southern gangs.

          • Angela Shortt

            That order didn’t apply to Stockton and Modesto. Chess pieces, being moved around the board. Don’t you love evil genius?

          • TheOne BillyGunn

            Northern gangs have always had a problem with taking orders from Southern leadership. And so they are doing their own thing instead of thinking about the greater good. At least that’s how it is here in the gang capital.

          • blackalaureate

            name calling only means your arguments are weak. try again without the ad-homs.

          • John

            > Because it is a much, much, bigger problem than white-on-black crime.

            If we are talking white cops killing black people, I disagree. The ‘size’ of a problem isn’t measured in just the number of fatalities, but also the context and consquences of those fatalities. Cops should not be getting away with murder.

            > If black lives matter wouldn’t you work in your community to stop it?

            Why are you assuming he doesn’t? And why treat it like a zero sum game? We should address racism, police violence, AND high crime rates in poor neighborhoods and black neighborhoods – all at the same time.

          • peepsqueek

            You are incorrect! If you live in a neighborhood that has above the national average in street crime (in this case ‘black on black crime’, the neighborhood is going to demand better protection, which means more aggressive cops coming into a neighborhood that is also dangerous for the cops as well. So there is a direct connection!

            Much of the street crime is caused by a liberal Court system, as most violent street offenders are repeat offenders and career criminals. You have to decide how many chances that people who commit unforgivable crimes are going to get?? It has a direct connection!

            If you go to the police website in your community, you can usually pull up pictures and videos of your local repeat offenders and career criminals in your community, and hope that you do not look like any of them. People are also profiled by the description of criminals by their victims.

          • blackalaureate

            the key word being IF. not all black people live in high crime areas, yet they still get mistreated by the police.

          • peepsqueek

            What is the statistical probability of a stop ending in physical abuse when you fully cooperate and show a little respect to the Officer? What is the statistical probability of a stop ending in physical abuse when you run away, struggle with the Officer, or punch a cop in his face through his police car window. Especially in broad daylight in front of multiple witnesses or a police dash-cam?

          • blackalaureate

            now you’re changing the goal posts from high crime areas to respect.

            there are black people who have been respectful and compliant, not in bad neighborhoods, who have been mistreated by cops.

            it even happened to chris rock last month on 3 occasions.

          • peepsqueek

            You changed the goal post! In a high crime areas you have an extra burden to be respectful to the police, who are already on edge and have the authority to use force. Statistically, if you put enough cops out there, there will be a few bad apples, which is even more of a reason not to rock the boat. Bad behavior is not acceptable regardless of color,

          • blackalaureate

            yawn. i’m over this topic. next.

          • peepsqueek

            I hope you finally get the positive message that I am attempting to reach you with.

          • blackalaureate

            yawn.

          • peepsqueek

            If you were truly bored, you would not read and respond to my every post. My grandchildren sometimes acted bored when I’d tell them why they should only eat healthful foods and to brush their teeth everyday. I used to make them workout with me for an hour if they wanted me to buy them an ice cream. Now they are big, disciplined, well formed, and very good athletes. There is a price to be paid for everything good, and we had a lot of laughs along the way.

          • blackalaureate

            yawn, again.

          • peepsqueek

            Thank you for reading all my posts!

          • blackalaureate

            i don’t know the statistical probabilities, and i don’t think those details are even important in the macro sense of this. as i said before, there are black people who have been brutalized who aren’t in bad areas, who have done no harm, who DON’T run away, etc etc etc.

            in police manuals (and yes i have read a few) and in state codes, nowhere does it say that a person must be killed or beaten for being a jerk or failing to “cooperate.” cops know what they sign up for when they go into that profession. it’s their job to deal with different personalities and situations. it’s not a civilian’s paid job to behave as a cop expects. people throw fits at the DMV for crying out loud. it happens. it’s a public servant’s job to handle it accordingly and humanely, hopefully without ending a person’s life.

          • peepsqueek

            Like I said, there are tens of thousands of stops every day of the week across this Country without incident. No one says that a cop has a right to be killed or beaten for being a jerk, however, of the hundreds of thousands of police out on the street at anyone time, there is a statistical probability of a few cops being over stressed or a little unstable at a give moment, so do yourself a favor and don’t rely on every cop to be fully restrained if you are a jerk.

          • blackalaureate

            it’s implied now in american popular culture that it is ok for a cop to kill or beat someone who is misbehaving, rather than using the law as a standard for enforcement of public safety. it’s more about compliance cuz i said so, and less about protecting and serving.

          • peepsqueek

            I repeat- Cops make tens of thousands of stops across this country every day without incident, while drunk drivers kill approximately 10,000 people a year, and it does not even come up in the political debates. I would love to see drunk drivers taken out and abused, regardless of color. The police stop all kinds of people every day without beating or killing anyone. Attempt to walk a mile in their shoes or skin.

          • blackalaureate

            repeat it as much as you like. what i said still stands.

          • Mark Talmont

            Beg to differ, basic nutritional practices, especially with kids, are critical to behavior. You need be with a classroom full of 2nd graders after they get their hands on a bag of Hot Cheetos at recess.

            The MDs who are presenting their programs on PBS these days are worth listening to. Joel Fuhrman, Mark Hyman, the Amen duo especially. The Amens have got it down to the neurochemistry and Dr. Mark Hyman clarifies what crappy food does to your immunity (which is directly related to brain and behavior too). BTW Hyman is now Bill Clinton’s personal physician.

          • blackalaureate

            your response is irrelevant in this discussion. want to try again?

          • blackalaureate

            you seem to be arguing (as some non-back people so in discussions like these) that it is the responsibility of the black race to DO SOMETHING about “black on black crime.”

            is that your stance regarding the entire black race?

          • Neighbor

            No, I think individual black people in those communities are in the least good position to solve the problem, however community organizers, social justice warriors and similar could face the problem head on with more honesty, same with the lack of focus on education in many black communities. Who else can help without it being seen as white interference? All other suggested solutions are vague and impractical like “change the entire society” “end racism”. It is terrible that so few black students are admitted to Berkeley. But the only way to make it is to work really hard really consistently from K-12. BEFORE college. I just don’t see how the university is responsible for the situation. But I am open to your ideas but please be specific and let us discuss practical solutions. And lets not continue to deny that many in the black community see talking kids to the zoo or on a hike is seen as a “white thing” and disparaged. Same with academics…we all have to work together on this.

          • blackalaureate

            oh so are you saying it’s the job of “social justice warriors” to solve the problem of “black on black crime?”

            is that your position?

          • Neighbor

            oh so are you saying it’s the job of “social justice warriors” to solve the problem of “black on black crime?”

            is that your position?

            Note how this social justice warrior distorts my words every time.

            What I actually said and stand by:

            however community organizers, social justice warriors and similar could
            face the problem head on with more honesty, same with the lack of focus
            on education in many black communities.

          • Neighbor

            And btw many black activists admit these particular dysfunctions of their communities but refuse to discuss them openly among white people, understandably but counter productively because white people then perceive that they are being blamed 100% and again understandably feel that isn’t fair.

            And another result is that many, especially those without direct experience begin to believe that black people in the US are afraid to leave their homes, primarily because they might be gunned down by the hordes of racist white cops who are running around executing people for being black. When yes black males especially are at higher risk of being gunned down; however, the vast majority of incidents involve other black males, not LEOs. All the other victims of police corruption and violence are thrown under the bus as unimportant.

            And before someone starts “educating” me about police brutality – I am very anti-police state and corruption. We have to fight the corruption directly to solve the problem and support good cops who are FORCED to follow the code. There is so much to dissect and discuss (like the entire drug war) that it is frustrating to see the focus insistently directed only at racism and specifically individual racist white cops or corruption in one small town.

          • Mark Talmont

            Computerizing first grade is the place to start. Not entirely, but “logging on” to start the day and delivering a great deal of the basic literacy and numeracy basics through the digital interface does work. See, if you don’t get their attention in the first place you’re toast. The DI gets their attention. Use it. And I wouldn’t wait around, because China, India and most of the rest of the world sure isn’t.

          • TheOne BillyGunn

            Well, then who exactly is supposed to do something about this huge problem within the black community?

          • blackalaureate

            who is going to do something about the huge problem of white on white crime in the white community?

          • TheOne BillyGunn

            That’s the thing, there is no huge problem.

          • blackalaureate

            says you, sure.

          • TheOne BillyGunn

            I believe we all have a problem with murders one way or another. What I find problematic is that it has now been turned into a racial issue. It’s not. I believe it’s about police brutality. The police don’t just kill black people. And many times those persons made some mistake like running or resisting arrest on top of having a criminal record. I’m not going to worry about an ex-con meeting his end this way. They’re criminals. Blacklivesmatter tends to wilfully ignore criminal pasts or criminal behavior regarding these deaths and that’s wrong.

          • Neighbor

            This is a dangerous view – we have courts, juries and judges for a reason. No cop should be able to play executioner and some do. I agree that it affects everyone though, and that a charge a racism if a cop is white is not always applicable. And yes, part of the problem is we seem to be a violent society.

          • TheOne BillyGunn

            I’m not in favor of police officers executing anyone anymore than you are. I wouldn’t run from the police for the simple fact that it usually does not end well. He has a gun and a badge which will let him get away with murdering me. I’m not giving him one reason to shoot. Police officers are people too. They want to go home safely. Like my father always says: “It’s better that they cry at his house rather than mine.”

          • blackalaureate

            you speak of other people turning something into a racial issue while talking about “black on black crime.” when you label crime as being “black,” guess what….? YOU just turned it into a “racial issue.” LOL.

          • peepsqueek

            The question becomes: Who are whites [blaming] for white on white crime? Where does individual responsibility come in?

          • blackalaureate

            the real question is – why do we not see “white on white crime” as “white on white crime” even though it exists?

          • John

            Because violent white on white crime doesn’t – as often – have a massive and systemic detrimental effect on white communities…. at least not in recent decades in the US.

            When it does, it is usually a lone mass murderer, which is harder for us to see and accept as possibly a cultural issue. (And I don’t mean ‘white culture’ vs ‘black culture’, but more ‘the culture of the local community’)

          • blackalaureate

            john – white on white crime has had a detrimental effect on the white community. we just don’t see it in media. it exists, to be sure. all those pedophiles, school shooters, wife beaters and college rapists aren’t imaginary.

          • John

            Are you aware of the way you’ve tried to shift the baseline for comparison?

            Violent “black on back” crime in the USA is very much unlike ‘white on white’ crime, in its violence and its degree of impact on the community. People who care about the black community should care about black on black crime. (And people like BillyGunn should stop harping on it, as if it gives us all an excuse to ignore the problems of racism today. )

            Mass shooters I’ll give you; I also address why they aren’t viewed as ‘white on white’ crime.

          • blackalaureate

            violent crime is violent crime, no matter who perpetrates it.

            it’s no better or worse depending on the skin color. sorry pal.

          • John

            Why do you insist on misrepresenting what others say?

          • blackalaureate

            same reason why i haven’t “stopped beating my wife.”

            presuppositions in the form of questions that are placed on me are always fun.

          • John

            And the worst wife beater is one who is in denial of doing it, right after doing it plain as day for all to see.

          • blackalaureate

            right, and the assumption that a bad thing has already happened and a question on top of the assumption leaves the assumption to be unquestioned…a common fallacy in argumentation.

          • John

            Here and elsewhere you suffer from a lack of intellectual integrity. This is common among people who are deeply dedicated to an ideological position.

          • blackalaureate

            uh huh, sure. anyway, as i said before, the assumption that one thing is true (that one beats their wife) when it isn’t necessarily true puts the new question (asking one if they’ve stopped the beating) into ontological peril.

          • blackalaureate

            “People keep saying, ‘We need to have a conversation about race,’” she explains. “This is the conversation. I want to see a cop shoot a white unarmed teenager in the back,” Morrison says. “And I want to see a white man convicted for raping a black woman. Then when you ask me, ‘Is it over?’, I will say yes.”

            —-toni morrison

          • TheOne BillyGunn

            My issue is with Blacklivesmatter and what I believe they truly stand for: violent confrontation. And forgive my use of “your music” or just “your” period. I am responding on my phone and wrote it out that way for brevity’s sake.

            Southern-whites also live in a culture of violence although limited primarily to the South. The murder rate is high among whites in the South. Much of it to do with that Southern honor thing. Obviously this is not simply a black problem.

          • John

            BillyGunn, I’m surprised by you. You say some things that sound very ignorant or even racist, but you also seem to really be thinking and willing to learn – unlike some of the ‘anti racists’ in these comments who just regurgitate dogma.

            Who is the ‘they’ that you refer to here? I believe that Black Lives Matter; I believe that police brutality and targeting of black people is a problem in the US; I am an advocate for greater consequences for abusive, racist police officers.

            And I strongly disapprove of the tactics (in this context) of these protestors. I know many people who feel the same way as I – that both (a) Black Lives Matter! and (b) some activist are so full of themselves and their self righteous ideology that they get out of hand.

            So who are you talking about when you say “they” ?

            Maybe your habit of thinking of the ‘black lives matter’ activists as a single group of people isn’t helpful. Maybe its only _some_ of the ‘black lives matter’ activists that stand for violent confrontation – maybe other ‘black lives matter’ activists are coming from a place of greater maturity and empathy.

          • TheOne BillyGunn

            I hope a more charitable interpretation would be afforded to my views regarding Black Lives Matter. I do not think if them as a single group of people. Of course I believe all black lives matter, what kind of human being would disregard senseless murder regardless of race? I think it has gotten through to other posters as to who I’m referring to when I use the term ‘they’. I think you do as well. And it’s not a derogatory term, at least not how I’m using it. I know it may read that way if you were not trying to meet me halfway on this. I’m not trying to make a blanket statement regarding the black community. First of all because it would be false. Too easily disproven. Secondly because I don’t believe this to be the case. But many of these protests turn confrontational and seem bent on retribution and the movement suffers for it. If we’re not going to discuss this as gentlemen then there is no point in having the conversation.

            Not that it matters but I’ve been physically assaulted by the police on several occasions, unfortunately. I don’t know what you believe you think you know about who I am but I actually was raised in the inner-city. I know what they do to people and get away with all too well. I don’t run from them because that will only end up badly. I don’t excuse it but it is a fact of life. I’m not trying to have the last or definitive word. I’m just trying to have a frank an honest conversation.

          • John

            Just to be clear, I did not think that you were referring to ‘all black people’ as ‘they’, but I did think you were referring to ‘all BLM supporters’ as ‘they’; and wanted to be sure you were not, because there are people like me who support Black Lives Matter in general, but not necessarily aggressive actions like this one at Berkeley.

            > But many of these protests turn confrontational and seem bent on retribution and the movement suffers for it.

            I absolutely agree. Its the same problem we see with every group of people with a cause (anti-abortion, feminist, anti-feminist, pro and anti gun control, pro and anti animal rights, etc) – some percentage of the activists are just crappy people who get carried away with self righteousness.

            > Not that it matters but I’ve been physically assaulted by the police on several occasions, unfortunately.

            I know, right?!! In some places, this actually happens to everyone unless you look like you have a lawyer on your speed dial. And I am dismayed to see so many of the B.L.M. protesters these past few months trying to paint a picture as if ONLY certain people suffer at the hands of police. Which isn’t to say that racially motivated police brutality isn’t its own problem, which we should also address.

          • TheOne BillyGunn

            Police brutality, whether motivated by race or other factors, is a serious problem. I remember many a time in which the brutalizing officer would let me know ahead of time he was going to put a hurting on me. He would say: “If I have to get out of this car you’re going to remember it.” Many clique’s of officers tend to operate in such fashion regardless of whether you’ve actually committed a crime. They conduct themselves above the law because they are the law. It’s admittedly a cynical view, but it holds a lot of realism. Those in power tend to abuse their power. This goes for the President on down to the local police officer and most offices in between. Why? The Human-factor. Power corrupts and absolute power corrupts absolutely. I forget where I got that quote, I may have it slightly off so I didn’t actually quote it.

            We try to be morally upright creatures but fail miserably quite often. And people in power are no different. I may have strayed a bit from the point but I do believe we suffer by dreaming of and then trying to create a perfect world–a utopia. Let’s just make it the best place possible for everyone and not just for those of a certain color or creed. If the movement were called All Lives Matter, they would have themselves an ardent supporter in myself.

          • peepsqueek

            I assume it is because of the amount of black on black street crime is what causes the authorities to send in more aggressive constables on patrol (cops), ending many times in the media. Why does the media never report the amount of black on white street crime, which is significantly higher, according to FBI statistics?? For what ever its worth–

            As of Jan 31, 2012 FBI SPECIAL AGENTS:

            Am. Indian/Alaska Native – 55 agents

            Asian – 576

            Black/African American – 652 agents

            Hispanic/Latino – 983 agents

            Hawaiian/Pac. Islander – 13 agents

            Multi-Racial – 56 agents

          • blackalaureate

            correlation, not causation. white on white crime is just as prevalent as black on black crime which is just as prevalent as _____on ____crime. “black on black” is scarier, sexier, and gets more neilsen points and internet clicks. “black on black” give cops jobs to do. “black on black” maintains the status quo in other areas of society.

            “white on white crime” as a boogeyman and a battering ram against public sensibilities isn’t effective, since white folk are in the majority anyway. it’s much easier to afraid of THE OTHER, even though essentially, all people behave the same way.

        • concerned Black student

          Rap music is sold by white male owners of record labels.

          Black people do not pull the metal from the earth to make guns, nor are there gun shops in urban Black communities (how do they get there?)

          Black folks do not grow the plants necessary to produce high impact drugs in the United States. It has to be flown over here, and we don’t have that type of money.

          Schools in urban areas lack resources and qualified teachers because of property taxes, and deindustrialization is responsible for bringing down property taxes and taking away jobs.

          Black folks who commit drug crimes are often forced to, with rampant job discrimination. A white drop out person with a felony is more likely to get a job than a Black high school graduate with no criminal record.

          So please, explain to me how “black on black crime” is our fault again?

          • peepsqueek

            Good points! But you are making excuses for bad behavior. Race can be used as an excuse on any side of the coin. Math is purely objective. The vast majority of the poor in this Country, regardless of race, fall into three categories: did not finish high school; started a family before they were adults; and are making babies without the benefit of a committed partner. And their children are not getting a head start in life. The Government or the System cannot force you to stay in school and to have good relationships. People of all colors make bad choices in life. Blame is the egos way of not having to take any responsibility.

            It is like living in a County that eats too much, drinks too much, and smokes too much, and then they complain that we have an over crowded healthcare system. If junk food, tobacco, and alcohol is a problem, then put them out of business by not buying their products. That is real power! Consuming those products take away your power. Just making a point.

          • TheOne BillyGunn

            Yes, black folks don’t own the means for distribution, but without the Black-artist there is no record to speak of. So the Artist should take responsibility for his art. But in many cases his art inspires many to crime and violence. Should he not also share in the blame?

            It’s no secret that the CIA flooded the inner-cities with drugs primarily targeting black communities. I have no doubt the weapons come from the same source. But you still have to play the game in order to lose. So why give in to murder and drug use? Many others in your community, yourself included, have risen above it to lead fulfilling lives. You are responsible for your success and also for your failures. Same goes for the criminal.

            Other minority communities also experience funding issues and somehow produce intellectuals. Same as in your community except for the high rate of black on black crime.

            Poor folks tend to live in the grey, no doubt. And sometimes you get caught up making easy money. Unfortunately, two wrongs still don’t make a right. It just doesn’t. You don’t need to engage in criminal activities when public assistance is readily available.

            So how isn’t black-on-black crime not your fault again?

          • TheOne BillyGunn

            Yes, black folks don’t own the means for distribution, but without the Black-artist there is no record to speak of. So the Artist should take responsibility for his art. But in many cases his art inspires many to crime and violence. Should he not also share in the blame?
            It’s no secret that the CIA flooded the inner-cities with drugs primarily targeting black communities. I have no doubt the weapons come from the same source. But you still have to play the game in order to lose. So why give in to murder and drug use? Many others in your community, yourself included, have risen above it to lead fulfilling lives. You are responsible for your success and also for your failures. Same goes for the criminal.
            Other minority communities also experience funding issues and somehow produce intellectuals. Same as in your community except for the high rate of black on black crime.
            Poor folks tend to live in the grey, no doubt. And sometimes you get caught up making easy money. Unfortunately, two wrongs still don’t make a right. It just doesn’t. You don’t need to engage in criminal activities when public assistance is readily available.
            So how isn’t black-on-black crime not your fault again?

      • CheckYourIgnorance

        Several studies confirm that the absentee black father “trend” became popularized with the increased criminalization of black people when Reagan introduced the War on Drugs. Lots of black people like the “get tough on crime” bit even though crime was actually on the decline. It’s these trends that don’t show up in the media. Don’t fall for the okie doke. Yes, there are murders. But Black on Black crime happens at almost the same rate as white on white crime. According to the FBI’s most recent crime stats, White-on-White crime is way up. But you don’t hear about that. In your spare time, read the New Jim Crow by Michelle Alexander. There are lots of ways that black people are conditioned along with everyone else into thinking society just got like this. Segregation is still very much alive and well.

        • Mark Talmont

          The crime statistics reported by the feds are unreliable due to the way they account for “Hispanics”. For instance, there is a separate category for Hispanic victims of “bias crimes”, but in the event they commit such a crime…they turn white. In general they constantly shade the numbers to make the white population look bigger than it really is. Non-Hispanic whites are 25% of the school-aged population in California now–would you know this from the way the mass media portrays the state? Meanwhile the politicos wail about “resegregation” of the schools, apparently never stopping to consider how you can “integrate” a majority into a minority. Maybe like King Solomon suggested is what they have in mind?

          • CheckYourIgnorance

            You are correct on the racioethnic categorization. I, myself have qualms with this. Resegregation is happening to an extent. I, however, challenge whether integration happened, or was ever achieved I should say. Particularly in rural areas and particularly throughout the South, segregation academies (private school actually founded on the premise of opposing integration) continue to divide races and educational resources. And I’m not sure what your sources are, but do they only measure public school stats? If so then that makes a lot of since as private school and charter schools attract a significantly higher proportion of non-Hispanic White students. These aren’t captured in a significant portion of data plots.

          • CheckYourIgnorance

            I actually did find your source. Yeah, that’s the public school system. White students (those who can afford) are being siphoned off into the private segregation academies. If you account for those, then things add up. It took me a while to. I was studying the school demographics in a particular town and I just though White people just stopped having kids or something. But nope, the answer is inequality.

        • Mark Talmont

          I think you can watch Alexander present her material off the CSpan 2 BookTV site, or probably on YouTube. But like the rest of the “civil rights establishment” I think she’s missing the boat when it comes to the behavioral programming that starts younger than ever now. For instance I have encountered overt sexual references coming from 7-year-olds. Stir this in with constant n-word, b-word, h-word, a chest-thumping show-off culture and you’ve got Trouble before you even know it.

        • John

          > But Black on Black crime happens at almost the same rate as white on white crime

          False, unless by ‘almost’ you mean 10-15% difference.

          • CheckYourIgnorance

            I know of the statistic. It has also been addressed in research surrounding the trend. Crimes committed to not correlate to crimes reported. But let’s say the statistic is completely true. white families holding (currently) on average 8X the wealth of Black families is a direct consequence of those 200+ years of slavery followed by the ~30 years of Black Codes and ~70 years of Jim Crow. We’re still seeing the residue of explicit oppression. And we’re now entered an age of implicit bias. (The racism that only shows up in system analysis and habituation testing)

          • John

            > I know of the statistic

            So stop lying. If your view is valid, you wouldn’t need to lie to justify it.

          • eric

            Well you’re talking about crime. Black on Black murder is the real problem.

            Just around the same number as White on White murder, except blacks are 1/6th the population of whites.

          • CheckYourIgnorance

            I wouldn’t say that Black on Black murder is the “real crime”. I would argue that implicit biases as a result of inequality is the real crime. I won’t contest that Black people are convicted of more murders than white people. Those murders are about 90% interracial (so White fear of Blacks isn’t completely rational). Cases involving Black suspects are more likely to be solved. That has been proven. Systemic oppression has a greatest impact on Black communities. That has been proven. But I do invite you to scrutinize the conclusion to this data. In understanding this data, psychologists are finding more and more evidence that these trends are results and residual effects of societal racism. A problem caused by White dominated society. My sources: Google Scholars-> Jennifer Eberhardt. From these empirical studies you can follow bibliographies and citations to more studies (mostly psychological and public policy related, with a particular focus on implicit biases and the impact on policing and crime).

          • eric

            A couple years ago I went to a Wendys with my brothers while we were visiting Ohio. I went to the bathroom and passed a guy. A black guy. There was no confrontation, no eye contact. I did nothing but take a piss in a private room.

            When I came out, this man was talking loudly and angrily. I sat down to enjoy my cheeseburger. He then comes over and starts yelling at me and my brothers as racist farmboys, telling them “this is the city, we shoot bullets here.”

            Now this was ironic because both my brothers are in interracial relationships, we’re from Florida, not the rural part, are all college educated, and own lots of guns. This isn’t the point.

            We were more than capable of removing him, but we sat and eventually the employees convinced him to leave without violence.

            At this point you can throw this anecdote out or reflect on it.

            Yes the man probably had mental issues and so on, but think about the factors that led him to all he did.

            Do you think our bias, or the perception of a bias, was the real cause of conflict.

          • CheckYourIgnorance

            I do. If the man had mental issues, then why wouldn’t they have been addressed earlier? Or why weren’t they addressed in the moment? Would you have tried to determine what was going on if it were a white person? Why is it do you not recall what he was saying other than the part about being in the city and shooting bullets? We will never know for sure. But empirical studies do show that people (regardless of race) are more likely to think that Black people are experiencing less pain even in situations in which white people are made subject to the same stimulant. Also, Black people receive less attention in passive conditions, however when anything bad is suspected, more attention is given to them. That is to say, Black people matter more when something bad is anticipated/suspected. Even you mentioning that you own lots of guns is different if a Black male were to say it. The Black-crime heuristic is one of the strongest biases we hold as individuals. If you want to know what particular studies I’m referring to, please by all means ask.

          • eric

            First off, no one knew he had mental issues. Still don’t. It was an assumption based on how unreasonable aggressive he was. Do you walk up to random people and inspect them for mental illness? Get real.

            ” Would you have tried to determine what was going on if it were a white person?”

            What? He was randomly threatening my family and I. You even have to ask if it would have mattered if he was white? It was a stranger, I repeat, threatening my family for no reason. Should I have sat him down and asked about how he felt about his mother?

            “Why is it do you not recall what he was saying other than the part about being in the city and shooting bullets?”

            Because it was a year ago, he was threatening my family, and in retrospect was comedically ironic. About the only thing he said that really stood out for obvious reasons.

            And as for your studies, you can provide me the individual ones you want, but the problem is regardless of if there is a bias, does that bias cause blacks to do horrible things, or do the horrible things create a bias?

            I live in a black neighborhood and I understand perfectly well why shit happens. You can call it systemic oppression all you want, but the fact is people aren’t raising their kids right, and that’s not something that goes with the package of poverty.

          • CheckYourIgnorance

            Did you look at the studies? Living in a predominately Black neighborhood does not change the proven facts. Again, I will point you towards the studies I refer to, but you have to still be willing to acknowledge this for what it is. Truth. It’s not as simple as “people aren’t raising their kids right”. It goes a lot deeper than that.

          • eric

            I already asked you to provide me the studies. All you gave me was the name of one lady.

            However I’m slightly weary that you don’t know how analyze studies since you’re using calling their conclusions proven facts. It takes more than a couple studies to make a proven fact. There are observations that people can make educated conclusions off of, but things like whether a bias is a result or cause of behavior is a lot more complicated than a few simple behavioral studies.

          • eric

            I already asked for the studies and you gave me light years from a decent citation. You gave me a name of one lady. You’re going to have to be more specific about what studies you’re talking about.

            Furthermore, I’m weary of your ability to properly analyze any of these studies anyways because you’re using the words “proven facts” to describe your conclusions of some behavioral studies. That’s not how it works.

            Again, even if you prove that a bias exists, that’s not the end of the story. The existence of a bias alone does not explain everything you’re trying to write off as the effects of oppression. You could easily argue the bias is a result of the facts you’re blaming on the bias.

          • CheckYourIgnorance

            Results of the Simons & Chabis clip (1999). Eberhardt, Godd, Purdie, & Davies (2004). Correll, Park, Judd, & Wittenbrink (2002). David Baldis et. Al. (regarding death sentencing). Eberhardt, Davies, Purdie-Vaugn, & Johnson. Hetey & Eberhardt (2004/2014). Trawler, Hoffman, & Waytz (2012). There are other federal documents cited, but I think they’re in the works cited sections of these research pieces. Google Scholar should assist.

          • CheckYourIgnorance

            I wouldn’t call Dr. Eberhardt “one lady”. She has been awarded the McArthur Genius Grant for her work and is the leading scholar in how implicit racial bias impacts perception and its relationship to the criminal justice system.

    • John

      Are you seriously saying that everyone in the black community should become a model citizen before mainstream society should start concerning itself with legitimate cases of police abusing their powers?

      • TheOne BillyGunn

        I think you know that that would be a ridiculous demand to make and I’m upset that I actually have to dignify your comment with a response.

        • John

          You say that someone else should get their own house in order FIRST, before ‘we’ will start taking BLM seriously.

          To me, this strongly implies that the problem of black-on-black is a reason to not take BLM seriously.

          What are you really saying with the ‘house in order first’ comment, if not ‘the black community’s failure to address black crime is a reason to not take BLM seriously’ ?

          • TheOne BillyGunn

            I’m sorry. What I meant by getting their house in order was addressing the crisis of violence within the black community affecting way too many lives. Not to simply protest racially-polarizing murders. It sends a message, at least to me, that somehow those murders are not worthy of the same anger and civil unrest. It’s a childish approach and that is what I cannot take seriously. Just like many other types of protester’s, the self-righteous type you mention in another post. I hope this helps.

  • TheOne BillyGunn

    I guess black lives matter when a white-person is the killer. No problem if it’s black-on-black murder, right? This entire movement is retarded.

    • Dana

      In Milwaukee this week 9 individuals resembling your description were dotted this week

    • blackalaureate

      and for you i guess black lives matter when they are 6 feet under, right?

      • TheOne BillyGunn

        No, that’s just you projecting your feelings on to me. If black lives really do matter to you why not address the problems within the black community? Make a better life for every black life if every black life really matters to you. Making this into a race issue will lead to nothing.

        • blackalaureate

          ” If black lives really do matter to you why not address the problems within the black community? ”

          easy.

          both-and, not either-or.

          it’s completely possible for people to talk about multiple things all at once, and this is something i do quite frequently in different circles.

          your real question is – why don’t black people talk to YOU, a white dude, about these issues.

  • Spheres deAzure

    Why are these black students at UC always so grotesque? Could they be chomping on greasy KFC 24/7?
    They always have big guts and when you walk downwind of them, the sheboons smell of 7-day old sun-baked cod fish. Back in the Army, we used to call it sun-baked bacala. You think they’d wash that stanky puntang!!

  • Marius Quentical

    I think it’s time to boycott UC Berkeley and UCLA…..especially with this force-fed diversity course that will be a prerequisite to graduation. We already know about the violent, unpredicable, chimp-like behavor of these black students. Why do we now need a 3-credit semester-long course to teach us about the violence and animalism coded for in their DNA?

  • Nutelaqua Nigresia

    I’ll bet that 99% of the complainers at Berkeley were apefirmative action black students. A few bonobos here, a few silverbacks there….with large gaping maws out of which nwordbabble spews. Just disgusting.

  • Darius Jamil Greene

    Why do we tolerate such black racism? It really is high time these protesters go back to Africa. I’d pay for a few one-way tickets myself.

  • Rosa Hernandez

    If only the commentors bellow were equally upset about the murder with impunity of young Black people by cops as they are about naming a building after Assata. Also good to know she still scares the crap out of conservative white people.

    • Neighbor

      Yeah you said that already.

      • blackalaureate

        it bears repeating.

    • TheOne BillyGunn

      Do you suffer from an inferiority-complex? White-people?

    • John

      If only people like you with so much passion to make the world a better place would actually think things through more, and stop making ridiculous and false assumptions about the values of the people who disagree with you.

  • JennaTelya

    The boat is leaving the dock and heading to Africa , all J-Buns need to be on it.

  • CoD

    Interesting that the author fails to mention that Assata Shakur is not merely an “activist” but a convicted cop killer and a fugitive from justice who has been harbored by Cuba since 1984. Her extradition should be a precondition for removal of Cuba from the state sponsor of terrorism list.

    • kr

      Can you give us more details about the case please? It wasn’t as simple as “a convicted cop killer”.

      • Dana

        Go to wikipedia if you are capable of finding it

        • Ryan Burke

          I know about this woman she is a criminal who murdered a white policeman

      • CoD

        Well black racists claim she was innocent but that’s ridiculous (they also claim Mumia Abu-Jamal is innocent which is equally ridiculous). Also her group and her engaged in a string of crimes including bank robberies. She should be extradited to serve out her days in Supermax, not be honored!

  • s randall

    It’s one thing to block Sather Gate for students and other regulars, but it’s another to block Sather Gate for guests. I suppose they get the most leverage during an event like Cal Day though. Everyone wants to put Berkeley’s best foot forward. That’s certainly the time to stick it to them.

    FWIW, was there participation from other minority groups?

    • SlumberingPierrot

      Nope, BSU never lets other minority groups participate in any meaningful capacity because they dont’ see beyond color.

    • Rosa Hernandez

      Yes, i am a Latina and I participated in solidarity, so did several Asian and white students as well. Slumbering idiot…sorry pierrot was not only not there but doesn’t bother to actually talk to any black students at Cal before spewing his ignorance.

  • Alex

    Anybody on campus who praises Assata Shakur SHOULD BE GONE. And possibly investigated by the FBI.

    • Rosa Hernandez

      Lol good to know Assata still scares the pants off conservatives

      • cop killers should scare everybody.

        • blackalaureate

          what about cops who kill people?

        • Dana

          Scary woman she sure knows how to dot the “I”

  • Dana

    Civilized society has grown weary of having to deal with tending these protesters on a daily basis. – After decades of increasing crime and violence caused by this brand of vibrant diversity, it’s quite obvious that something is wrong here.

  • John

    This is stupid. You can have a protest without physically blocking people from using a sidewalk to get somewhere. This is a blatantly hostile and aggressive action.

    • Rosa Hernandez

      Lol you don’t understand the concept of protest.

      • Dana

        I guess being rude and yelling F-Bombs is more effective ?

        • blackalaureate

          protest doesn’t have to be prim and polite.

      • Gene Nelson

        You like to tell people they don’t understand. What you never do is explain — you just insult.

      • John

        It sounds like you think that the worlds greatest protest leaders also failed to understand the concept of a protest.

  • Mike B

    Whoever admires a terrorist, he’s a terrorist by himself: “the demands include proposals to hire two full-time black admissions staff members and to rename Barrows Hall to honor Assata Shakur, an activist who has been dubbed a terrorist by the FBI.”

    • Dana

      After murdering 2 police officers, Shakur was incarcerated in several prisons in the 1970s. She escaped from prison in 1979 and fled to Cuba in 1984 after living as a fugitive for a few years, and received political asylum. She has been living in Cuba ever since. Since May 2, 2005, the FBI has classified her as a domestic terrorist and offered a $1 million reward for assistance in her capture. On May 2, 2013, the FBI added her to the Most Wanted Terrorist List; the first woman to be listed

    • Rosa Hernandez

      You really think the US has never sponsored and admired terrorism?

      • Mike B

        Please provide us with an educational example. This request is no different than requesting that Barrows Hall would be changed to Osama bin Laden Hall.

        • Dana

          Well Shakur escaped from a life sentence in Jersey and was spirited out of the US to Cuba in 1984. In 1987, she published Assata: which was written in Cuba.The book was published by Lawrence Hill & Company in the United States and Canada but the copyright is held by Zed Books Ltd. of London due to “Son of Sam” laws, which restrict who can receive profits from a book. A convicted escaped murderer being honored—unreal

  • garyfouse

    Ridiculous. Just how are black students being made to feel inconvenienced at Berkeley?

    • Dana

      They have to study, read and behave— it’s not in their genetic make up to do these things

      • CheckYourIgnorance

        That. Is definitely racist eugenics. It should have died about 60 years ago. But the human genome project DEFINITELY should’ve put an end to it. Let me guess…you’re not college educated? Or maybe you’re just a skinhead. A descendant of Jim Crow himself? Oh the possibilities. Luckily, your kind have been dying off.

      • garyfouse

        No, Dana. I don’t go along with that. I don’t like what those students did, but let’s don’t generalize.

    • Rosa Hernandez

      Try racial profiling, police surveillance, racial micro and not so micro aggressions from professors and students, a general lack of disregard for your wellbeing as a student by the administration .. the list goes on.

      • Neighbor

        “Try racial profiling, police surveillance” of students on campus?
        “a general lack of disregard for your wellbeing as a student by the administration” as compared to other students? In what way?
        “this university fails to recruit and retain Black students. It’s downright embarrassing.”
        It is embarrassing but the problem is deeper, not enough students qualify. Why not? Many struggle even when they make it. I’ve worked in schools in Oakland, and I’ve seen immigrant Asian students advance simply because their families were more education oriented. Most black students were well-dressed and parents seemed to have middle class jobs but in 3-4 grade most had never been to the Oakland zoo or on a nature walk. It was very frustrating, can’t blame it all on racism. Although I suspect you will anyway.
        “Bet you also didn’t know only 2% of the student body iS black”
        poor white students are also underrepresented. And Hispanic…Asian students are over-represented. Do you think students should reflect the society as a whole? The country? State of CA?

        • WDM

          to Neighbor and garyfouse:

          A history of oppression that has produced a system which is predisposed to disadvantage black communities should recognize these failings. Failings such as the disparities, which are clearly visible, in educational funding for schools in lower socioeconomic regions as apposed to regions of higher socioeconomic income, which are statistically more often middle class and white. A school which reaches out to students of color must understand that the students are coming from a background of education which is drastically different than that which their more privileged peers received. A 3.2 GPA in the Bronx means something very different from a 4.2 achieved in Marin County, CA, and many would say the Bronx GPA is more impressive, because of the context from which it arrises. Comparing the achievements of students of color, who are members of a disadvantaged group to counterparts of privilege, is like comparing cancer to the flu. They can both be fatal, they are both serious, but there is a SIGNIFICANT difference between the two that makes their comparison absolutely ignorant.

          Neighbor: “Poor white students are also underrepresented” This may be the case but don’t bring up yams when we’re talking about asparagus. The issue is that students of color are drastically underrepresented and by no means of their own choice. They are ill afforded the opportunity to attend universities that weigh markers of standardized achievement above the capability of the student. All students are capable. All students can succeed. Black students can and will succeed, this protest is evidence to that, but who will ultimately test better: The student who can afford private tutors, whose school had more funding and so classes were not as impacted, who faced less social anxiety and discrimination, or the student who is just as capable and on the opposite end of the spectrum, and at the very least, discriminated against by virtue of the fact that they are a person of color.

          How dare you. How dare you presume parents in Oakland do not place emphasis on their child’s education, if anything they know better than most what an education can do, but their environment is to drastically different from the college poster boy’s that for you to compare their child’s success to a child’s who is not environmentally stable is to speak from the mouth of privilege.

          I am black. I am a first generation college student. I attend UC Berkeley, and many of those protesters are people I am proud to call friends and activists for change. I am proud to be a student of color, but being a student of color has made the disparity surrounding people of color, especially black people, to those of privilege all the more obvious.

          You don’t have to be defensive. Just take a breath, look at yourself, look at this system and attack not one another or yourself or anyone else, but ask how we can recreate something beneficial, for ALL people, from something putrid and burning, because ultimately a system which does not target anyone is a system which supports everyone.

          • garyfouse

            WDM

            Very well stated. Would you not agree that the problem lies within education before the student arrives in college? Schools in poorer inner city neighborhoods are trying to deal with issues that the kids bring with them to school. Broken families, drugs, gangs, and violence. It is very hard for learning to take place in that kind of environment. I don’t disagree that students coming from disadvantaged backgrounds face added challenges in college, but I don’t see where schools like UCB or others are hostile or discriminating. As much as I am a critic of universities in general and UCB in particular, I think they are bending over backwards to be accommodating.

            At the risk of getting political, isn’t it time that black communities to start holding the democratic party, which runs most of these cities politically, accountable? Why do they oppose school vouchers? Because they are beholden to the teachers unions. (I am not Republican.)

          • Neighbor

            “Neighbor: “Poor white students are also underrepresented” This may be
            the case but don’t bring up yams when we’re talking about asparagus.”

            yet here you are choosing Marin county as an example of a place white students are from. Class IS part of the discussion which is why I want to bring it out in the open. Why didn’t you compare the students in the Bronx to those in Humboldt county?

            “You don’t have to be defensive. Just take a breath, look at yourself”
            YOU don’t have to be condescending, especially if you are after respectful communication and solutions.

            “How dare you. How dare you presume parents in Oakland do not place
            emphasis on their child’s education, if anything they know better than
            most what an education can do, but their environment is to drastically
            different from the college poster boy’s that for you to compare their
            child’s success to a child’s who is not environmentally stable is to
            speak from the mouth of privilege.”

            This is interesting. I was actually comparing their success to that of their fellow classmates, who were going to the same school and had similar incomes. And who were not white “poster boys”. Please try again.

          • Neighbor

            And by the way, I am speaking in defense of the black 3rd and 4th graders. Why didn’t their parents take them to the zoo once in a while? Or a nature walk or museum in the 324 choices easily accessed by public transportation in the Bay Area? And so on. And why did they let them play xbox and watch violent movies in the evenings, why so much absenteeism and coming in unprepared? I am not talking tutors. I am talking regular bedtimes, regular attendance, homework in the evenings, good breakfast. The kids had nicer shoes and backpacks than I ever had as a kid, and the classrooms were sunny and well stocked with supplies.

        • Angela Shortt

          Did it ever occur to you that what those parents had to contend with on a daily basis was stressful, on top of earning a living and paying the bills? I know this; I was a parent (well, I am still one, but my children are now grown ups), and this is probably something you have never considered because it isn’t your experience. Just being a parent is stressful enough, a working parent trying to find and keep affordable and quality child care is close to impossible, then having to leave work because one of your kids is sick…that’s enough to make someone have take blood pressure medication. If you have to deal with differential treatment, again, not experienced if you aren’t a person of color or a woman, that’s additional stress on your already perilously overloaded plate. Exhaustion is a huge problem for any working parent. Even vacations end up being tiring. Not everyone has the time or energy to take their children to the zoo. Doing laundry, cooking for the upcoming week, cleaning the house and running errands constitute a large part of the weekends. That was my experience, and I’m sure it is for many working parents. I was fortunate; my parents retired when my children were young, and they took them to the zoo and other places. I did take them to see Sesame Street Live and the movies, and I wound up falling asleep every time. Come on, now. At least TRY to step outside your own perspective. If you are a parent, you don’t seem to have the same same experiences as others. Or maybe you see those parents through a certain set of lenses, and no matter what they do, they would not meet your particular set of standards.

          • Neighbor

            That is a good point but poor immigrant families seem to manage to do those things at least once in a while, as my family did. Now many lower class white families are losing these good habits as well. But it still doesn’t matter why, there are results to not providing these experiences. I am talking basic stuff, I understand about not having time or money for sports or music lessons and that this is a real class barrier. But not for the basics like focusing on academics and an occasional family outing. As well as the things I mentioned in another comment I think, such as regular bedtimes, quiet evenings focused on homework and reading at least some of the time, a trip to the library once in a while. And regular attendance at school. Believe me when you spend all day with the kids you get a good idea what they do when they are not in school. And as an educator it is sad and frustrating to see some kids falling behind.
            Maybe community organizers could create/support programs that provide money for school field trips for these kids. I’ve never seen this problem highlighted in a SJW post and it’s a huge one. At the high school level poor kids need mentors. These are the things that will get more black kids into Berkeley. This should all be done to help underserved white kids in the NW part of the state as well. Now this will be attacked as white splaining or trying to center myself;)

          • Angela Shortt

            I have spent many days. all day, with kids in school because before I moved back to Sacramento, I volunteered to help out in my grandson’s elementary school class in Oakland. A lot of what I saw and heard was disturbing, based on my own family and educational background. My grandson’s school is truly multi-racial and cultural, with a pretty even mix of kids from Latino, Middle Eastern, Asian, Black and White homes. The cultural, and for me personally, generational differences weren’t always easy to navigate, either. I grew up in a very structured home in which there were routines that had to be followed. (My parents met in the Air Force, so structure predominated in our family.)

            I didn’t see that happening so much with the parents of the kids at my grandson’s school, regardless of their race and/or cultural background. Allowing children to stay up past 9 pm to watch television, play video games, or chat with their friends on the phone or computers–all of that was foreign to me. My behind would have been hurting if I told my parents that I wanted to stay up to watch television, and I certainly didn’t allow my kids to do it.. I was astounded when I saw that my oldest daughter was a bit too flexible with bedtime for my grandson (a source of contention between us) because I had routines, albeit not as strict, to our family life when I was raising my kids. Bedtime for them was 8:30 pm every night except Friday and Saturday, no exceptions. Homework was to be done as soon as they got home, and my parents enforced that rule when my kids went to their house after school.

            I don’t know what’s going on with my kids’ generation and what I perceive as their aversion to structure. But I don’t see it as a Black phenomenon as much as a generational practice. All of my friends had strict parents who “whupped behinds” if the family rules were violated, and the prevalence of jokes from Black comedians about “the belt” testifies that our experiences were not unusual. It’s disturbing to me to see these families eating way too much fast food or delivery pizza, instead of cooking family meals, and many of them don’t help their children with their homework, which I also did except when when my kids got beyond basic mathematics. I was fortunate that all of them were math whizzes, because that has never been a strong subject for me in school. Some of the families’ issues with helping their children with homework are related to language difficulties, others are a complete mystery to me. An aside: I also put my kids in bed by 8:30 as a form of self preservation. I was tired!

            All that aside, you mentioned that your parents are immigrants. Mine are too, hailing from the very foreign territory of the Deep South, and I write that with all seriousness. It’s a different United States of America as far as I’m concerned. I have relatives who I don’t understand what they are saying to me when they speak. However I do recognize that there are some differences in the manner that White immigrant families have assimilated into this society, and the ways Black Americans, as the result of the racial caste system, have been at best tolerated since the 60s, at worst, continued to be reviled. It might take two or more generations before the ghosts of Jim Crow and the subsequent low self regard, anger and resentment that some, but not all Black people, feel. That’s not the response you would like to read, I’m sure, but I present as example number one, the all too common reference for Black people as used by Concerned Prospective UC Parent in this discussion: thug. The ease and regularity in which that name is used pretty much explains why there are deep seated issues in regard to race. There’s a lot of mental and emotional waste material that needs to be flushed away by Black, White and all the other races of Americans. It’s not an easy proposition for anyone, and it is complicated by emotional misperceptions on both sides. This is why I believe it will take another two generations before for the people of this country will experience a greater degree of healing from this.

            The good news, I believe, is that we are laying it all out through social media, the sublime, the horrific, the beauty and the ugliness of this issue of race. Unity is possible, and despite the difficulties, we’re getting there. My parents rarely discussed the social, political and economic issues of race in America with any White people. They were born and raised in the Deep South, and mistrustful of just about all Whites. They were surprised when my siblings and I had White friends growing up, and while they were cordial toward them, but they were still wary My children have had friends of all races, in fact, my grandson’s father is White (he is not married to my oldest daughter, but he is part of our family), and my youngest daughter’s boyfriend is East Indian and White. My son dates women of all races. I never considered dating a White man when I was a teenager and a young adult, but to my children, it’s no big deal. Progress is slow, and there are so many obstacles. But it’s happening.

      • garyfouse

        Rosa,

        It is truly sad to hear this kind of talk. “Micro aggressions” and all that nonsense. Why are you at Berkeley? It is because they recruited you? Discrimination is illegal in this country. Why should a university be obligated to recruit anybody other than those who are academically qualified? When I graduated from high school in 1963, I was not accepted by UCLA, Wisconsin and Ohio University. Nobody recruited me. I went to community college for two years, then the army then Cal State LA.

        It is not the responsibility of any university to recruit black students, Hispanic students, Asian students or white students, only to accept those students who are qualified. I have no doubt, however, that Berkeley would love to have more black and Hispanic students. As critical as I am of UCB and other UC campuses, I can not accept that they are discriminating against minority students. As for retaining them, it is the responsibility of each individual student to maintain their grades so they will be “retained”.

        You should stop thinking of yourself as a victim. Don’t let your professors and others at school convince you that you are a victim. It will only become a self-fulfilling prophesy. You are attending a prestigious university and the doors are wide open. Nobody can hold you back.

        • Angela Shortt

          It’s very easy to pontificate when you haven’t had the experience.Let me explain. I grew up in a middle class home with two parents and a proliferation of books on nearly every subject known to mankind. Even though I received letters of interest (I suppose you can call them “recruitment” letters) from several colleges because I did have a high GPA,after I graduated from high school in 1976, I opted to save my parents some money and attend one of the local community colleges before transferring to California State University at Sacramento. I was not admitted through affirmative action, and I didn’t qualify for the Educational Opportunity Program because my parents’ combined income disqualified me for those funds. I was not the only one, my friends came from similar backgrounds, and we all knew that we needed to get college degrees. In fact, the only program I took advantage of was the Re-Entry program, which is for older students of any race. I went back to get to college in my thirties to get my graduate degree in English through that program.

          However, there were obstacles that, despite my good grades and determination to succeed, that made college a lot more difficult than it should have been. Apparently, based on the color of my skin, I was supposed to major in sociology, Black history, (My counselor: “We have a very good sociology department on campus, and you could minor in Black history.”), music/dance (I don’t sing, play an instrument or do anything except club dancing), and of course, criminal justice. That’s what my counselors told me. I’m glad I ignored them and declared myself an English major. I love to read and write. Those skills come in handy for a newspaper reporter, which was my first professional job, and for teaching college writing, which is what I did after I left journalism.

          But the insensitivity didn’t stop with counseling. My English professors did a double take when I walked into their classes, and a few of them asked me if I was in the right class. I guess they figured I had wandered into “The Age of Chaucer” or “Hemingway and Faulkner” by mistake, and they would kindly re-direct me to the Ethnic Studies department. I guess I was anomaly because most of the time, I was the only Black student in my classes. I didn’t let it stop me, but I was annoyed, and at times, enraged at the level of insulting, dismissive attitudes and words of the professors. One even told me to sign up for tutoring before he read any of my essays. No, I did not cuss him out. But the stare I gave him before leaving the classroom probably said a lot more than words. He gave me an A-, although his explanation of the minus never made sense to me. It was a survey class in Modern American Literature, and it was not difficult reading the way Beowulf in Old English was.

          Not all of the professors were like that. But the majority were, and that behavior was continuous. If anything, I earned my degrees in the midst of differential treatment as a form of protest.

          Most college students have problems with difficult professors, I do know that. But this was not the same kind of treatment at all. Out of the entire English department, I could honestly say that I had a cordial and relaxed relationship with only six professors. One was an elderly White gay man who excelled in teaching advanced grammar and expository writing, another was Latina who taught the literature of Latin America, a White woman who taught women’s literature and feminist literary theory, and three Black professors who only one taught Black literature, but they all encouraged me to “hang in there”. I took their advice, and I’m glad I did. But I also saw other Black students become discouraged under similar or worse circumstances, and drop out. For many of them, getting a college degree was a fulfillment of a dream and a potential source of pride for them and their families.It was hard for me to see them leave.

          This is my experience. And it was different from my fellow students who were White. You can’t dismiss someone else’s experience as inconsequential if you haven’t been through it. These issues didn’t stop me from getting my degrees, yes, that is true. But I attended supposed institutions of higher learning. It would have been a good thing if they had checked their prejudices at the door and treated me like any other English student.

          • garyfouse

            Angela,

            Good for you and your hard work and perseverance. I note that you come from a somewhat older generation and no doubt paid your dues.

            I am 69 years old, so I can remember people like James Meredith and others. Nobody would argue there has not been discrimination, but I do take issue with today’s generation of college students (not just black) who as soon as they set foot on campus are somehow victims. That is the point I am trying to make. BTW: I am an adjunct teacher at UC Irvine, so I am not viewing this from afar.

          • Angela Shortt

            You mean the Millennials? I’ve encountered that attitude with students, and it is frustrating. I see it more as the end result of those of us who raised our kids in the 80s and 90s with a sense of healthy self esteem as a backlash to our generation’s childhood rigid “RULES” (you know what they were, I’m sure). At some point, the pendulum will stop swinging between the two extreme parenting methods and balance out, maybe when my grandson becomes a parent. Now, some people are legitimately victims of abuse or oppression. My question to those who voice their discontent is, “Now that you’ve stated your position, what are you going to do about it? Do you have a plan of action, or are you going to keep complaining?” What I’ve told them that plan of action includes being very educated about the past and what’s going on now. It’s not solely based on emotional responses to situations. It must be carefully discussed and include plans based on a variety of viewpoints from people of all races and socio-economic groups. Otherwise, issues like differential treatment in institutions of learning, police brutality (which most definitely exists; my son is a very law abiding, conservative looking and acting classical musician and philosophy reading nerd, yet he was unlawfully detained TWICE in his teens by the police), poverty, bullying, rape and other social issues will continue to be unresolved. You have to speak up from a knowledgeable position, and take non violent action. I see some Millennials doing that, and obviously, it is disturbing to people who fail to understand the reasons why they do it. Let them do their thing. They will make mistakes, but so did our generation. We shouldn’t forget that.

          • garyfouse

            That discussion must also include black conservatives for whom I have great admiration. It takes courage for them to speak out because they get called Uncle Toms. That is despicable.

          • Angela Shortt

            I hope you don’t think my description of the way my son dresses also means he is politically conservative. He isn’t. His encounters with the police pretty much eliminated that possibility. He’s a “give me evidence that you are working for those of us who aren’t part of the 1%” when it comes to his political thoughts. Unfortunately, he’s often disappointed.

          • garyfouse

            I happened to be retired from law enforcement (DEA) and was a military policeman in Germany back in the late 1960s when there was a good deal of racial tension in the military. I am sorry he has had negative experiences.

            Naturally, I am following the recent police shootings. While I will defend the actions of the Ferguson cop, the one in S Carolina leaves me speechless.

          • Neighbor

            The DEA is a rogue agency and should be completely disbanded in my opinion. So much misery, corruption and turmoil and little social good has resulted from the actions of this agency. Nowadays it has morphed into a powerful, secret spy agency with offices all over the world.

          • garyfouse

            That shows you don’t know what you are talking about.

          • Neighbor

            I know a LOT about the DEA. I know that Michele Leonhart is a nutcase who should not even have a job. She has ignored orders from the white house (eg seizing shipments of hemp seeds to states that can grow legally) and tells her agents that perjury is okay. She runs a major agency like she is living out a spy fantasy. So much suffering around the world because of the drug war. And here she still is, still has a job, still lying about danger of Cannabis, believe me future generations will not be kind when it comes to the drug war.

            These are exactly the kinds of hard conversations about the police state we need to have rather than worrying about whether individual cops are racist.

          • garyfouse

            I have been retired from DEA since 1995 and admittedly don’t follow it that closely anymore. But I am proud of having been a DEA agent. I also served overseas, 3 years in Thailand and 5 years in Italy. I doubt you could do the work that we did.

            As for the marijuana laws, states that are “legalizing” marijuana are doing so in contravention of federal law, and when in conflict, federal law rules. Under federal law, it is illegal. The fact is that the current administration and Justice dept don’t want to enforce it over the states.

            Secondly, the feds are not in the business of prosecuting mere users, only dealers and traffickers. I can’t speak for every state and local jurisdiction, but had I taken a simple possession case to the US Attorney’s Office, they would have laughed me out of the office. I make no apologies for the drug traffickers I helped put in priison.

            Perjury is never OK. I testified under oath in courts hundreds of times and never committed perjury. I don’t know the basis for your charge about that. Nobody could have ordered me to commit perjury.

            I don’t know Leonhart, but I do know people that do. She was a street agent when I was still on the job. It may be that she is in over her head as agents who work their way up from the streets can be when they don’t have political pull. That is one advantage of bringing in someone from the outside to run an agency. I have never heard her say that she is a nutcase.

            As for marijuana itself, there are harmful effects especially for young users. The research is still going on, and the more that comes out, the more harmful, it is known to be. Of course, it is much stronger now than in my day.

            You are, of course, frees to dismiss everything I say. I really don’t care.

        • blackalaureate

          gary, there hasn’t been affirmative action in california for several years.

          the fact that you assume this is the case for rosa is telling. it actually highlights why affirmative action is necessary.

          • garyfouse

            Blackalaureate,

            I assumed no such thing. Read my comment again.

          • blackalaureate

            “Why are you at Berkeley? It is because they recruited you? “

          • Neighbor

            Please explain. I believe UCB IS trying to recruit black and Latino students. Encouraging students to apply is not the same as affirmative action.

          • blackalaureate

            my point exactly, however in gary’s post, the assumption is implied that recruitment and “discrimination” (ie, AA) are linked and is
            probably the case for rosa.

      • TheOne BillyGunn

        You would get that reaction when, unfortunately, as a group you are disproportionately responsible for violent crimes. That’s how people react to pit bulls because of their violent nature. No different with blacks.

        • blackalaureate

          it’s “black people,” not blacks.

          also, considering the violence and history of white people, would it be safe to assume that you are an unsavory individual as well?

          • Neighbor

            He does sound pretty unsavory, and I agree with you that state violence or other forms of sublimated violence count and it all probably evens out in the end as far as how violent any group’s “nature” is. People like him like to defend themselves as not racist because they say Asians are even less violent than white people (again going by US street crime) but even there is a paradox, esp regarding state violent repression and shocking (to other cultures) animal cruelty in China for example. However he is right about violent street crime in US cities being more commonly attributable to young black males, and that is something real and visceral to people in their daily lives. If a young female Asian American student (typical UCB iow) is walking through or near campus after dark and sees a group of young black males up ahead and seeks to avoid passing near them, is she racial profiling or racist? Especially if she would not have done the same if the males were Asian…

          • blackalaureate

            again, “black on black crime” has as little to do with a discussion about police brutality than “white on white crime” does. they are both non sequiturs.

          • Neighbor

            My question directly addresses the racial profiling accusation of black students at UCB that has come up in this discussion. Are we actually discussing police brutality toward black students on the UCB campus?? I am not aware of a single incident let alone a trend.

          • blackalaureate

            i wasn’t responding to “your question,” initially. i was responding to billy gunn’s post.

          • Neighbor

            Well when you click on the reply button it USUALLY means that you are responding to that posters particular post. But I can see you make up your own rules, studies, evidence etc as you see fit. So whatever.

          • blackalaureate

            i thought this was “goodbye?”

            ah well.

          • Neighbor

            Still scrolling down the thread. Grow up. You are adding nothing to the conversation.

          • blackalaureate

            no need to get hostile. that’s not very neighborly of you.

            i’m adding plenty to the conversation. your problem is that you just don’t agree and/or you don’t understand. the problem lies within you…it’s not with my posts.

          • peepsqueek

            It is the amount of street crime in any community that determines the amount of aggressive street cops that will be coming to your neighborhood. So there is a direct connection.

          • blackalaureate

            correlation, not causation. police brutalize black people whether or not they have committed crimes or have done anyone harm. black people who do not even live in or frequent high crime areas have been mistreated by police.

          • peepsqueek

            I am not disagreeing with you. I have also seen the cases of non-black people brutalized by black people that do not live in or frequent high crime areas. Correlation or causation of police reactions?

            In a perfect world no one would be brutalized and no cops would be needed. Like I have said before, look at the police websites in your community, any community, and see all the pictures and videos of the street perps, career criminals, repeat offenders, etc, and you will know what the profile is of the criminals running around your neighborhood. The cops look at these pictures all the time. Tens of thousands of stops are made across this Country everyday of the year, and they are uneventful.

            If any of these recent televised events of negative outcomes between cops and suspects, had began with the suspect giving full cooperation to the Officer, the chances of being brutalized in front of witnesses, in broad daylight, in front of the police car dash-cam, etc, would be very close to zero, even if the cop was unstable. Tell your children to fully cooperate with the police if they should stop you, especially if you have any priors. Don’t run, don’t struggle, don’t punch a cop in the face through his police car window. Yes sir and no sir are only requirement to get home or taken in safely. Even if you do not respect the cop– show some respect until you can address the situation in a different environment. If you suggest otherwise, you are doing a disservice to you children.

          • blackalaureate

            the cases of black people who are innocent and who have been mistreated by cops (and judges/lawyers/etc) are in greater number than any other racial group.

            look at the prison exoneration cases. most people who were wrongfully arrested and convicted are black men.

          • peepsqueek

            No one can deny that these things happen. How do you know your numbers to be an actual fact or a matter of media attention. What is your primary source for those statistics? And what were the circumstances under which many of the alleged abuses took place? If you have done nothing wrong, don’t verbally abuse an Officer, don’t run, don’t struggle, do not provoke under any circumstances.

          • blackalaureate

            i don’t know the statistics. i don’t need them because as a black person who knows black people, i live it. i have nothing to prove statistically to you or anyone else about waking up and living in the skin i’m in.

          • peepsqueek

            Have you even lived in the skin of a cop? The old walk a mile in my shoes routine?

            February 21, 2005 New York Times: “For the first time in history, more blacks are coming to the United States from Africa than during the slave trade: Since 1990, according to immigration figures, more Africans have arrived voluntarily than the total who disembarked in chains before the United States outlawed international slave trafficking in 1807. In New York City, about 1 in 3 blacks are foreign born.”

            Having spent enough time in Africa, it is not hard to see why. Most of the young ambitious people that I met in Africa would do very well here. When I was in Kenya, they were encouraging young people with an education to leave the Country to find better opportunities.

          • blackalaureate

            i’m not concerned about a cop’s skin because being a cop isn’t a racial social group.

          • blackalaureate

            ” If you have done nothing wrong, don’t verbally abuse an Officer, don’t run, don’t struggle, do not provoke under any circumstances.”

            ^^^slave catcher mentality

          • TheOne BillyGunn

            I love the ad hominem! I am not trying to be politically correct. I’m being a realist. Blacks are just as wary of blacks as everyone else. There is research to back that statement. Nobody is wary of Asians. It’s not racism. It’s just the way it is.

          • Angela Shortt

            I’ve lived in Japan and Philippines, and I beg to differ. I’ve seen plenty reasons to be wary of SOME Asians, downright horrifying reasons.

          • TheOne BillyGunn

            I agree, but I’m just talking about the situation here in the States.

          • Angela Shortt

            You have no idea how well placed and dangerous some of those Asian gangs are. An entire family was slaughtered in San Francisco not long ago. And yes, Asians tend to kill Asians, and they benefit from the cultural “don’t talk” rule. Until this affects outsiders like you and me, we don’t care much. They are quiet, unlike noisy Black people who keep stirring up things with their silly protests, right?

          • TheOne BillyGunn

            A protest involving Black people isn’t silly. Most protests are exercises in futility just like the protest on campus. Terrible leadership lends to terrible results.

          • Angela Shortt

            You are entitled to your opinion. But if that were the case, Jim Crow would still the law in the South, and possibility spread to the North. Thank God we never had to experience that, although there has been de facto segregation practiced all across the country.

          • WillowJewell

            Those numbers are skewed a bit because of the greater surveillance that black people experience in their daily lives. I have never committed a crime, never received so much as a traffic ticket. And yet I have been followed around grocery stores and been pulled over for no reason.
            When you take into account laws that ( and may still be on the books in some cities and states) empowered police to stop and search people without probable cause; and the provable fact that those laws were disproportionately applied to African-American people; you will find that more black people get caught and than whites or other less surveilled minorities.
            Some of the numbers may say that more Black people and up in the criminal justice system but they can’t tell you how many more whites and others get away with crimes simply because the police aren’t looking at them.

          • Neighbor

            Your argument is more valid when used for the petty crimes you describe and things like drug use (yes stop and frisk laws are racist) but falls apart when discussing violent crime. I can’t believe that “white people are committing just as many armed robberies and murders they just get away with it because no one cares”

          • WillowJewell

            Well, when discussing violent crime it’s been proven that poverty please greatest role in whether or not people commit violent crimes, regardless of race.

          • TheOne BillyGunn

            It doesn’t quite work that way. I’m going off of statistics regarding crime. You want to distort history to fit your argument, which is rather dishonest of you.

          • blackalaureate

            it does work that way. you only want to see it a certain way in order to fit your feelings about black people. that’s fine, just be honest about it.

      • 69GeorgeWBush69

        garbage

      • admission to the university should be based on merit alone. recruitment and retention of minority students is not the responsibility of either the university or the great state of California.

    • Angela Shortt

      How do you know that Black students haven’t been inconvenienced at Berkeley? Can you qualify that statement with facts? You’ve written essays and provided documentation to back up your statements, right? So, enlighten us with some scholarly insights.

      • garyfouse

        Angela,

        I don’t work at Berkeley, but I do teach part-time at UC Irvine. It seems more appropriate that you document your case than I try to prove a negative. How are they being inconvenienced?

        I am not closed minded on this and maybe you can find the answer you seek in what I wrote to other reader comments.

        • Angela Shortt

          Fair enough.

  • “BSU members have criticized the chancellor’s response to these demands,
    which Santifer described as dismissive, and have urged for more
    immediate action.”

    I think I would be pretty dismissive too

    • Dana

      In September 1998, the United States Congress passed a non-binding resolution asking Cuba for the return of Shakur as well as 90 fugitives believed by Congress to be residing in Cuba; House
      Concurrent Resolution 254 passed 371–0 in the House and by unanimous consent in the Senate. In 2013 the FBI announced it had made Shakur the first woman on its list of most wanted terrorists. The reward for her capture and return was also doubled to $2 million that year.

  • 1776

    If attending the #1 public university in the world is causing you to be inconvenience…maybe you should just go home?

    • John

      Most black college students have far more privilege than many poor white people do; but that doesn’t matter in the oppression Olympics, where every group is committed to convincing themselves they are so deeply oppressed.

      • CheckYourIgnorance

        And most poor white people have far more privilege than many poor (insert ANY other race) people do. You can’t compare races between different socioeconomic statuses like that. It’s a fallacy in and of itself. There are too many variables unaccounted for in that correlation.

        • Dana

          Wrong O— these Assata admirers are at this place because of their race and the failed perception of vibrant diversity in the admission’s process.

          • Rosa Hernandez

            You so don’t understand admissions lol did you even get into this school? My money is on no.

          • CheckYourIgnorance

            HA! Affirmative action was struck down in California’s public schools you jackrabbit. But I don’t expect you to be competent, so….your ignorance isn’t forgiven, but it’s not significant.

          • Mark Talmont

            There has been a stampede over Prop 209 in the courts and especially in administrative procedures whereby the one-party government operatives achieve their objective of de facto quotas “by any means necessary”. Extra points for bilingual is one trick. Mainly they have control of all the hiring procedures which start with the white males going straight into the “circular file.” The particular case of Berkeley city schools is notable in that children are still assigned to school sites on a racially allocated basis; the Pacific Legal Foundation sued to put a stop to this but a local judge ruled for Berkeley’s quota system anyway. BTW the 300 point gap between white and black test scores at Berkeley High is a monument to this kind of thinking which has been in place since 1968.

          • CheckYourIgnorance

            Trust that if affirmative action were taking place at a rate that white supremacists think it is, the UC Black population would be higher. And test scores amongst minorities are traditionally lower. This is a fact. Studies show, though, that these test scores project academic performance at different levels with certain trends amongst races. Black students don’t perform as well on Standardized tests despite possibly getting better grades than a white classmate. Why? Stereotype threat is one psychologically confirmed/validated reason. The other being consequences of prolonged generational and sometimes cultural factors. I say cultural with hesitation since culture is continuously shaped and reformed. Additionally, implicit biases amongst professors and staff have traceable consequences. We’ve shifted from explicit bias to a more insidious counterpart.

        • Neighbor

          There are very few poor white students on campus. And they have no support or clubs. why do you need to be so heartless? Every discussion of classism is immediately shut down by ignorant words like yours.

          • CheckYourIgnorance

            I have a request from you. Of the low-income population on campus, can you pull the statistics and percentages? Thank you.

          • Neighbor

            I’ve looked for those stats and cannot find them. They are only available separately (race and first generation to go to college as a proxy for class). But I speak from experience of being poor white and a TA. In my field Asian students are the majority and everybody else is under-represented, not just PoC. Many of those are first gen Asian American. Most white students seem to have MD or academic parents even though CA has many lower class whites in the North especially. Are we reaching out to those young people?

          • CheckYourIgnorance

            It’s true that there are few poor white people. And they are overlooked. I won’t deny that. And I don’t know how to fix it. Not sure how society can balance remedying racism and disproportionate social trends. But you still do have to take into account proportionality. And compounded marginalization. The chances of achieving upward mobility for a poor White person is greater…but if they don’t have the chance to use that privilege, then is it a privilege at all? Something to think about.

          • John

            > And I don’t know how to fix it

            Here is a start: Stop being racist! You. You personally buy into suspect racist ideologies, and its because of people like you doing that, that we are overlooking poor white people.

          • CheckYourIgnorance

            LOL! You seriously want to discuss people not being racist? Read up on implicit biases. Even me daring to scrutinize racism is acting against my own biases against black people. We’re all conditioned to think White is right. And it’s actually documented with empirical study. Ask any accredited Psychology department.

          • John

            > Even me daring to scrutinize racism is acting against my own biases against black people.

            You need to do better than that. You seem like you are trying to compensate for your biases by smothering them with another racist ideology.

          • CheckYourIgnorance

            You can’t really compensate for bias. It’s like air. You can never get rid of it. But you do have to apply corrective open-mindedness. There are particular interventions available to fight bias. We really are all primed to think that White is right and Black is wrong. Google Scholar search Jennifer Eberhardt

          • Patricia Lin

            40%% if Berkeley students are recipients of Pell grants. These are only available to low income students eg students from family with income not exceeding ~$30k for family of 4. This figure far exceeds most colleges and is an official figure.