We spy: human wired sculptures around campus

Corinne Platten/Staff

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Lately, the Clog’s spotted these two funky sculptures all over campus. The two buddies in the photo can be found hanging out by the UC Berkeley School of Law. Since we don’t know who the artist is or what he or she intended to convey with these pieces, the Clog is stepping in to offer our own interpretation of the installation, which we’ve dubbed “a deep reflection of the dependence on modern-day technology in relation to students.” Or something like that.

As the figures indicate, as students, we often feel like we’re living our life through cords and gadgets. Getting ready to head out to class in the morning usually involves running through a mental checklist of devices to make sure we’ve got it all. Forget the days when all you needed was a pencil and a notepad — now, we’re talking laptops, laptop chargers, smartphones, iPads and much more. These things can basically be understood as the modern-day equivalent of the axe and bow of the Stone Age, something you just don’t leave your home without if you want to survive out there.

Because, honestly, without a smartphone, what are you supposed to do with the three minutes to spare before class starts? Talk to classmates or look over your notes? That’s funny: We didn’t realize people still did those things. And is there anything more annoying that dragging yourself to a local cafe, ready to crank out a paper, only to look up at that spiteful battery symbol on your laptop and realize that you have 15 percent battery life remaining without a charger in sight?

Our dependence on technology also produces some interesting predatory behavior when it comes to protecting our tech-turf. Power outlets have become valuable resources that must be fought for and defended, and Wi-Fi passwords are about as precious as nuclear launch codes.

Although we hadn’t really thought about incorporating cords into our bodies quite yet, we’re starting to feel like that actually would be really convenient. It sure would make our backpacks a little lighter.

Contact Corinne Platten at [email protected]