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BERKELEY'S NEWS • DECEMBER 05, 2022

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Jill Banfield

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Researchers at UC Berkeley and UCSF’s  Innovative Genomics Institute, or IGI, have found the diversity of CRISPR gene editors in viruses goes far beyond what they expected, possibly leading to new ways of editing genomes. 
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Researchers at UC Berkeley and UCSF’s  Innovative Genomics Institute, or IGI, have found the diversity of CRISPR gene editors in viruses goes far beyond what they expected, possibly leading to new ways of editing genomes. 
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A team of researchers at the Innovative Genomics Institute, or IGI, have found a way to use CRISPR technology to edit genes within a community, spearheading huge advancements in the medical industry.
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A team of researchers at the Innovative Genomics Institute, or IGI, have found a way to use CRISPR technology to edit genes within a community, spearheading huge advancements in the medical industry.
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UC Berkeley researchers and their collaborators found hundreds of relatively large viruses with genome sizes thought to only be characteristic of living organisms.
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UC Berkeley researchers and their collaborators found hundreds of relatively large viruses with genome sizes thought to only be characteristic of living organisms.
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In a collaborative effort, a research team composed of scientists from UC Berkeley and the U.S. Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute discovered a CRISPR protein, Cas14, the smallest gene-editing tool known to date.
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In a collaborative effort, a research team composed of scientists from UC Berkeley and the U.S. Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute discovered a CRISPR protein, Cas14, the smallest gene-editing tool known to date.
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A research team led by UC Berkeley scientists has defined a new branch to the tree of life after sequencing about 800 largely unknown bacteria genomes
A research team led by UC Berkeley scientists has defined a new branch to the tree of life after sequencing about 800 largely unknown bacteria genomes