Banks’ performance is worthy, rich investment at The Warfield

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Alice Langford/Staff

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While disconcerted moans and anomalous dance moves might seem like a strange combination, Banks’ performance at The Warfield proved that her avant-garde style makes for a spectacular show. Her sultry music, mixed with the smoky ambiance of the theater, made for a night that her fans surely won’t forget.

The audience roared in anticipation as Banks’ band walked out, but when three veiled figures entered the stage, audience members were immediately perplexed. But the second the center veiled figure began to sing, it was clear that these costumes were an addition to Banks’ chilling opening song “Poltergeist.” Not only did the songstress use two microphones during her performance, but she also managed to dance along with her backup dancers, proving the artist’s talents expand further than her gifted voice. The zombie-like dance moves, smoky stage and dark costumes recalled Michael Jackson’s “Thriller” and were a brilliant opening to her show.

Following the successful opener, Banks removed her veil and began singing another popular track, “Fuck With Myself.” Fans sang along and danced, everyone attempting to mimic Banks’ swaying dance moves. The soft lighting would often change from red to white and would occasionally fall black at big breaks in the songs, effectively keeping the audience hooked. In addition, Banks would reach her hand out into the audience, displaying her true passion for bringing music to the people.

“If you know this song, I want you guys to sing every single fucking word,” the singer prefaced prior to singing her song “Trainwreck.” But that was not the only song in the night to which the audience sang along. It seemed like every fan there knew every word to every song and was not shy about showing it.

Banks herself was not shy when it came to showing her fans that she loved them just as much. “This song is for everyone who’s been here for me since day one,” she exclaimed as she began singing “This Is What It Feels Like.” The booming sounds from the speakers electrified the audience, and Banks’ mesmerizing high notes and interactions with her band added a new dimension to the already stellar concert.

Eventually, Banks referenced more personal anecdotes before her songs. For example, prior to singing the ariose chanting that is “Better,” she noted, “I started writing when I was 14 years old,” and she described her song as a “melodic chant that feels relaxing and meditating to me” and a “random phrase somehow becomes a concept I didn’t even know I had to express.” This added to the audience’s admiration for the artist and successfully put the audience in a relaxed and meditative mood, as the artist intended.

“I felt like I was smushed into this box, and it was depressing me,” Banks explained before beginning her song “Mother Earth.” ”After writing this song I allowed myself to take up more space and become the person I know that I am.” While most of her other songs had a subtle red, blue or white light, “Mother Earth” had a grand purple background that further defined the importance of the song. Banks’ smile was contagious, and soon, the entire audience was smiling with her.

Not only did the audience want an encore after her final song, but the band clearly wanted one as well. Members each came out and encouraged clapping from the audience, so much so that an encore seemed inevitable; she performed her popular tracks “27 Hours” and “This Is Not About Us” and it was everything the audience wanted and more.

Banks’ performance was as unique as the music she produces is. The audience was entranced by her idiosyncratic dance moves and loved every second of her expressive moaning. The clapping seemed as if it would end, and by the last song of the encore it was clear Banks was incredibly grateful to her fans and their contributions to her success. She blew kisses to her audience as she slowly left the stage, leaving everyone with an increased interest in her success.

Contact Samantha Banchik at [email protected].