Battling the back-to-school blues: why it’s OK to be sad about going back to school

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Nishali Naik/Staff

It happens to the best of us. We’re totally ready to learn and thrive during the 15 weeks of fun times ahead as we gear up for another semester. Yet, as we head back to our city by the Bay, we’re greeted with an all-too-familiar pang of sadness. It seems as though our hearts have betrayed our minds as the dreaded back-to-school blues kick in.

It’s not that we don’t love our school or the friends that we have here. In fact, it’s just the opposite. The opportunities, lessons and relationships that are available to us make our toes tingle. We’re forever grateful for the time that we get to spend at such a prestigious school full of bright people and even brighter professors. It’s just that the comforts and joys of home are a real pain in the tuchus to part from.

In a funny way, it’s a blessing that we’re so sad to go because it means the people and place that we call home are truly loved. The discomfort that we face with our departure shows us how special our home is. The longing we have for our best friend reaffirms our suspicion that soul mates exist. The pangs of sadness we experience when we think about our sister confirm that Beyoncé and Solange would be jealous of our sisterly bond. The struggle we face when parting with our mom proves that, just as the mug we gave her for Christmas says, she truly is the World’s Best Mom.

It’s tempting to shut down and deny these emotional afflictions. Good thing we don’t need to. The heroes among us, our roommates and friends, are always there to pick us up when we’re down. Their patience as we readjust is truly saintly. Their comfort in our time of readjustment is a saving grace of which we are not worthy. Thanks to their support, it’s only a matter of days before we revert to bleeding blue and gold and shouting “Go Bears!” in our sleep.

It’s okay to be sad to leave home. The home-cooked meals and quality time with friends and family are tough to beat. Just remember that a comfort zone is a beautiful place, but nothing ever grows there.

Contact Amanda Chung at [email protected].