The ups and downs of adulting

Coloredited_Adulthood_Crystal_Zhong
Crystal Zhong/File

Adulting is hard, but adulting is fun. Every college-age adult knows this, especially us Cloggers. The struggle is real. Sometimes you have days when you clean your room, finish all your homework and all with time to spare in the evening. Other days are spent inside watching Netflix. Adulting still means that life vacillates – one thing that never changes.

Heading out into the abyss of independence means unfamiliarity. It’s a scary transition, but one that lends itself to a feeling of freedom and maturity. Living away from home gives one the feeling of starting a new chapter, in essence becoming a stable and self-sufficient human being.

The reality, however, is quite different. While the physical distance between young adults and their parents often results in the formation of a more definitive, distinct personality, many unforeseen challenges lie ahead. Doing taxes is somehow harder than linear algebra. Creating a budget – and actually sticking to it – becomes a thing that you need to do. In the end, your own self-sufficiency and self-regulation abilities are called into question.

What makes trying to be an adult especially hard is the times we live in. 2017 is the age of instant gratification and media overabundance. It’s a time similar to the one described in Huxley’s “Brave New World,” in which constant stimulation distracts people from societal problems. Similarly, new adults today are distracted by social networks, new technologies and chaotic political events. It’s hard to feel safe and self-sufficient in such confusing circumstances. It’s hard to be an adult when addictive technologies and stimulation degrade our ability to delay gratification.

Part of me longs for the days in kindergarten, when the only important decision was whether I should use the purple or pink crayon. But life has changed since then. We’re “adults” now and turning 18 changes a lot. Adulting is hard in modern times, but it remains a fun and independent endeavor.

Contact Melany Dillon at [email protected].

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