2 UC Berkeley professors elected to National Academy of Engineering

The National Academy of Engineering elected two UC Berkeley professors to its membership Thursday.

Professors Jonathan Bray, the faculty chair in earthquake engineering excellence, and Clayton Radke, a professor of chemical and biomolecular engineering, were among 67 new members and 12 foreign members who will be inducted later this year.

Bray and Radke were named to the academy, a prestigious professional recognition, for contributions to engineering research, education and literature in their respective fields.

Radke was selected for his demonstrated “understanding of mixed-wettability and foam-enhanced oil recovery through thin film and pore-scale models,” according to a statement released by the National Academy of Engineering, or NAE. Bray was chosen for his “contributions to earthquake engineering and advances in mitigation of surface faulting, liquefaction and seismic slope failure.”

brayThe NAE is a private, nonprofit organization that, along with other groups such as the National Academy of Sciences, is collectively known as the National Academies. The academies also include the Institute of Medicine and the National Research Council.

The academy, which was founded in 1964, provides expertise on projects involving the relationship among engineering, technology and quality of life.

Members of the group are often called on to conduct research or to serve as expert advisers to the government in various scientific fields, according to Randy Atkins, a spokesperson for the NAE.

Bray and Radke join dozens of other UC Berkeley faculty in the academy, which comprises more than 2,000 peer-elected and foreign members. Academy members include Shankar Sastry, the dean of the campus College of Engineering, and Paul Wright, a chair in the campus department of mechanical engineering.

“Our members tend to have their fingers on the pulse of what’s going on in their fields,” Atkins said. “The nomination review process is pretty rigorous, and as a result, only a small fraction of people who are nominated get elected.”

Bray, who has authored more than 300 research publications, specializes in earthquake engineering and environmental geotechnics. He is also a fellow with the American Society of Civil Engineers.

Radke’s research focuses on surface and colloid science technology. He has received dozens of other awards and honors, including the American Chemical Society National Award in Colloid Chemistry.

Both Bray and Radke attended UC Berkeley for graduate school, receiving doctorates in geotechnical engineering and chemical engineering, respectively.

The NAE will host its induction in October in Washington, D.C.

Chloee Weiner is a news editor. Contact her at [email protected] and follow her on Twitter @_chloeew .