Carol Christ plans to only serve a 5-year term as UC Berkeley chancellor

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Chancellor Carol Christ intends to stay for only five years, or one term, as UC Berkeley’s chancellor.

After serving the campus for more than 30 years as both a professor and administrator, Christ has confirmed that she is nearing the end of her career.

In an interview with The Daily Californian’s Editorial Board, Christ said she hopes that the campus will be ready for a successor five years from now. Christ was confirmed as chancellor-designate by the UC Board of Regents on March 16, 2017, after a search for a replacement for former chancellor Nicholas Dirks. She took office as UC Berkeley’s 11th chancellor July 1, 2017.

“It was based on her assessment of how much time she needs on the (campus) goals,” said campus spokesperson Dan Mogulof. “Everyone makes their own personal calculation.”

In fall 2017, Christ identified her five goals for her time as chancellor: building community, enhancing the undergraduate experience, enabling more research for the public good, progressing on diversity and developing a new financial model for the campus. In an interview with the Daily Cal, Christ said she hopes in five years’ time the campus will have made important decisions and be on the right track.

Former chancellor Nicholas Dirks started his term in 2013 and announced his resignation in August 2016, before officially stepping down in 2017. Previous campus chancellors Robert Birgeneau and Robert Berdahl served 2004–2013 and 1997–2004, respectively.

Lengths of service for campus chancellors range from as short as Glenn Seaborg’s three-year term (1958–1961) to as long as Ira Michael Heyman’s 10-year term (1980–1990).

“That’s just a decision (Christ has) made,” Mogulof said. “And also her assessment it will take to do the important things she wants to get done.”

Contact Ella Smith at [email protected] and follow her on Twitter at @EllaSmithCA.

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