BERKELEY'S NEWS • SEPTEMBER 26, 2022

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help

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If there’s anything this pandemic has taught us, it is that we are stronger when we are kind and stand together to support one another.
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If there’s anything this pandemic has taught us, it is that we are stronger when we are kind and stand together to support one another.
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In the hubbub of our busy lives, we often forget the value of common courtesy to our peers. Here's how to be a kinder person tomorrow (and every day).
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In the hubbub of our busy lives, we often forget the value of common courtesy to our peers. Here's how to be a kinder person tomorrow (and every day).
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Let me set the scene: I am a sophomore with wide eyes, a worried soul and little to no progress on my African American Studies final paper.
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Let me set the scene: I am a sophomore with wide eyes, a worried soul and little to no progress on my African American Studies final paper.
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Of course, there are problems big enough that “whining” is necessary. “No whining unless you’re bleeding” is not a literal instruction — If you’re seriously injured you should get help; the same is true for emotional pain and major life obstacles. The phrase has a second, implied meaning, which is that if you are in fact bleeding, asking for help doesn’t count as whining. Unfortunately, some people don’t see that, refusing to “whine” even when their problems are far larger than can be solved individually. Refusing to seek assistance — as in the case of addiction or depression — can be far more destructive than seeking it too much. A balance must be struck: If the problem is too big to solve alone, get someone to help you; if it’s a petty annoyance, don’t bring it up.
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Of course, there are problems big enough that “whining” is necessary. “No whining unless you’re bleeding” is not a literal instruction — If you’re seriously injured you should get help; the same is true for emotional pain and major life obstacles. The phrase has a second, implied meaning, which is that if you are in fact bleeding, asking for help doesn’t count as whining. Unfortunately, some people don’t see that, refusing to “whine” even when their problems are far larger than can be solved individually. Refusing to seek assistance — as in the case of addiction or depression — can be far more destructive than seeking it too much. A balance must be struck: If the problem is too big to solve alone, get someone to help you; if it’s a petty annoyance, don’t bring it up.
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