BERKELEY'S NEWS • OCTOBER 01, 2022

People's Park tree removal scheduled for week of spring break

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MARCH 20, 2015

Some trees in the university-owned People’s Park are scheduled to be removed, braced or thinned during spring break, according to the campus.

A report commissioned for the University of California by HortScience Inc., an environmental consulting firm, ranked each tree’s condition on a five-point scale. According to Christine Shaff, director of communications for the campus real estate division, the exact number of trees to be cut down has not yet been decided, but the campus will mainly focus on trees designated “2” on the scale.

Thirty-four trees were given a “2” rating in the report, but according to the report’s conclusion, 77 trees should be cleared from the park, and 76 should be preserved. Trees marked for removal may be diseased or otherwise undesirable, the report said.

“It’s really about safety and taking care of trees (that are) potentially hazardous,” Shaff said. “It’s work that needs to be done.”

The work is planned for the week of UC Berkeley’s spring break, when the campus and surrounding area are typically quieter, she said. She added that other renovations, such as concrete demolition near Zellerbach Hall, as part of the construction work of the Lower Sproul Redevelopment program, are also planned for the break.

Contact G. Haley Massara at 

LAST UPDATED

MARCH 21, 2015


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