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Hyperpop sensation Dorian Electra talks furry armies, touring

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FEBRUARY 15, 2022

“I really didn’t even get into memes until 2020, honestly,” Dorian Electra admitted in their interview with The Daily Californian. 

A shocking confession, to say the least, as Electra’s most recent record My Agenda is seeping with meme references. From their Christian girl autumn-inspired music video for “F the World” to the satiric embracement of Alex Jones’ infamous frog water conspiracy in the album’s title track, Electra heavily invokes popular and meme culture in their thought-provoking, undeniably humorous work. 

“It was a very online period of time, especially in 2020 and 2021,” Electra reminisced while discussing the roots of their most recent album. “So many of our political and identity narratives about who we are in the world that we live in are really weaved by memes. They’re a form of collective storytelling and I think memes are really important to look at and participate in.” 

Strictly following this ethos throughout the creation of My Agenda, Electra not only proved their own pop culture know-how but also imprinted their artistic stamp onto the world of experimental pop music. Electra is known equally for their over-the-top videos and visuals as for their actual music, creating both awe-inspiring bops and genius-level aesthetic visions.

“Oftentimes I think about music in terms of visuals,” Electra said. “ ‘How would I like to move my body? What color scheme would be associated with this?’ These are just things that kind of naturally come to mind for me when I’m feeling really creatively stimulated and excited about a song.”

Electra’s extensive music video catalog reflects such forethought. When asked what their favorite My Agenda-era music videos were, Electra exalted the eponymous track.

“(It) was definitely like the biggest vision where I was like, ‘oh, this would be just a dream to make this video happen…’ ” Electra said. “I don’t know how we’re going to be able to do this, like a whole furry army.’ It just seemed really out of reach.” 

In the stunning video, the aforementioned furry army is backed by an impressive, Gotham-inspired post-apocalyptic city. The setting features factories mass-producing water bottles filled with a hydrating, homosexuality-inducing liquid (yes, you read that right). 

Similarly grandiose in vision, Electra’s video adaptation for the songs “Gentleman” and “M’Lady” feature fedora-wearing incels, a mountain-dew club and incredibly detailed animation. Such visions would be near-impossible to complete on even the highest budget, however, Electra is able to perfectly do so within their own living room. 

“If you can… move the furniture around and fit a green screen somewhere, that opens up a lot of possibilities,” Electra explained.

Not only green screen reliant, however, Electra also noted the immersive process of creating the “Gentleman/M’Lady” video. “We started gradually collecting trash in this room at our house so that I could film the scenes in there,” they said. “I was really living that life for a while, and really getting into it in a personal way.” 

Noting their preference for such a DIY work ethic, Electra confessed that many of their videos are produced solely by them and their roommates. Electra treasures the nostalgia of such work and the ability to balance efficiency and playful excitement. 

“I was really getting in touch with my high school roots of just screwing around with my friends, making funny videos, you know?” they recalled.

The highlights of the My Agenda World Tour similarly brought Electra back to their childhood. Resonating with audiences far and wide, Electra’s fanbase has waited nearly two years to see them live, and many younger fans have told the artist that Electra’s show was their first concert ever.

“I remember what that was like when I was in high school,” Electra beamed. “I will never forget those moments.”

While discussing the differences between their current and previous tours, Electra cited scale and the artistic freedom it enables. “​​We have a lot more production. We have a lighting designer that’s traveling with us, we have more props and more choreo,” they said. “I feel like I’m really able to –– even with a small, independent budget –– realize my creative vision on stage.”

Tour, however, is just the beginning. Electra’s search for invention and innovation drives their artistry, and they hinted at spending time doing research and reading in preparation for their next album. 

“Trying to… add something new to the conversation is what motivates me,” they concluded.

Although audiences may not precisely know what to expect from Electra in the coming years, such uncertainty is exactly what makes them such an intriguing musician. Electra holds a promising, ever-evolving carousel of artistic visions, and audiences would be amiss to not board such a captivating ride. 

Ian Fredrickson covers music. Contact him at [email protected].
LAST UPDATED

FEBRUARY 15, 2022


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