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BERKELEY'S NEWS • NOVEMBER 29, 2022

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science fiction

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With the fall semester coming to a close and the stress amping up as we get toward finals season. You may want to escape this world for a bit. Luckily for you, we here at the Daily Clog have the perfect list of science fiction novels you can read to take you to galaxies far away.
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With the fall semester coming to a close and the stress amping up as we get toward finals season. You may want to escape this world for a bit. Luckily for you, we here at the Daily Clog have the perfect list of science fiction novels you can read to take you to galaxies far away.
featured article
Red, orange, yellow, green, blue, violet, indigo and the infinite range of colors in between — there is, ostensibly, nothing special about these colors of the rainbow or the color wheel in general. Yet, it is often these ordinary concepts that beg for our imagination to turn them into something spectacular and out of the box. 
featured article
Red, orange, yellow, green, blue, violet, indigo and the infinite range of colors in between — there is, ostensibly, nothing special about these colors of the rainbow or the color wheel in general. Yet, it is often these ordinary concepts that beg for our imagination to turn them into something spectacular and out of the box. 
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Chatagnier’s writing, rendered with reflective and evocative vitality, scintillates starlike on the page. For a science fiction novel so rooted in the groundedness of its mathematical particulars, it’s also enamored with forging prosaic beauty.
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Chatagnier’s writing, rendered with reflective and evocative vitality, scintillates starlike on the page. For a science fiction novel so rooted in the groundedness of its mathematical particulars, it’s also enamored with forging prosaic beauty.
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“Crimes of the Future” is a palatable oddball film grounded by Cronenberg’s directorial skills and a talented ensemble.
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“Crimes of the Future” is a palatable oddball film grounded by Cronenberg’s directorial skills and a talented ensemble.
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When Letissier performed Friday at Oakland Fox Theater to a packed crowd — one that was by majority white and by majority queer-presenting — fans received the show before them in a magnetic reverie as they danced to the electric beat.
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When Letissier performed Friday at Oakland Fox Theater to a packed crowd — one that was by majority white and by majority queer-presenting — fans received the show before them in a magnetic reverie as they danced to the electric beat.
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Tuesday’s talk covered everything from the nutritional value of algae to Weir’s hobbies of mixology, woodworking and board games.
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Tuesday’s talk covered everything from the nutritional value of algae to Weir’s hobbies of mixology, woodworking and board games.
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“Record of a Spaceborn Few,” the third in Becky Chambers’ loosely linked science fiction trilogy, explores the Fleet, a massive collection of ships.
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“Record of a Spaceborn Few,” the third in Becky Chambers’ loosely linked science fiction trilogy, explores the Fleet, a massive collection of ships.
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Despite some of the more problematic elements, the show’s insistence on giving these characters a happy, almost fairy-tale, ending feels important.
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Despite some of the more problematic elements, the show’s insistence on giving these characters a happy, almost fairy-tale, ending feels important.
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In a widely-ranging discussion of sci-fi texts of the past and present, UC Berkeley lecturer Emily Carpenter and professor Namwali Serpell articulate representations of race and gender, discuss the ways that sci-fi reflects contemporary politics and offer interpretations of popular films.
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In a widely-ranging discussion of sci-fi texts of the past and present, UC Berkeley lecturer Emily Carpenter and professor Namwali Serpell articulate representations of race and gender, discuss the ways that sci-fi reflects contemporary politics and offer interpretations of popular films.
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