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5 houseplants that a college student's busy schedule can't kill

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NATALIA BRUSCO | STAFF

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OCTOBER 24, 2021

Incorporating plants into your room decor can brighten up any type of space. Adding lush greens to every void or empty corner transforms boring spots into something Instagram-worthy. However, the challenge is all the care and maintenance these plants need on top of a busy college schedule. To help with this dilemma, here are five low-maintenance houseplants that are harder to kill than to keep alive. 

Snake Plant 

At this point, the snake plant is probably on every “beginner-friendly plants” list, and for good reason: Its tall dark leaves elevate almost all interior decoration styles. These plants are able to thrive in almost any condition and only require watering when the soil is dry to the touch. Their height range is pretty wide, so smaller kinds (6 inches) can go on the shelf, while bigger varieties (up to 8 feet) can add a nice touch to those empty room corners. 

Anthurium 

Known for its heart-shaped blooms (which are actually modified leaves), the anthurium is perfect as a centerpiece for your dining or coffee tables. It requires watering every one to two weeks and prefers bright indirect light to keep their green leaves vibrant. Anthuriums are usually famous for their bright red variety, but they also come in pink hues and white for a softer look. 

Philodendron 

The philodendron is yet another beginner-friendly classic. While they come in many types, one of the most popular is the heartleaf philodendron. Its green heart-shaped leaves are perfect when the plant is hung or when its long stems are trained to wrap around shelves. Too much sunlight will scorch its leaves and turn them yellow, so just like with the anthurium, keep them in bright indirect light. Allow the soil to dry out in between waterings. 

English Ivy

Like the philodendron, the English ivy is a great plant to hang or wrap around cabinets or shelves. However, unlike the philodendron, you don’t need to worry about scorching its leaves as this plant loves bright or indirect light and will probably grow best near windows. Make sure the soil is dry to the touch before watering again as overwatering will kill the ivy. 

ZZ Plant

The ZZ plant’s name conveniently says it all: It thrives best if you let it sleep and leave it alone. It can withstand all kinds of extreme conditions, from infrequent watering to changing humidity. While it does thrive in medium to bright indirect light, it can gladly tolerate low-light environments too, so feel free to put it in the bathroom or kitchen. Its spiky leaves have definitely become a Pinterest-famous decor staple. 

From overwatering to sunlight exposure, keeping plants alive can certainly turn something peaceful into something stressful. While there are many other low-maintenance and beginner-friendly houseplants, these five suggestions are a good place to start cultivating your mini home jungle.

Contact Samantha Centeno at [email protected].
LAST UPDATED

OCTOBER 24, 2021


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