That is, for example

It seems like every time I want to use i.e. or e.g. in my writing, I have to Google the meaning of each to avoid an embarrassing mishap on a paper. And I don’t think I’m the only one who gets these Latin abbreviations mixed up. E.g., which means exempli
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Diary of a hot-and-cold copy editor

Dear Diary, Sept. 30, 2013 — Working at a newspaper’s copy desk is already so much fun! I learned so much today about AP style. For instance, “convince” and “persuade” are not synonymous. How can even the most seasoned of copy editors possibly wrap their head around so many intricate
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On the semicolon

I loved using semicolons when I was really young. I had no idea what they represented or how one was supposed to apply them, but I just thought they looked cool, so I threw them haphazardly into my sentences wherever I thought one would fit aesthetically. The frequency only worsened
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The acronym POV

What do “NATO,” “TNT,” “sonar,” “AMC,” “AIDS,” “laser,” and “SEAL” have in common? OK, so it’s an easy question — obviously, they are all acronyms. In fact, though, that’s wrong! Most of the general populace is aware that these particular chunks of letters abbreviate strings of authentic English words with
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Sometimes it’s right to be wrong

When Edgar Bergen ventriloquized the words, “Who’da thunk it?” in the early 1940s, little did he know that his dim-witted, buck-toothed puppet would come to popularize the ever-growing phenomenon of purposeful grammatical inaccuracy in idiomatic expressions. Bad grammar is everywhere, much to the chagrin of any copy editor or language
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Double spaces need to go. Period.

Long, long ago in the era before the age of computers — yep, we’re going waaaaaaay back — there existed a certain machine in almost every home.  It wasn’t a fancy contraption with chrome plating and a luminous partly eaten apple on the side.  In fact, it was essentially a
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A tense situation

Ring, rang, rung. Shrink, shrank, shrunk. Begin, began, begun. Confused? It seems that some words undergo orthographic gymnastics to be conjugated properly into the past tense. While moving from present to past tense is, in many cases, as simple as adding “ed,” certain words require a little more finagling and,
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The all-important hyphen

Hyphens can make all the difference in the world, at least in the world of proper diction and syntactical clarity. After all, living in a co-op is — hopefully — not the same as living in a coop, and being an aggressive-squirrel breeder is not the same as being an
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Reading between the words

Does this question look  weird to you? Between “look” and “weird,” there are two spaces instead of one. See it? Depending upon how closely you have been reading this post, the superfluous keystroke can be completely jarring — or your eyes may have slid right past it. But for a
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