daily californian logo

BERKELEY'S NEWS • FEBRUARY 01, 2023

Ring in the New Year with our 2023 New Year's Special Issue!

Rolling Loud 2018: Playboi Carti

article image

ASLESHA KUMAR | STAFF

SUPPORT OUR NONPROFIT NEWSROOM

We're an independent student-run newspaper, and need your support to maintain our coverage.

SEPTEMBER 20, 2018

The video for Playboi Carti’s “R.I.P.” is amazingly shot — a black and white depiction of what a concert and live performance by the rapper ought to be gliding across the screen. Every component to what makes a successful hip-hop show is present in the video’s three-minute runtime: an explosive song, its author actually wanting to be at the show and a crowd that is totally invested in the music.

Unfortunately, Playboi Carti’s Rolling Loud set Saturday hit none of these marks. The most excited the crowd ever got was before the show when the DJ played A$AP Rocky and Skepta’s song “Praise the Lord.”

Playboi Carti came out in a red-and-white striped shirt, jumping and dancing and ad-libbing to his heart’s desire on each song. Although he himself brought the energy needed to make for a good show, the crowd was simply not into it.

During songs such as “R.I.P. Fredo (Notice Me)” and “FlatBed Freestyle,” the thousands-deep audience barely attempted to match Playboi Carti’s energy to the point where he himself stopped trying to hype up the crowd. Every single song off of Die Lit can be moshed to — instead of the crowd following suit, it just refused to react to Playboi Carti and his DJ shouting “Open that shit up! Open that mosh pit up!” for what felt like hours on end.

The crowd was so packed-in that the mosh pit was unfeasible. This did not faze Playboi Carti’s desire to open up a mosh pit during his set. The DJ’s wailing sirens accompanied by his annoying voice only exacerbated the awful crowd and Playboi Carti’s evidently dwindling care for his set. When he finally played “R.I.P.” toward the end of his set, the crowd reacted wholeheartedly for the first time; this being the penultimate song, though, it was too late to save the set.

Justin Sidhu covers music. Contact him at [email protected].
LAST UPDATED

SEPTEMBER 20, 2018


Related Articles

featured article
Rolling Loud is new to the Bay Area and even newer to Oakland — for its second stint in Northern California, Rolling Loud was held at the Oakland-Alameda County Coliseum grounds, cementing its status not only as a celebration of rap and hip-hop but also specifically of Bay Area rap and hip-hop.
Rolling Loud is new to the Bay Area and even newer to Oakland — for its second stint in Northern California, Rolling Loud was held at the Oakland-Alameda County Coliseum grounds, cementing its status not only as a celebration of rap and hip-hop but also specifically of Bay Area rap and hip-hop.
featured article
featured article
The inspiration for curating a hip-hop focused festival was sparked by Cherif’s acknowledgement of a void of hip-hop shows or festivals in comparison to a multitude of multigenre festivals.
The inspiration for curating a hip-hop focused festival was sparked by Cherif’s acknowledgement of a void of hip-hop shows or festivals in comparison to a multitude of multigenre festivals.
featured article
featured article
A collective voice quickly emerged from the pit alongside Rachmany’s, and as the audience members put their hands up and swayed to the syncopated reggae rhythm, it was clear that Rebelution’s sold-out show would be a good time.
A collective voice quickly emerged from the pit alongside Rachmany’s, and as the audience members put their hands up and swayed to the syncopated reggae rhythm, it was clear that Rebelution’s sold-out show would be a good time.
featured article