A study of British humor at the Edinburgh Festival Fringe

Edinburgh
India Clare/Staff

In 1947, the Edinburgh Festival Fringe was born from a group of acts who were told they could not perform at the Edinburgh International Festival. Instead, they performed on the fringe of the festival and, hence, the name and event were born, encouraging weird and wonderful acts from all over the globe to take part.

Edinburgh is a gorgeous city. It was where J.K. Rowling lived while she was writing her first Harry Potter book. You can see as you walk along the winding cobbled streets where some of the inspiration for Diagon Alley came from. A lot of the buildings in the city center are made out of a dark sandstone which, mixed with the gothic architecture and steep hills, makes for a very dramatic and beautiful landscape.

The Fringe can be a hit or miss, but all of the shows we saw were fantastic. Here are some of my top hits.

Let’s start with the performance, “Police Cops in Space.” Although it’s a sequel to the previous year’s show, a recap is given at the start so you don’t miss a beat. From the name, it can be inferred that the piece falls within the genre of science fiction, with two fellows on a journey to defeat an evil ruler. It does what it says on the tin, and it is absolutely hilarious.

Continuing, “Laid” is a one-woman show, starring Natalie Palamides. It follows a female who lays an egg everyday and must decide whether to raise it or to eat it. It is a bizarre performance with a lot of audience participation. Trust me as well when I say it gets quite messy. If you don’t want either of those, sit further back.

Overall, Fringe is another must-attend event if ever on a summer Euro-trip. It runs for the whole month of August, and it is a wonderful way to get to know the ins and outs and the subtleties of British sarcasm.

Contact India Clare at [email protected].

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