Peach and blueberry pie

Sasha Ashall/Staff

This isn’t an easy recipe. This will take you hours and you’ll learn a few new techniques. But we at the Clog think that summer is the time for experimenting in the kitchen and utilizing seasonal ingredients for more complicated recipes because we have the time. Leave the pot noodle and pasta with red sauce for the school year and embark on a culinary journey that’ll leave a crunch and sugary, bright sweetness in your mouth.

Peach pie is a summer staple in the South and Midwest. We added blueberries to the filling for their vibrant color and slight tartness and lemon zest to the pie crust for a unique zing.

Get ready because this recipe has a million complicated steps. Here we go.

What you’ll need:

Crust:

2 1/2 cups of all purpose flour

2 tbs sugar

2 sticks of salted or unsalted butter

1 tsp salt (only if using unsalted butter)

1/4-1/2 cup ice cold water

zest of half a lemon

1 egg beaten for egg wash

Filling:

5-6 medium-sized, just-ripe peaches

1 pint of blueberries

1-2 tbs sugar

1/2 tsp cinnamon

juice of half a lemon

1-2 tbs of flour

Equipment:

pie pan

rolling pin or wine bottle

zester/small hole grater

pastry blender (optional)

silicon rolling mat (optional)

What you’ll do:

Let’s start with the crust. One might say this is a controversial crust for two reasons. Firstly, much to the chagrin of everyone’s Southern grandmothers, who would have you use lard or a combination, this is an all-butter pie crust. Lard gives the flakiness we all know and love, while butter provides the rich flavor necessary — the rationale behind a combination crust is that you need both elements for perfection. However, with the right amount of patience and time, an all-butter crust can achieve the same flakiness as a lard crust.

Secondly, we chose to use salted butter for our crust with no added salt. Many bakers would have you believe that salted butter can never be used in baking because you can’t control the amount of salt. However, salted butter is one of the most amazing, delicious inventions in the world and can definitely be used in baking as long as you omit any added salt and taste things as you go.

So let’s begin.

Add all of your dry ingredients (flour, sugar, lemon zest and salt, if using) to a large mixing bowl and mix quickly with a spoon or knife. Cut your very cold butter into small cubes (you could even freeze the butter beforehand so it’s really cold). Using either your fingers or a pastry blender, rub the butter into the flour until it resembles coarse sand, but there are still larger pieces of butter the size of peas.

Coarse crumbs

Sasha Ashall/Staff

It’s important that there are larger pieces of butter so that you’ll have a flaky crust. In the oven, the pieces of butter melt and create pockets of air, which is what makes it flaky and airy.

Now add 1/4 cup of ice water and use a knife to mix it in. Using your hands press and fold the dough mixture until it forms a ball. You’ll probably need to add more water, but be sparing and try to resist adding more unless you really need to.

When your dough has formed a ball, wrap it in plastic wrap and refrigerate for at least an hour — we refrigerated overnight. This is very important to keep the butter solid.

Sasha Ashall/Staff

Sasha Ashall/Staff

While the dough is in the fridge, let’s make the filling.

For the filling, we’ve got to tackle the peaches first. To prepare the peaches cut a line along the stone then twist to separate the two halves. Remove the stone. If your peaches are ripe, you’ll be able to very easily peel the skin off. After removing the skin, cut each half into three or four slices.

After you finish with the peaches, crack open a beer and chill for a bit because it was grueling and messy.

Put the peaches and blueberries into a bowl and add all the other ingredients — lemon juice, sugar, cinnamon and flour — and mix with a spoon. Place in the fridge until you need it later on.

Sasha Ashall/Staff

Sasha Ashall/Staff

Once you take the dough out of the fridge, this would be the moment to preheat your oven to 425 degrees.

Cut your dough ball into two pieces, roughly 1/3 and 2/3. Place the smaller piece in the fridge.

Sasha Ashall/Staff

Sasha Ashall/Staff

Flour your surface (this is a great time to use that silicon mat if you have one) and roll out your dough until it’s as thin as you can get it without breaking. This could take up to 10 minutes, so be patient and keep rolling. It should be just over a foot in diameter.

Sasha Ashall/Staff

Sasha Ashall/Staff

Roll your dough over the rolling pin (or wine bottle) and transfer to your pie dish.

Sasha Ashall/Staff

Sasha Ashall/Staff

Using your fingertips, shift the dough until the overhang is about the same all the way around and push the dough into the corners of the dish. Crimp the edges to your liking.

Sasha Ashall/Staff

Sasha Ashall/Staff

Tip the peach and blueberry filling into the lower crust, place it in the fridge and take out the other piece of dough.

Reflour your surface and roll the dough out into a fairly symmetrical circle so that you can cut it for your lattice. When the dough is just under a foot in diameter and quite thin, cut it into strips about 3/4 of an inch wide.

Sasha Ashall/Staff

Sasha Ashall/Staff

Take every other strip and lay them across the filling.

Sasha Ashall/Staff

Sasha Ashall/Staff

Now fold back every other strip on the pie and place a strip across that.

Sasha Ashall/Staff

Sasha Ashall/Staff

Fold those strips back over and repeat this process until you’ve placed all the strips.

Sasha Ashall/Staff

Sasha Ashall/Staff

Sasha Ashall/Staff

Sasha Ashall/Staff

Recrimp the edges and brush the whole crust with egg wash (we just used our fingers). Place it in the fridge for 30 minutes.

Sasha Ashall/Staff

Sasha Ashall/Staff

After 30 minutes, put the pie in the oven at 425 degrees for 20 minutes and the crust will start to brown and look crispy. Then turn the temperature down to 375 degrees and bake for another 35-40 minutes until the crust is golden brown and the filling is bubbly and caramelized.

Finished Pie

Sasha Ashall/Staff

Let the pie cool for at least 30 minutes, ideally an hour — you must resist the urge to cut into it while it’s hot so that the juices can thicken and the crust can set.

Enjoy!

Sasha Ashall is the blog editor. Contact Sasha Ashall at [email protected].