UCLA jumps up 8 spots, beats UC Berkeley in full-time MBA program rankings

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UC Berkeley Haas School of Business was ranked below UCLA Anderson School of Management in the Economist’s full-time MBA rankings for 2017.

While UCLA jumped eight spots in its world ranking — from the 14th-best MBA program in 2016 to the sixth-best in 2017 — Berkeley remained seventh-best.

The ratings are based on surveys that the Economist conducts on MBA programs every year, according to the Economist’s methodology report. Two surveys were conducted: one covers quantitative information, such as graduating salaries, and the other considers qualitative data, such as ratings and reviews by current and recently graduated MBA students. This year’s ranking criteria includes networking potential, new career opportunities, and personal development and educational experience, such as students and faculty quality.

The Economist invited 153 schools to participate in its ranking process, and it selected the top 100 for its list.

Spokespeople for Haas declined to comment on the ranking.

Brittany McLellan, a first-year graduate student at Haas Business School, said she thought the rigor and collaborative nature of Haas had earned the school a spot as a top program.

“Haas has consistently been considered a Top 10 Program,” McLellan said in an email. “I think the ranking is reflective that the program has continued to innovate and improve. I feel incredibly fortunate to be enrolled at Haas.”

The methodology report stated that rankings were “little more than an indication of the MBA market at a particular moment.” According to the report, these rankings can change quickly and are not definitive.

McLellan also said she thought that UCLA’s Anderson School of Management was another strong program.

“I am delighted to see another West Coast school move up in the rankings,” McLellan said. “Both programs have individual and compelling strengths.”

Contact Mary Kelly Ford at [email protected] and follow her on Twitter at @MaryKellyFord1.

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  • jim hoch

    The ranking are inherently unfair. They prioritize actual study and scholarship over intersectionality.