Forgotten presidents reincarnated as hidden UC Berkeley spots

Ariel Hayat/Senior Staff

Washington, Lincoln, Kennedy, Bush, Obama. Who else comes to mind when you think of presidents? Definitely not these ancient souls that have slipped everyone’s minds. In due respect to Presidents’ Day, we at the Clog have decided to jog your memory of some of our forgotten leaders of the past in the form of neglected spots on the UC Berkeley campus.

Rutherford B. Hayes

Battered like the Howison Philosophy Library, Hayes was a dutiful American who served and survived the Civil War. Although he barely won the presidency by one vote, Hayes still fulfilled his duty and promises of a one term presidency. Likewise, if you’re looking for a place to study and hide away from your classmates and friends, Howison Library is the place to be, that is, if you can find it hidden behind the trees across from Barrows Hall.

Omil Xia/File

Omil Xia/File

James Garfield

At the peak of his life, four months into his presidency, Garfield was assassinated. Historians claimed that he would have become a great president because of his integrity and his character (he was a preacher pre-presidency), but now we’ll never know. He is the Student Learning Center, a place filled with so much potential, yet once the ASUC Student Union opened, it was kicked out of its rightful place. The upside is, there’s never a struggle to find a seat at the beloved SLC anymore.

Ariel Hayat/File

Ariel Hayat/File

Chester Arthur

Hurrying in to fulfill Garfield’s place, Arthur stood at a height of six feet, always dressed fashionably and was known to be a gentleman. Arthur is Garbarini Lounge, one that is always clean, fresh and ready to impress. Located within the Bechtel Engineering Center, this lounge allows you to study easily and fall asleep comfortably, which suits Arthur perfectly, as he loved to stay up late into the night.

Michael Ball/File

Michael Ball/File

Grover Cleveland

Even though he won the presidency twice during two nonconsecutive terms, Cleveland’s legacy still easily slips the minds of us students. He is the South Hall. Weighing in at 250 lbs, his presence, like this building, is definitely not to be missed. This prominent four story building is one that most students on Southside pass on their way to class. Heck, you probably pass it every day but don’t even know its name.

File

File

Benjamin Harrison

Probably one of the least known presidents, Benjamin Harrison was one of the only presidents to have an abundant supply of money in the Treasury during his term. He is Common Grounds, which also happens to be the least known Cal dining area, located in Dwinelle Hall. Similar to how the Harrison name has been tied to the White House, Common Grounds serves the popular Peet’s Coffee, which belongs to a significant chain found throughout various locations on campus.

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Michael Kang/File