ASUC meeting to discuss bill against doxing following Milo Yiannopoulos’ harassment incident falls through

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A special ASUC Senate meeting was called Saturday to consider an anti-doxing bill ahead of the now-canceled “Free Speech Week,” but it failed to gather the minimum number of senators required to hold a meeting.

ASUC President Zaynab AbdulQadir-Morris called the meeting Thursday to discuss SR-14, or “Enumerating Prohibitions Against Doxxing and Outing.” Doxing is the publishing of an individual’s information on the internet without their consent. With only five senators present, however, a quorum of 11 senators could not be established and the resolution could not be voted on.

Only ASUC senators Connor Hughes, Hani Hussein, Nuha Khalfay, Rizza Estacio and Juniperangelica Cordova-Goff were in attendance. AbdulQadir-Morris did not attend the meeting.

According to Estacio, primary sponsor of SR-14, several of the senators had legal concerns about the bill.

“The numbers started chipping away … but this was a chance for us to work on it together,” Estacio said. “I know it is hasty and rash, but we have to do it for our communities.”

The bill, if passed, would have treated all threats and attempted doxxing incidents as if their intent had actually been carried out and would have punished all threats accordingly. The bill text criticized the University of California for a lack of protections for marginalized communities, and it cited a surge in online harassment activity in recent years as reasons to enact prohibitions against doxing and outing.

This bill also comes in the wake of a recent harassment incident committed by right-wing firebrand Milo Yiannopoulos against several campus students, including Cordova-Goff. Yiannopoulos posted screenshots Wednesday on Instagram of Cordova-Goff washing chalk graffiti targeting undocumented and LGBTQ communities off of Sproul Plaza, which sparked online harassment against Cordova-Goff from Yiannopoulos’ supporters.

“Special action was necessary because when Milo came last year, he threatened to call ICE on undocumented students,” Estacio said in an email. “I (and some other senators) wanted to take preventative and punitive measures to ensure that something like this wouldn’t happen again.”

Azwar Shakeel is the lead student government reporter. Contact him at [email protected] and follow him on Twitter at @azwarshakeel12.

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  • Nunya Beeswax

    What authority would this bill have, anyway? The ASUC is a glorified student council, with no state mandate to prosecute or punish crimes.

  • SMH

    …………..

    MILO YIANNOPOULOS HAS MADE A **FOOL** OF THE UC BERKELEY CHANCELLOR & THE ENTIRE UNIVERSITY IN THE UNIVERSITY’S SPENDING OF **$800,000** TO **$1,000,000** FOR MILO’S SMUG SELF-SERVING 20 MINUTE PHOTO-OP & AUTOGRAPH SESSION.

    BUT IT *DOES* SHOW THAT THE CHANCELLOR CAN COME UP WITH SUCH MONEY WHEN THE CHANCELLOR *WANTS* TO DO SO — MONEY THAT COULD GO TO ETHNIC STUDIES & OTHER DIVERSITY *ENRICHMENT* EDUCATIONAL / ACADEMIC PROGRAMS, INSTEAD OF EDUCATIONAL / ACADEMIC CUTS OR SHORTCOMINGS.

    …………..

    • SMH

      …………..

      And, actually, the TV news said it was only 15 minutes!

      $800,000/15minutes = over **$53,000** per **minute**!!

      $1,000,000/15 minute = almost **$67,000** per **minute**!!

      …………..

    • The bill, if passed, would have treated all threats and attempted doxxing incidents as if their intent had actually been carried out and would have punished all threats accordingly. The bill text criticized the University of California for a lack of protections for marginalized communities, and it cited a surge in online harassment activity in recent years as reasons to enact prohibitions against doxing and outing.