Places to worship different faiths and beliefs in Berkeley

Jenn Zeng/Senior Staff

Updated 5/6/19: This article has been updated to include additional information about Jewish spaces of worship and to clarify the intent of the article.

Berkeley has always been a place of religious freedom. The community is encouraged to explore and appreciate the diversity of religions and, most importantly, to respect one another’s faith and beliefs. With Berkeley being a hub for all groups of people, the city of Berkeley also offers all types of resources to support people of many religions. Here are only a few of the many places of worship Berkeley has to offer.

Berkeley Fellowship of Unitarian Universalists

The Berkeley Fellowship of Unitarian Universalists, or BFUU, is located in North Berkeley at 1924 Cedar St. BFUU describes itself as “a progressive spiritual community that stands proudly as a beacon for social justice.” BFUU has an hourlong Sunday service starting at 10:30 a.m. Its services are led by ministers and lay leaders who are sometimes accompanied by other speakers. Along with this, BFUU has many upcoming and ongoing events that one can get involved with, including an elders circle, choir practice, and qi gong and tai chi.

Berkeley Tribe Church

The Berkeley Tribe Church is a nondenominational Christian church that is located at 2509 Hillegass Ave., right across the street from People’s Park. Sunday services begin at 11 a.m., and the church offers a livestream for those who cannot make the Sunday worship service. This church also offers programs for children, and its community is mainly made up of UC Berkeley alumni along with UC Berkeley staff. Berkeley Tribe describes its worship service as “a simple, modern service, with worship led by a band that you can sing along to, and a short sermon in-between.”

Berkeley Masjid

Berkeley Masjid is located at 2716 Derby St. and is open to all Muslims and non-Muslims who would like to learn more about Islam. This mosque provides Friday prayer, and its current prayer times can be found on its website. The Berkeley Masjid Foundation also offers many other events and services to bring the Muslim community together.

Berkeley Buddhist Temple

The Berkeley Buddhist Temple is located at 2121 Channing Way with Sunday services beginning at 9:30 a.m. The temple also offers sessions that focus mainly on Buddhist teaching and practice. Each session also touches on different topics every time! The temple offers different events, the next one being its 70th annual Satsuki Bazaar taking place May 18-19.

Newman Hall-Holy Spirit Parish

Newman Hall-Holy Spirit Parish is located on the corner of Dwight Way and College Avenue at 2700 Dwight Way. It provides daily mass Monday through Saturday at 12:10 p.m. and Sunday mass at 7:30 a.m., 10 a.m., 5 p.m. and 10 p.m. Newman also offers student-based programs and events for Catholic UC Berkeley students.

Congregation Netivot Shalom

Congregation Netivot Shalom is a Jewish synagogue located at 1316 University Ave., about 20 minutes away from campus by public transportation. The congregants include people of Jewish descent, Jewish-practicing individuals by choice and families of mixed faith. While it welcomes a diverse group of attendees, Netivot Shalom is devoted to its college-aged visitors and members: “a vibrant, active, and diverse young adults community.” On most second Fridays, Netivot Shalom’s Young Adults Havurah hosts a community meal, and the synagogue has regular Saturday morning services.

Although these places of worship only touch upon some of the faiths and beliefs present in our Berkeley community, there are still many more religions to acknowledge and appreciate. This is not a comprehensive list of places of worship, so make sure to reference additional sources for more information.

Joyce Cam is the assistant blog editor. Contact Joyce Cam at [email protected].

Correction(s):
A previous version of this article’s infographic incorrectly referred to Berkeley Masjid and the Berkeley Fellowship of Unitarian Universalists as Masjid Al-Iman and the Unitarian Universalist Church of Berkeley, respectively.