New year resolutions for UC Berkeley students

Paolo Paz/Staff

Regardless of how you spent your New Year’s Eve, whether it was at a countdown party or at home with family, everyone knows an inevitable part of ushering in the new year and new decade is the long-held tradition of making New Year’s resolutions. Alas, from exercising more to sleeping more, these are the changes everyone would really like to accomplish, but never really get around to doing. In particular, there are a few resolutions that are must-haves for UC Berkeley students to ensure a year of highs rather than lows. Here is a list of the Daily Cal’s UC Berkeley-specific New Year’s resolutions.

Read more news

Ever gone to a job interview and been embarrassed over your lack of substantive knowledge on current events? The solution is simple: consume more news. In the rapidly changing 21st century, staying informed on prominent issues is more important than ever. UC Berkeley offers a variety of ways to stay up to date with the news sphere. For example, The Daily Californian, which you’re reading right now, offers free daily copies at several places around campus, written by students for all members of the community. The ASUC also recently secured partnerships with The New York Times and the Wall Street Journal for free online subscriptions for all students, enabling you to stay connected with the touch of a button. While this may sound biased coming from a journalist, in the long run, I promise this resolution will lead to greater perspective and knowledge. 

Climb the Fire Trails or hike to the Big C

Want to cut down on that freshman 15 or just have a healthier lifestyle? Tucked behind Berkeley’s many hills, there are a few beautiful hiking trails perfect for your weekly workout. For example, the Fire Trails, up behind the Clark Kerr Campus, lead hikers up a grueling incline before revealing one of the greatest views of the San Francisco skyline in all of Berkeley. It’s beautiful at all times of day, but especially at golden hour, when you can get all sorts of aesthetically pleasing photos. Another option is to hike to the Big C, a literal large yellow “C” on top of a hill. The hike is much shorter and friendlier for beginners, with a similarly scenic view at the top. It’s accessed through the Foothill parking lot. Overall, hiking in Berkeley can be a great alternative to waiting in line for the weight room at the Recreational Sports Facility, especially when it is relatively accessible. 

Study anywhere but Moffitt and Main Stacks

Whenever finals season rolls around, a large part of UC Berkeley student culture is holing ourselves up in the largest libraries and staying there like moles for implausibly long hours to study. Last semester, there was even a section of Moffitt designated for crying to prevent disturbing the other students. This inevitably does not bode well for student well-being, so this semester, I challenge you to study in different places. For instance, there are several smaller and less-crowded libraries all over campus, such as C.V. Starr East Asian Library, which has tons of natural light, and the Environmental Design Library, which always has spare seats. Cafés near campus, such as Cafe Blue Door and Peet’s Coffee, offer Wi-Fi, comfortable background noise and the smell of warm coffee wafting by during the day. There are even churches nearby that have desks, power outlets, free Wi-Fi and snacks during exam seasons just for students. In sum, there are so many other places to study and concentrate, and that have much better atmospheres than the usual few places.

Try all the boba places in Berkeley

Our two favorite b-words: Berkeley and boba! While some people are going on boba cleanses, I believe that we should take advantage of this time of endless boba innovation and renewal, and instead try all the boba. There are about 19 boba places in Berkeley and only about four that people actually go to. In the spirit of the new year and trying new things at least once, mapping the landscape of boba in Berkeley is a daunting task that requires a worthy taster like you.

Explore San Francisco and Emeryville

While this may seem like common sense, the amount of people who actually explore our neighboring cities to the full extent is surprisingly few. Hopping on the BART or the bus for a day can lead you to a day of fun and unique experiences in Chinatown, at museums and at other historical sites. The chubby seals at Pier 39 are worth a visit at least once, as are the seafood restaurants at Fisherman’s Wharf. And if tourist sites are too overrun, there are several more indie shops and music shows around the cities that are worth a look. 

Contact Angelina Wang at [email protected].