Zion I of Oakland leads progressive hip-hop gala

The world of hip-hop is becoming more diverse each day. Rappers are exploring new styles and expanding their palette more so than ever before. From collaborations with artists of different genres, to mixing modern sounds with traditional methods, rappers and M.C.s are shattering the borders of rap stereotypes. Sure, there
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TV Land: Pilot season prostitution

As with courting a new relationship or selecting your first prostitute, watching a new television show can be a delicate and tricky business. There’s hopefully less chance of contracting the clap (unless you’re watching “Jersey Shore”), but the risk remains the same. Television is one duplicitous temptress and, come every
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A World Apart

When I entered the office space of Tiffany Shlain at Pier 38, which has the look of a pirate ship refurbished into a tech geek’s dreamland, she was on her iPhone, Bluetooth-in-ear. How apropos of her new documentary “Connected: An Autobiography About Love, Death & Technology,” a rumination on our
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Before the Drop

Berkeley's And Drop! looks to carve a niche in the electronic music landscape.

In the ever-expanding universe of electronic music, local Berkeley band And Drop! finds itself at the forefront of the genre’s rise. With its infinite subgenres, electronic music has flourished in the age of high-powered personal computers and social media. Though primarily characterized as electro-house and dubstep, the group’s approach to
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St. Vincent – Strange Mercy

Strange Mercy is not an instant favorite. But with a little cozying up, St. Vincent’s third album will seduce listeners into a melancholic love affair. With her latest effort, timid-voiced singer-songwriter Annie Clark offers another dose of mildly catchy melodies laced with ear-perking beats and sensual guitar riffs. Clark’s vocals
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Of Time and the City

In the wake of the September 11 attacks, New York City filmmakers Martin Scorsese and Spike Lee crafted vivid tributes to a wounded metropolis.

Fifteen months after the destruction of the World Trade Center on September 11, 2001, New York City was reborn in glorious fashion on celluloid. It took a pair of feature films from two of the city’s most influential filmmakers to do it. The first, Queens native Martin Scorsese’s “Gangs of
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Novels reflected on ‘Incredibly Close’ disaster

In literary terms, September 11 no doubt reshaped the way we consider the trauma narrative. The turn-of-the-century tragedy, and the millennium itself, announced not just the boom of postmodernism, but also a question to be answered: Where do we go from here? Jonathan Safran Foer’s exuberant, wildly stylized novel “Extremely
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