BERKELEY'S NEWS • SEPTEMBER 25, 2022

Wet Leg effortlessly runs circles around Bimbo’s 365 Club’s stage

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MATTHEW GIBSON | SENIOR STAFF

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APRIL 06, 2022

On March 29, Wet Leg proved to a sold-out San Francisco audience why the band’s sudden rise should be labeled as anything but unexpected. Adorned with more signet rings than released songs, leads Rhian Teasdale and Hester Chambers skillfully powered music’s most exciting new act through a setlist mostly populated by mesmerizing, unreleased music.

Wet Leg is sitting in the unique position of having a highly passionate fanbase based on what is currently a very small sampling of music. In addition to previewing the group’s highly anticipated debut LP, captivating shows such as these show why fans are so invested in the band.

Throughout its set at San Francisco’s Bimbo’s 365 Club, Wet Leg conveyed the infectious, mischievous joy that continues to propel its rise to mainstream popularity. Synths and drums often led the evening’s charge, primarily during unreleased tracks. The duo opened with two unreleased tracks, “Being in Love” and “Convincing,” before playing their risque, released song “Wet Dream” with nonchalant, yet energized, passion.

Sipping cocktails between songs, the band appeared remarkably relaxed in front of a sold-out audience. This relaxed attitude, however, was not to be mistaken for a lack of enthusiasm. Teasdale and Chambers gleefully ran in circles, performed synchronized twirls and rolled around on the stage throughout their performance. During the as-of-then unreleased “Ur Mum,” Teasdale and her keyboardist let out screams, encouraging the audience to join in.

Wet Leg’s music often feels like banter delivered with a suggestive wink. Teasdale and Chambers exchange lyrics playfully, eyeing one another with bemused looks. They don’t need to prove they’re funny or charming –– the playful wit some artists reserve for onstage banter is already present in Wet Leg’s music.

At one point in the night, Teasdale’s microphone cord disconnected, leading the musician to remark how “there’s really a lot that can go wrong.” Despite this wisdom, considerably little to nothing has gone wrong for the band since its debut track, a song that has since caught the attention of musical icons such as Elton John and Dave Grohl. 

During the riotous closer “Chaise Longue,” one dedicated fan let loose giant “D-shaped balloons,” a reference to the lyric “I went to school and I got the big D.” Teasdale and Chambers’ faces instantly lit up in response, as they laughed and pushed the balloons back into the crowd. The set ended with the band settling down from their own laughter, pointing at the fan who brought the balloons while singing, “Hey you, in the front row, are you coming backstage after the show?”

Wet Leg’s exuberance in San Francisco was infectious, offering a personable, intimate feeling even in the sold-out confines of a moderately large club. The band is enjoying every moment of its rise, and with its exponential growth in popularity, it will likely not take long for Wet Leg to go from playing packed city clubs to auditoriums. Spirited evenings such as these feel precious to audience members, a reward for the early adopters who see potential for the larger-than-life band while also fostering a love for where Wet Leg is now.

The band’s brilliant San Francisco concert showed why Wet Leg is acing every test, already flaunting the confidence of a firmly established act. Just 10 months out from the release of its first single, the band is now a week away from crossing its next hurdle by releasing its debut LP — and Wet Leg hasn’t even broken a sweat.

Contact Ryan McCullough at 

LAST UPDATED

APRIL 05, 2022


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