Culture of compromise dead in D.C.

Once one of the framers of the U.S. constitution was asked, “What are the three principles upon which this new government is founded?” Legend has it that he wryly quipped, “Well, the first is compromise, the second is compromise and the third is compromise.” Although you would not know it
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Athletic academics

HIGHER EDUCATION: NCAA academic regulations must strike a balance between individual accountability and team responsibility.

The term “student-athlete” implies dual responsibilities: the individual is committed to both education and athletic prowess. At the university level, it is imperative that the former not be sacrificed for the latter. According to NCAA figures, UC Berkeley had an impressive 81 percent graduation success rate for student-athletes as of
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Affordable access

HIGHER EDUCATION: Online access fees should not be passed on to students at community colleges to protect openness and access.

Accessibility and affordability are essential for public education to fulfill its purpose of creating a better functioning society. Community colleges in California remain the most open forms of higher education in the state’s three-tiered public system, and the state should work to preserve that accessibility. Budget cuts have been detrimental
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Getting past the mechanics

Sex on Monday

The specific mechanics of oral sex really shouldn’t be pondered too long. Like most of sex, the longer it is examined with an unhormonal eye, the more horrifying the entire process gets. Like a word repeated until it seems more like noise than something with actual meaning, when looked at
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Dotted Lines

The Way I See It

Annual trips to Korea in my childhood gave me glimpses into the crowded streets of Seoul, where morning and night blend together and life thrives incessantly on the main streets of the city. I’ve seen the red tents that pop up in the early evening and stay up late into
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Students must be properly represented

Berkeley is one of the most distinguished, progressive and diverse communities in the world. This is a legacy of which we residents are very proud: Not only is our city home to what is arguably the best public university in the world, we have a defining history of diversity, activism
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Free-stylin’ projections

Connect the Dots

Wearing sweats in public makes me think of sleepwalking. Besides the handful of times I’ve made it to the RSF, I save wearing my shapeless cotton pants for sleeping days and ones that don’t entail too much sweating. It’s not that I think sweats look (too) gross or hopeless —
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Sticking by your friends

Sex on Monday

Casual can be a tricky word to define in the context of relationships. It means not serious, that’s always clear, but what exactly “not serious” is less certain. Some people think of casual as “we are sleeping together and I can sleep with other people,” while others are more of
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Store of plenty

CITY AFFAIRS: The expansion of Safeway on College avenue is a net positive for students, residents and the city of Oakland.

The proposed expansion of the Safeway at the intersection of College and Claremont avenues has a passionate base of support and an equally passionate opposition. Though opponents raise valid concerns, the specific details of the expansion show that the benefits outweigh the costs to the neighborhood and city. One of
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Bitter compromise

HIGHER EDUCATION: The preservation of the federally funded Pell Grant is welcomed, but the cost was high for graduate students.

There were no clear winners in the federal debt ceiling deal reached last Tuesday. Everything was on the table for cuts — including education. National legislators eliminated the interest subsidy for a government-subsidized loan program for graduate and professional students. But in a bittersweet compromise, the cut allowed the maximum
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