The commitment conundrum: Taking on too much during the semester

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Crystal Zhong/File

We genuinely believed that we could do it all at the beginning of the year. But alas, we were mistaken. The three clubs, two jobs and one frat that we committed to during the first week of school seemed way more manageable before classes had started assigning homework. As week six (how is it week six already!?) comes at us like a bat out of hell, we’re beginning to realize that we may have bitten off a little more than we could chew this year. But you know what they say, hindsight is always 20/20. 

A tiny part of us thought that we were overdoing it just a smidge at the time, but we assured ourselves that a couple more clubs never killed anybody. Boy, were we wrong. The reality of responsibility has set in and we are tragically aware of how we’ve grossly misjudged our ability to juggle our new activities with classes. It’s week six and we’re hardcore floundering as we try to get a grip on our life amidst the turmoil of midterms. 

It pains us to ghost our club meetings and flake on the social that we committed to last week. We don’t like that we were late to work a couple times last month and we hate the fact that our pledge master probably doesn’t remember what we look like. It’s not like we want to be spread thinner than our GSI’s patience during Friday’s discussion, it’s just that we’re really bad at time management and have accidentally subscribed to about four too many weekly activities. We want to be able to do it all as much as Carol Christ takes advantage of her emailing prowess. Way too much. 

The truth of the matter is that we only have 24 hours in our day. As much as we’d like to add on a few bonus hours to make it possible to do more, the whole sun planet orbit situation makes it pretty tough to do anything about the length of the day. Sometimes, we just need to step back and remind ourselves that we’re students before all else. The point of us going to UC Berkeley is to get an education that we’ll use for the rest of our lives. We aren’t here to have a hernia over the excessive number of business consulting organizations that we’re a part of. So here’s to relaxing our self-inflicted expectations and enjoying what we do accomplish.

Contact Amanda Chung at [email protected].