BERKELEY'S NEWS • OCTOBER 02, 2022

Cal track and field set to send 3 competitors at NCAA Indoor Championships

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ETHAN EPSTEIN | FILE

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MARCH 09, 2016

This weekend, sophomores Bethan Knights, Peter Simon and Isabella Marten will be competing in the NCAA Indoor Championships in Birmingham, Alabama. They all qualified by ranking among the top 16 athletes in their respective events in the country.

Knights will be running the 3,000-meter run. She qualified at the MPSF Championships by placing second in the event with a time of 9:08.77.

“(Seeding) is based upon their seed mark from the athletes’ seasons’ best. In events that have a qualifying procedure, they usually have two heats and they try to balance them from one of the other, so there’s an equal opportunity for people to qualify for the final,” said Cal track and field director Tony Sandoval. “In final, only events like the 3,000 lane assignments are randomly assigned.”

Simon also qualified for NCAAs at MPSF two weeks ago in men’s shot put. He threw for a distance of 19.09 meters, breaking a school record. His distance is 15th amongst qualifiers.  The top nine finishers in the event will move on to a reverse-order final right after the first flight.

Aside from a few outliers that have thrown farther than 20 meters in men’s shot put, all of the athletes in the event are clustered around the same distance as Simon, which means he could place higher than his seeding.

Marten had qualified for women’s triple jump at the NCAAs even before MPSF. She set a mark of 13.26-meters.  Marten’s event will have the same format as men’s shot put, with Marten’s seed mark falling right around the middle of the pack.

All three of them will be competing for the first time Saturday, the second day of the meet.

Overall, the competition at the NCAAs is the toughest in the nation, but the Bears should be optimistic considering the fact that all of their seed marks are consistently competitive, which means only one second or one centimeter could separate them from first or last place.

“I think this is what everybody works for, to get an opportunity to compete at the big show,” Sandoval said. “Anything can happen there, so we don’t get in with all sorts of limited thinking.”

Contact Lucy Schaefer at 

LAST UPDATED

MARCH 09, 2016


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