BERKELEY'S NEWS • SEPTEMBER 26, 2022

Don't sleep on this tip for getting your sleep schedule back on track

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KATIE LEE | STAFF

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NOVEMBER 03, 2020

I furiously tossed and turned in bed, mysteriously unable to sleep. I checked my phone. 1 a.m.! I had been lying in bed since 11 p.m., desperately trying to get in a handsome amount of sleep before class the next day. 

I began to notice this incredibly annoying trend of being unable to fall asleep whenever I slept too much the night before. Two weeks after my summer class ended, with zero alarms to keep me in check, I noticed that while I certainly did sleep a lot every night (more than 10 hours), I struggled to fall asleep at a consistent time. My bedtime would start at a healthy 10 p.m., but within five days, I would be tossing and turning until 3 a.m.

This was rather suspicious. Why did my body allow itself to oversleep if it meant I couldn’t fall asleep properly the next day? I needed answers, so I began to poke around. 

Upon a quick Google search, I learned that the human body actually runs more accurately on a 25-hour clock. As the Harvard Gazette reports, “this situation is blamed for a long list of sleep problems,” which makes sense — I experienced that sleeping naturally (without an alarm) does shift your sleeping window back in the day, bit by bit. This left me with two options. This first was to move to Mars, where one day is 24.5 hours long. This would align more closely with my biological clock. The second was to set alarms, even when I have the time to sleep in, to ensure that I don’t sleep for too long. I chose the second option because moving to Mars would be social distancing on steroids, and I decided I’d had enough of that in my lifetime.

Maybe you’re taking a lot of classes with asynchronous lectures right now, and despite starting the semester off strong by watching them on time, you’re finding yourself waking up later and later every day. Now you know why! So before you completely give up and stop setting an alarm altogether, consider your body’s biological workings and use this information to get yourself back on track. And the next time you have a week of vacation during which you don’t have to set alarms, keep in mind that your sleep schedule isn’t going to look so hot for the next few days.

Contact Kristel Fung at 

LAST UPDATED

NOVEMBER 03, 2020


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