A person holding a crying emoji and American flag

The decline of optimism in the US

What does this mean for American exceptionalism?

“They have all a lively faith in the perfectibility of man. … They all consider society as a body in a state of improvement.”   This is how Americans are described in the French political theorist and historian Alexis de Tocqueville’s book “Democracy in America.” Tocqueville traveled to the United
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Science should be nonpartisan, inform government policy

Science must be nonpartisan and tangibly inform political decision making. Scientists of both parties are obligated to model the nonpartisan nature of science, to ensure that these decisions are made with bipartisan engagement and uncompromised scientific support.
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Shakespeare as the voice of the millennial

It wasn’t until my Shakespeare professor introduced me to the engaging and somewhat comical process of rephrasing Shakespearean dialogue in modern, colloquial English that I was able to draw any connection between the 10-pound collection of Shakespeare’s plays on my desk and the social stratagem of the average millennial.
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One campus, divisible

The presidential election has magnified the divide between UC Berkeley's most active Republican and Democratic student groups.

Each Thursday, the Berkeley College Republicans and the Cal Berkeley Democrats begin announcements at 7:10 p.m. The conflicting meeting times lay the groundwork for partition.
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The Millennial misconception

The Devil's Advocate

“Generations, like people, have personalities,” wrote the Pew Research Center in an introduction to its detailed 2010 report on the characteristics of young voters, “and Millennials — the American teens and twenty-somethings who are making the passage into adulthood at the start of a new millennium — have begun to
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