Redefining the ‘Me’ in #MeToo: Campus resources for LGBTQ+ survivors

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Rachael Garner/File

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There are some sexual harassment support resources that are specific to LGBTQ+ community at UC Berkeley. The problem is, according to ASUC Senator Juniperangelica Cordova, that there are so few of these resources and that they lack visibility because of the erasure of queer and trans experiences. Despite this disparity, here are a few resources:

Seeking resources:

Paula Flamm, manager of social services at the Tang Center, said in an email that LGBTQ+ students who seek counseling services at the Tang Center may request to see a queer-identifying counselor or a medical provider from the Trans Care Team. The costs of most of the services will be fully covered for all student survivors.

Flamm said in an email that Social Services is offering two groups for woman-identified survivors of sexual violence and intimate partner violence that meet Tuesdays at 4-5:30 p.m. and Wednesdays at 3:30-5 p.m., respectively. In addition, there is a Queer Men Support group for cisgender and transgender students that meets Wednesdays from 4:15-5:30 p.m.

To contact Social Services at Tang Center, call 510-642-6074.

According to Joy Evans, assistant director for survivor support services at the PATH to Care Center — which is the campus help center for survivors of sexual harassment and violence — the PATH to Care Center provides survivors with confidential one-on-one advocacy. The PATH to Care Center helps individuals decide their immediate and long-term needs, whether they be financial, housing or academic, after experiencing sexual assault, intimate partner violence, stalking or sexual harassment.

For 24/7 support, call the PATH to Care Center’s Care Line at 510-643-2005.

PATH to Care advocates can guide survivors to file a police report or report an incident to the campus Office for the Prevention of Harassment and Discrimination.

“Every confidential advocate that is hired must have the experience and the skills to support the LGBTQIA community navigate and access systems that are often cis/het-centric,” Evans said in an email. “Advocates acknowledge the ways that cisgenderism, heterosexism, racism, and sexism all contribute to gendered violence.”

For PATH to Care feedback, contact Joy Evans at [email protected].

The impact:

“To me, as a Queer and Trans person, this movement is a recognition that I am not alone. It is an opportunity to offer survivors a community of support when speaking out, while also demanding that society reevaluates our thoughts of assault,” Cordova said in an email.

Evans said the ramifications for LGBTQ+ survivors are “different and unique,” considering that the violence can intersect with other forms of discrimination, and there is a lack of resources for the LGBTQ+ community.

Flamm said in an email that sexual assault trauma experienced alongside homophobia and transphobia can result in “cumulative trauma,” which may prolong one’s recovery.

“The more one blames oneself, the harder it can be to seek support and healing,” Flamm said in an email. “ALL survivors are entitled to heal and we encourage students of all identities to seek support from whomever and wherever they feel most comfortable.”

According to Evans, many anti-violence movements  which extend to anti-sexual assault, intimate partner violence and stalking — have failed the LGBTQ+ community. While the PATH to Care Center is committed to serving the needs of LGBTQ+ survivors, it is open to community input and feedback.

“It is critical to not only validate Queer/Trans survivors, but also, it is vital to ending sexual assault that we must be intentional in discussing assault within our own community,” Cordova said in an email. “We must uplift trauma, survivors and community accountability.”

Resources mentioned in this article:

Social Services is offering two groups for woman-identified survivors of sexual and intimate partner violence that meet Tuesdays at 4-5:30 p.m. or Wednesdays at 3:30-5 p.m.

In addition, there is a Queer Men Support group for cisgender and transgender students that meets Wednesdays from 4:15-5:30 p.m.

To contact Social Services at Tang Center, call 510-642-6074.

For 24/7 support, call the PATH to Care Center’s Care Line at 510-643-2005.

For PATH to Care feedback, contact Joy Evans at [email protected].

Francesca Munsayac is the lead race and diversity reporter. Contact her at [email protected] and follow her on Twitter at @fcfm_dc.