The Tang Center is a hoax

Rachael Garner/File

“Wow! My visit to the Tang Center today was so beneficial and quick!” said nobody ever. It’s with a heavy heart that we renounce the campus’s health services center.

We acknowledge that the Tang Center is probably doing the best it can. There’s no way it’s easy to manage the health of tens of thousands of college students who haven’t eaten a vegetable in more than a month. Furthermore, health care stuff is heavily stationed in the category of “adult business,” which means that we don’t want to have anything to do with it. Other key components of this category include managing our internet provider and tax return forms. Regardless of how much we dread dealing with these things, the fact that the Tang Center seems to strive to make health care complicated really steams our broccoli.

The wait at the Tang Center puts the Crossroads bunch omelette line to shame. The odds of one being treated for their health affliction are lower than odds of us dying of old age. They say time heals all wounds, and Tang Center is really putting that to the test. In the event that someone actually is experiencing a serious health crisis, it would be better to hit up WebMD than wait for four hours in the Tang waiting room. 

Yet another beef we have with the management of the alleged health services we are provided is the obscene amount of paperwork involved. UC Berkeley is all about zero waste by 2020, yet the Tang Center uses more paper than every English R1B class on campus combined. There’s really no need for so much paperwork if all we’re looking for are simple solutions. Why would anyone need to know our great aunt’s brother’s coworker’s blood type just to prescribe us some cough medicine? You could go into the Tang Center for a bandage and have to tell them your entire medical history before they send you to Walgreens to buy some Band-Aids yourself.

Not to mention the fact that there seems to be a need for a minimum of four appointments for every health affliction we face. You need an appointment for an assessment and another for a consultation and another for a referral and probably one more just for kicks. We appreciate how involved the staff wants to be in our day-to-day lives, but can’t help but wonder why the 12 hours of waiting and four appointments we underwent last week couldn’t be streamlined into one day. Forget about spending a copious amount of time in Moffitt Library, we’re taking up residence in the Tang Center from now on. 

We understand that health care is something that not everyone has access to. We just hope to gain a better understanding of why the thousands of dollars we hand over for University Health Services results in such a struggle. We would head to the Tang Center and ask them ourselves, but that would entail a hefty wait time. And we’ve got important plans six hours from now that we don’t want to miss. 

Contact Amanda Chung at [email protected].